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Old 04-09-2010, 09:02 PM
 
390 posts, read 801,954 times
Reputation: 261
I got the oil changed this morning since they could get me in right away. This is a shop I've frequented in the past since their prices were extremely competitive, plus I like to support a local business rather than a chain. Their quality has been fine from what I can tell.

However, today, I got ticked off. They have some new employee writing the ticket and I got charged almost $60 for an oil change! Outlandish!!!

I expressed some reservation about the charge, saying that comparable businesses locally typically charge $30 to $40. He said he was under pressure from his boss to write higher tickets, or something to that effect.

I was really ticked off. Do you think I should talk tot the manager about this? I've probably given them nearly a couple grand in business over the last year and a half!

Last edited by guy1; 04-09-2010 at 10:09 PM..
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Old 04-09-2010, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
11,932 posts, read 11,419,953 times
Reputation: 7187
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huskyz View Post
What are some major differences in engine design and build that influence manufacturer's recommended OCI? (e.g. drive train gearing...but of course that isn't the engine)

Do manufacturers tend to keep same OCI across different engines?
I don't have any data to back this up. But I can think of a few things that might influence the OCI:

- number of cylinders. A 4 cyl engine has half as many ignitions (explosions) as a an 8 cyl engine for the same number of rpms. So the 8 cylinder engine might have a greater likelihood of cumbustion-related issues.
- forced induction (esp. turbos) - which need oil to lubricate their high speed operation
- normal rpm range - a highway car might spend most of its life at 2000 rpm, while a performance car might spend a lot of time at 5000 rpm or higher.
- temperature - both the engine itself and ambient
- air filter design - dirt enters the engine through the intake system
- tolerances - rings/pistons etc. - I have read that one reason so many vehicles today use 5W20 vs. the much heavier oils used before is the far better machining today. Tighter tolerances and smoother finishes allow lighter oils.
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Old 04-09-2010, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
860 posts, read 1,742,518 times
Reputation: 633
I do the oil myself every 5,000 miles...full synthetic and a genuine Hyundai oil filter.
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Old 04-11-2010, 12:31 AM
 
390 posts, read 801,954 times
Reputation: 261
There's no such thing as 100% interstate driving. Even commercial truck drivers have to drop off their cargo in the middle of a city often. This means that they have to meander for miles at the beginning and end of their trips through congested stop and go city traffic.

Yet, very few of us would consider such a driving pattern (a few miles in the city and hundreds on the freeway) "city driving." In this past interval, at least 80% if not more of my driving was on the freeway.

Think about it: if the BEST CASE scenario is 80-90% freeway, 10% or so city, then this would be the equivalent of the non severe interval (7500K miles). If ANY city driving led to severe usage interval oil changes, then the manufacturer would not logically have included both a severe vs. non severe usage interval, only the city interval.

I went about 4300 miles between oil changes, not 7600 btw.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
In a word...NO! your driving is still severe service since not 100% of the miles are 100% interstate style driving.

Now if you are in a hurry to go cheap and cut the life of your vehicle then do as you will 'cause longer change interval will do that for you for sure.

Oil never wears out it get contaminated with combustion by products and acids which NEVER burn off completely in city style driving.
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Old 04-11-2010, 09:09 AM
 
3,555 posts, read 4,617,784 times
Reputation: 2213
I've been a 5,000 miles per change guy since the early '80s at least. It's easy to remember, 5/10/15/20/...55/60/65 etc. None of our cars ever had very much of the "severe" driving because the little "city commuting" we did was not in rush hour.

That said, here are some things to consider;

You are very UNLIKELY to have a major failure in your engine. It's the smaller stuff on cars; A/C, alternator, suspension that will probably end up driving you to get rid of it.

Most people don't keep their cars long enough to end up with an engine problem so you're building value for the 2nd or 3rd owner.

That said, having GOOD, RELIABLE RECORDS or oil changes and other services increases the resale value of your car. Whether you sell it yourself or trade it at the dealer (most people) being able to show regular, timely service makes your car a better value.

BTW, in the last year I sold a car that only had 70,000 miles on it. Until this one I had never sold one with fewer than 100,000 on it, many of them pushing 200,000 and ALL OF THEM BOUGHT USED. The only internal engine problem with any of them was a sticking valve on a 4.0 liter Jeep. I used a "liqud fix" on it and that did take care of it.

The only other "engine" problems I have had was a bad carb on a previous Cherokee (everything is FI now so that problem is gone) and a couple of A/Cs on mid-'80s GM cars. Those A/Cs were notoriously bad, aluminum vanes in the compressor that would disintegrate over time, the only reliable fix was to replace everything! Even that only cost about $550 back in the early '90s and for 6-7 year old cars wasn't too bad.

Occassional water pumps (more than occassional on 2.8 liter GM V-6s), plugs and plug wires. Oh, I almost forgot, vacuum leaks on the plastic intake manifolds on Ford v-8s in the late '90s. Still, both of those cars went 200,000 miles with nothing else done to them!
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Old 04-11-2010, 07:41 PM
 
5,891 posts, read 4,213,515 times
Reputation: 2753
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sayantsi View Post
Its not that cheap if you change it out so new, that's just like changing tires every three months regardless of wear.

