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Old 04-08-2010, 10:42 AM
 
6,368 posts, read 13,349,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
What happens if you overcharge a 134A system on a top-off?
Depends on how much it's overcharged.
A couple of ounces won't cause any damage but cooling will decrease. Half a pound or more and it will not cool much at all and compressor damage is likely.

R-134 systems are more sensitive to having the correct charge than R-12 systems were.
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Old 05-27-2010, 04:40 PM
 
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I have a 2000 chevy blazer with r134a a/c sytem will r12 work in it or should i get the r134a?
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Old 05-27-2010, 05:00 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
2,715 posts, read 9,121,633 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanwpolt View Post
I have a 2000 chevy blazer with r134a a/c sytem will r12 work in it or should i get the r134a?
You need r134a and you can get it at any local auto parts store. Easy to put in. In some states you may not be able to get it at a parts store.

R12 hasn't been produced in so long it's almost impossible to find a shop that has it--and if you find one that has it $$$. Most R12 A/C systems have been converted to r134a. Besides r12 won't work anyway.
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Old 05-28-2010, 06:17 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 22,461,476 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nativechief View Post
Yo ,you do know that you cant use 134 in a car made to use r12 dont you? The ac will need to be converted first.
I've always heard that.

But several years ago, I actually mixed 134 in a car that came with R12. The car was on its last leg, and I do mean last leg. I wasn't going to pay a butt-load of money to do the conversion, so I just put in some 134. I figured if it didn't work I wasn't out anything, and if by chance it did work I was golden.

It worked perfectly fine. Ran it for 2 summers that way.

I'm not saying that anybody else should do that, or that it'd work like that again. Just that that was my experience.



That said, from everything I've read, R12 actually blows a little colder. But in most cases that's not going to matter, because any properly operating AC system is capable of freezing your schnuts off.
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Old 05-28-2010, 10:39 AM
 
30,882 posts, read 24,219,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimboburnsy View Post
What happens if you overcharge a 134A system on a top-off?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gimme3steps View Post
Depends on how much it's overcharged.
A couple of ounces won't cause any damage but cooling will decrease. Half a pound or more and it will not cool much at all and compressor damage is likely.

R-134 systems are more sensitive to having the correct charge than R-12 systems were.
gimme has it right. the problem with overcharging an R134a system is that R134a does not like to change quickly from a liquid to a gas, and then back again. an overcharged, even a slightly overcharged, R134a system you run the risk of the compressor locking up due to hydrostatic lock.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanwpolt View Post
I have a 2000 chevy blazer with r134a a/c sytem will r12 work in it or should i get the r134a?
contrary to popular opinion, you CAN mix R12 and R134a(R22 anyone). remember that R12 is a CFC(or fully halogenated gas), and R134a is an HFC(or non halogenated gas), where as R22 is an HCFC(a partially halogenated gas).

the problem isnt the refrigerants, it is the oil used in the systems. you cannot use the mineral oil used in the R12 systems with R22 or R134a as the oil will curdle, and then you have real problems. oddly enough though R12 is compatible with any of the oils used in the R134a system.

when converting to R134a, you have to eliminate all the old oil from the system, replace the receiver/drier, and swap to a barrier style hose, as well as change the seals in the compressor as the R134a molecule is smaller than the R12 molecule. one option that does help is swapping the R12 style condenser to a high efficiency R134a style condenser.
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Old 05-28-2010, 12:12 PM
 
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I had my 86 suburban converted to 134 about 8 years ago. Works as good as it did with R12. Cost about $600.00 to convert and last year I had to have it recharged and it works fine.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:44 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 4,472,189 times
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I've been using Difluoroethane R152a computer air duster cleaner in place of both and it is every bit as cold as R12 and seems to work quite well in older R12 systems.
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Old 11-11-2012, 09:10 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,303 posts, read 22,741,659 times
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I had a '72 Buick Electra back in 2002 with working A/C. It had never been recharged and blew out ice cubes!! My '93 Cadillac has ice cold air (I am not sure if its R134 or R12, I know that most cars switched to R134 by 1994, but some a little sooner) and my '95 Lincoln has R134 and its pretty cold as well. My '93 Mercedes also has ice cold A/C and I think its R134.
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Old 11-11-2012, 09:49 PM
 
1,345 posts, read 2,213,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanwpolt View Post
I have a 2000 chevy blazer with r134a a/c sytem will r12 work in it or should i get the r134a?
Cars were required to use r134 by 1994, some started the change earlier. Now my advice, dont put that stop leak freon in ur vehicle. It's mostly pure garbage, and will screw up ur whole system. If u have a leak, put in the 134 with the dye in it, with any luck u should be able to find the leak.
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Old 12-08-2012, 01:29 PM
 
2,024 posts, read 4,472,189 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 73-79 ford fan View Post
I've been using Difluoroethane R152a computer air duster cleaner in place of both and it is every bit as cold as R12 and seems to work quite well in older R12 systems.
Getting a bit cold for AC but another good thing I noticed about R152a is how little it slows down old York compressors which tend to bog the engine down a bit with other refrigerants. R152a seems to be a better replacement for R12 then R134a.
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