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Old 04-10-2010, 09:36 PM
 
5 posts, read 16,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJGOAT View Post
As Lux said, the only way to tell for sure is to look at the throttle assembly. If you see a cable attached to a pivot point, you don't have drive by wire. The drive by wire assemblies look like a nub attached to the side of the throttle body with a couple wires running to it.
This is mostly true but not always. While doing the brakes on our 2000 Mercedes with DBW I noticed there is a cable attached to the pedal that goes through the firewall. It goes out next to the brake fluid reservoir and then connects to a sensor there in the engine bay. I verified by manually pulling on the wire/sensor and the engine revved.
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Old 04-10-2010, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,303 posts, read 22,756,647 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosecitywanderer View Post
Good picture, TN...another way to determine if it is a cable or DBW throttle is to push the accelerator pedal to the floor with the ignition off.
Thanks!

Yeah, the 2010 Kia Sedona (Hyundai Entourage) we rented a couple of weeks ago had the drive-by wire... I checked it out.

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Old 04-11-2010, 08:01 AM
 
Location: South Jersey
7,780 posts, read 17,798,082 times
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heck, I am old enough to remember the throttle but rods and cranks. Now *there* was a unsafe design. We once got a 63 Jag XKE to stick wide open under a hard launch due to the fact that the throttle rod went across the firewall from the passengers side and under the hood latch and with the body flexing as it did on the launch, it caused the rod to be lodged under the rear opening bonnet latch holding the throttle wide open and not allowing us to ope the hood to fix it. We were teenagers and scared half witless cause it was a neighbors car we has out when they were away on vacation
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Old 09-23-2010, 03:04 PM
Status: "Hope is a walking dream." (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Still in Portland, Oregon, for some reason
864 posts, read 2,983,989 times
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As posted in another thread, I got a new Santa Fe and it's my first car with drive-by-wire. The logic on this car is very good and unlike many other DBW cars I've driven, Hyundai actually put quite a bit of resistance into the pedal mechanism which is nice. Most DBW throttles have almost no resistance and cause your legs to cramp up within minutes of driving. This one is comfortable for hours and could easily be mistaken for a cable throttle.
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Old 09-23-2010, 05:25 PM
 
Location: H-town, TX.
3,400 posts, read 5,469,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisA70 View Post
I will not buy anything with "drive by wire" I always thought it was a bad idea... I don't care what anyone says, give me the old school cable. I will stick with my 1995 accord, OBD1, and a CABLE!!!!!!

And of all the cars I have owned in 22 years NONE of them ever had a throttle cable problem, NONE OF THEM..... I have owned 50+ cars.
If we're going to bring back old threads, why not pile on?

Don't ever own a Ford truck with a PowerStroke diesel in it or a 3.8L v6 Chevy Camaro.

Those were mid 90s vintage and had DBW in them. Heck, maybe all the other Oldsmobuicks of the time with the 3.8L had DBW, too.

I remember when I had this 1993 Isuzu Pickup back around 2001 or so and on the freeway way south of houston, my truck started revving out of nowhere. Other than the engine being loud, I had cruise control, of sorts! Damn throttle cable hung up on one of those annoyingly drizzly evenings and I had to stop and find the kink before I got going again.
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Old 09-23-2010, 05:57 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,715 posts, read 9,129,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rosecitywanderer View Post
As posted in another thread, I got a new Santa Fe and it's my first car with drive-by-wire. The logic on this car is very good and unlike many other DBW cars I've driven, Hyundai actually put quite a bit of resistance into the pedal mechanism which is nice. Most DBW throttles have almost no resistance and cause your legs to cramp up within minutes of driving. This one is comfortable for hours and could easily be mistaken for a cable throttle.
99.99% of the population wouldn't be able to tell if they are driving a drive-by-wire car or by cable accelerator. There is very little difference.
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:16 AM
 
280 posts, read 264,719 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfrisco View Post
99.99% of the population wouldn't be able to tell if they are driving a drive-by-wire car or by cable accelerator. There is very little difference.
I suppose Michael Hastings falls into the 0.01% who can.

Was Michael Hastings' Car Hacked? Richard Clarke Says It's Possible
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:08 AM
 
2,350 posts, read 4,266,052 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Movingrightalong... View Post
I suppose Michael Hastings falls into the 0.01% who can.

Was Michael Hastings' Car Hacked? Richard Clarke Says It's Possible

This article didn't really mention much of DBW however one of the links did:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/10/bu...ack.html?_r=1&
"Researchers were able to undermine the security protecting the cellular phone in the vehicle they bought and then insert malicious software. This allowed them to send commands to the car’s electronic control unit — the nerve center of a vehicle’s electronics system — which in turn made it possible to override various vehicle controls."
and
"The researchers declined to speculate about the worse situations, such as interfering with a vehicle’s control system to make it crash. "
In aviation there are two big reasons for FBW: weight reduction, and computer augmentation. (Airplanes can be built inherently unstable and the computers allow the plane to be flown in useable manner.) The former probably doesn't make too much difference in a car but the latter would.

Not an example of FBW but still augmentation is anti lock brakes. The electronics overrides the driver's demand to lock the brakes by holding the brake pedal down.
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