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Old 08-23-2014, 03:31 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,691 posts, read 86,859,041 times
Reputation: 29355

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Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
A 5 seater mid-sized car, Toyota Avensis. A car designed in Europe for the European market and built in the UK. Unavailable in the USA or Japan. The cheapest 1.8 litre manual shift:

Fuel Consumption:

Combined driving: 43.5 mpg (36.2 US)
Urban driving: 32.8 mpg (27.3 US)
Extra Urban driving: 52.3 mpg (43.55 US)

Maximum speed: 124 mph.
0-62mph: 9.4 seconds.

http://cdnlive.toyotaretail.co.uk.s3...es/avensis.pdf

I can look deeper and get even better figures on other makes and models.
That's a pretty impressive washing-machine-on-wheels you've got there. I'm guessing those fuel economy numbers are based on the laughably optimistic European-cycle ratings, which no doubt the Marketing Men™ made a point of mentioning more than once when luring you into their showroom.

Meanwhile in the real world, Fuelly.com contributors achieve a real-world average fuel economy of around 32mpg US. Which is nothing to sneeze at for sure, but there are a number of sedans (saloons if you prefer) available in the US that achieve similar real-world numbers while achieving similar or better acceleration performance. And yet you seem to labor under the misapprehension that you're driving some uniquely special fuel-sipper. If it weren't for your obviously superior intellect that you've displayed throughout this thread, one might suspect the Marketing Men™ got to you.
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Old 08-23-2014, 05:02 AM
 
Location: London
3,885 posts, read 3,331,047 times
Reputation: 1638
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaxRhapsody View Post
Hey, if you can do it, so can I.
The first picture you posted was from an old model. Here is the new model:




I can get far better fuel figures form other European makes and models if I look deeper. But I will let you do that and I am sure you will mess that up as well. Few Americans drive cars with the performance and fuel efficiency of the one above. They mostly buy cars with engines that are far too big.

Last edited by John-UK; 08-23-2014 at 05:11 AM..
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Old 08-23-2014, 05:21 AM
 
2,181 posts, read 2,038,766 times
Reputation: 3138
The new Golf R is a turbocharged 4 cylinder that puts out 300hp and 280 lb/ft of torque, from the factory. And you'll see at least 30mpg on the highway. You can get the ecu re-flashed and safely bump power up to almost 400.

Turbo 4's are the future.
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Old 08-23-2014, 05:55 AM
 
Location: London
3,885 posts, read 3,331,047 times
Reputation: 1638
Quote:
Originally Posted by tofur View Post
The new Golf R is a turbocharged 4 cylinder that puts out 300hp and 280 lb/ft of torque, from the factory. And you'll see at least 30mpg on the highway. You can get the ecu re-flashed and safely bump power up to almost 400.

Turbo 4's are the future.
The average driver does not need that HP. The engines for the average driver can be 4 cylinder turbo-less and still give great performance and economy. Gear the car to do no more than 100mph and even greater economy - and less polluting fuel burnt. But all this may be quite academic as 100% electric traction with range extenders flood the market in 5 years time.
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Old 08-23-2014, 05:59 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
10,715 posts, read 22,346,543 times
Reputation: 5137
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
The average driver does not need that HP. The engines for the average driver can be 4 cylinder turbo-less and still give great performance and economy. Gear the car to do no more than 100mph and even greater economy - and less polluting fuel burnt. But all this may be quite academic as 100% electric traction with range extenders flood the market in 5 years time.
Ya but who are you to tell people what they need or want?

Everybody has different needs or they enjoy different types of Cars/SUVs/Trucks and uses them for different purposes that you may not use your for or they just enjoy them because they are fast and fun or can tow/haul 5000+ pounds with ease.
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,527 posts, read 29,479,721 times
Reputation: 11934
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
The average driver does not need that HP. The engines for the average driver can be 4 cylinder turbo-less and still give great performance and economy. Gear the car to do no more than 100mph and even greater economy - and less polluting fuel burnt. But all this may be quite academic as 100% electric traction with range extenders flood the market in 5 years time.
A slow car is dangerous in some parts of the US. If you're trying to merge onto a freeway at 75mph and there's semi trucks coming you need something that can get out of the way.

My Sonata has a 2.4l 4cyl which I think is adequate, but I don't think I'd want anything any less powerful. My sister has a new Kia Soul with the 1.6 engine, and it struggles to climb hills or pass other cars.
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:41 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 24,635,498 times
Reputation: 9178
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
A 5 seater mid-sized car, Toyota Avensis. A car designed in Europe for the European market and built in the UK. Unavailable in the USA or Japan. The cheapest 1.8 litre manual shift:

Fuel Consumption:

Combined driving: 43.5 mpg (36.2 US)
Urban driving: 32.8 mpg (27.3 US)
Extra Urban driving: 52.3 mpg (43.55 US)

Maximum speed: 124 mph.
0-62mph: 9.4 seconds.

http://cdnlive.toyotaretail.co.uk.s3...es/avensis.pdf

I can look deeper and get even better figures on other makes and models.
0-62 MPH 9.4 secs is far SLOWER than average these days. A 4 cylinder Honda Accord with a CVT reaches 60 MPH in under 8 secs, and has EPA MPG ratings of 27/36. It can approach 40 MPG on the highway. The manual transmission 4 cylinder reaches 60 MPH in 6.8 secs.

Acceleration is more meaningful and useful in every day driving than top speed.
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Old 08-23-2014, 11:20 AM
 
2,659 posts, read 2,825,072 times
Reputation: 2127
It's amazing that this pointless, outdated thread continues. It started years ago.

Turbo 4s are mainstream now. There are some very good ones, even in larger cars. They will get better yet. There are also V6, V8, Vxs ...often turbo or super charged... and most everything else imaginable (like hibrides and electrocars...). Heck someone somewhere is probably working on hydro, solar and wind power ).

These are exciting times, especially if you recall when a dual carb flathead V8 was considered 'trick'.

For now, find something you like and drive it. Everyone's taste, driving, budget, and priorities are different.

It won't be long until "driving" will be done by an app. People will recall "the good ol' days" when humans actually controlled the vehicle.

To each his/her own... vive la différence!
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Old 08-23-2014, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY
3,945 posts, read 3,550,560 times
Reputation: 3093
Quote:
Originally Posted by John-UK View Post
The first picture you posted was from an old model. Here is the new model:




I can get far better fuel figures form other European makes and models if I look deeper. But I will let you do that and I am sure you will mess that up as well. Few Americans drive cars with the performance and fuel efficiency of the one above. They mostly buy cars with engines that are far too big.
Actually most people don't buy cars with too big an engine, you don't know anything about the cars here at all if you keep sayinh that crap, everyone has told you this. 90% of cars here are four cyclinders and v6's, most mid size cars(something much bigger than your "mid size") are v6 powered. The biggest v6's to mind are the 3.8L in the mustang and camaro. You must not know power to weight ratio, to understand why a 3300lb car needs around 290 net hp.
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Old 08-24-2014, 03:24 AM
 
Location: London
3,885 posts, read 3,331,047 times
Reputation: 1638
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTOlover View Post
Ya but who are you to tell people what they need or want?
Who are giant, powerful, greedy corporations to tell you what you want.
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