Unless you know what condition the oil is in by getting an oil analysis done, its all guesswork, but generally speaking, most oil is fine well past the 7,500 mi mark these days.

Personally, it amazes me when people say things like "cheap insurance!" when they are spending ~$30 on too-frequent oil changes, but won't pony up the $25 to get a used oil analysis done to know for sure if they can extend oil changes. Knowing you can go even 6k mi between changes instead of 3k mi will recoup you that money after the first extended oil change. Cheap insurance indeed, plus you actually know what's going on in your engine.

If you drive 12k mi a year, knowing the proper mileage for your oil could mean 1 oil change per year vs 4, $30 vs $120, and over a five year period, $150 vs $600. Plus, all that lost time doing the work or waiting for someone else to do it. It adds up.

Not all oil labs are equal however - Blackstone oil labs gives a good, comprehensive report and explains things in common English - prob the best place to go.
It's a Power Stroke 7.3L Diesel and my manual calls for a change every 3K. It holds 15 quarts with 2 of which are in the filter (Motorcraft FL1995) which gets changed every time. I always use 15w-40 and change it myself. It is also turbo charged and I'm not taking any chances with the impellers or bearings. Mine has 114,000 MI on it and runs like new. Oil is cheap!LOL....

Last edited by 2RUGGED4YOU; 04-11-2010 at 07:53 PM..
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Old 04-12-2010, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,310 posts, read 19,949,049 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
I have been hearing a lot from the Consumer Reports grup and many others that we can easily go 6K between oil changes, but most say just to follow manufacturer's recommendations from the owner's manual..... and unfortunately my Kia says in the book to change oil every 3 months or 3000 miles. So that comes full circle to what we are always told is overkill!
I just sold a 1999 Chevy Tahoe with 193,000 miles on it. Had two tune ups and that was it for any sort of engine work. I changed the oil every 2500 miles and the filter every five. I realize that this is total overkill, but doing it that way takes any sort of memory out of the equation. If you see a number on the odometer ending with 5,000 or 2,500, its time to change the oil or the oil & filter.

I was a little sad to see the truck go. Whoever buys it from Carmax (or more likely, whoever buys it from the used car dealer who buys it from Carmax) will either be some dipsh** who can't put batteries in a flashlight and it will be dead in six months or it will be some gearhead who fixes the little stuff that I didn't know how to fix and he'll get another 100K out of it.
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Old 04-12-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,310 posts, read 19,949,049 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgod View Post
I've been a 5,000 miles per change guy since the early '80s at least. It's easy to remember, 5/10/15/20/...55/60/65 etc. None of our cars ever had very much of the "severe" driving because the little "city commuting" we did was not in rush hour.

That said, here are some things to consider;

You are very UNLIKELY to have a major failure in your engine. It's the smaller stuff on cars; A/C, alternator, suspension that will probably end up driving you to get rid of it.

Most people don't keep their cars long enough to end up with an engine problem so you're building value for the 2nd or 3rd owner.

That said, having GOOD, RELIABLE RECORDS or oil changes and other services increases the resale value of your car. Whether you sell it yourself or trade it at the dealer (most people) being able to show regular, timely service makes your car a better value.

BTW, in the last year I sold a car that only had 70,000 miles on it. Until this one I had never sold one with fewer than 100,000 on it, many of them pushing 200,000 and ALL OF THEM BOUGHT USED. The only internal engine problem with any of them was a sticking valve on a 4.0 liter Jeep. I used a "liqud fix" on it and that did take care of it.

The only other "engine" problems I have had was a bad carb on a previous Cherokee (everything is FI now so that problem is gone) and a couple of A/Cs on mid-'80s GM cars. Those A/Cs were notoriously bad, aluminum vanes in the compressor that would disintegrate over time, the only reliable fix was to replace everything! Even that only cost about $550 back in the early '90s and for 6-7 year old cars wasn't too bad.

Occassional water pumps (more than occassional on 2.8 liter GM V-6s), plugs and plug wires. Oh, I almost forgot, vacuum leaks on the plastic intake manifolds on Ford v-8s in the late '90s. Still, both of those cars went 200,000 miles with nothing else done to them!
You may have just changed my mind away from that "every 2500" oil stuff.
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Old 04-12-2010, 06:27 PM
 
404 posts, read 707,227 times
Reputation: 204
OMG my car is 26m past the 3000m mark since my LAST oil change! i may wait 500 to 1000 miles more, too

whats gonna happen NOW!!
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Old 04-13-2010, 07:44 PM
 
5,891 posts, read 4,213,515 times
Reputation: 2753
Quote:
Originally Posted by ploopy View Post
OMG my car is 26m past the 3000m mark since my LAST oil change! i may wait 500 to 1000 miles more, too

whats gonna happen NOW!!
Nothing, you should be fine. I just don't do it myself.
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