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Old 04-17-2010, 01:00 AM
 
Location: North
740 posts, read 1,120,498 times
Reputation: 769

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We got recently a 2005 Toyota Sienna. We live in New England and we're wondering if applying a rubberized undercoat would be a good idea or no. We'll do it ourselves with cans from the auto store.

Thanks.
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Old 04-17-2010, 01:13 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
10,715 posts, read 21,022,033 times
Reputation: 5112
Keeping it really clean will do more than undercoating ,,, a light oil in the doors and fenders helps also ...under coating isn't as nessesary today as it was in the past ...On the very bottom , it may help with stone damage

If you decide to undercoat, it is VERY IMPORTANT to properly CLEAN and PREP the underside first. Like a good quality paint job PREPARATION is 9/10 of the job. This also applys to undercoating a used car.

Really as hard, through question to the person (not the saleman) doing the actual undercoating. Try to visit the undercoating facility, ask to review, in detail the prep stes involved. Also ask to get customers' referrals, names, phone numbers, and contact these customers. This will give you an idea on the quality of undercoating work done on their vehicles.

I know I am sounding anal about this, but I hate to see people thow away good, hard earned cash on a poorly done undercoating job.
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Old 04-17-2010, 01:56 AM
 
404 posts, read 1,155,575 times
Reputation: 219
i am a newb so i gotta ask: what is the purpose of this undercoat? and what exactly is coated?

i like the idea for sound insulation from road noise, etc. if that is one of the benefits? what are some others and what is the typical cost?
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Old 04-17-2010, 02:38 AM
 
2,024 posts, read 4,257,200 times
Reputation: 1987
The purpose of the undercoat is to avoid having the vehicle look like this pickup in a few years.


YouTube - 3 5 10 My New Show TEERUK???
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Old 04-17-2010, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 15,820,448 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merjolie8 View Post
We got recently a 2005 Toyota Sienna. We live in New England and we're wondering if applying a rubberized undercoat would be a good idea or no. We'll do it ourselves with cans from the auto store.

Thanks.

Undercoating is a waste of money today with all the prep done at the factory to keep rust away for the mandated 5 years. In fact you could cause rust to form due to trapping moisture pockets of the home done undercoat.

Just give the undercarriage a good wash job in the spring (never wash with hot water in winter since the hot water will wick into body seams ) and save the money on undercoating.
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Old 04-17-2010, 12:04 PM
 
19,122 posts, read 19,850,468 times
Reputation: 7290
I disagree.... I live in Hell's Bump New Hampshire and they sand and salt hard here year round on the dirt roads, and salt gets everywhere, and right into ECU's with the respevtive wiring, so salt gets every where, and EATS metals, and eats them more when it ia dis-similar metals.

It is wise to clean very well, and it is hard to clean very well, is places like drain holes on pick up beds above the rear wheels.

I clean every thing in as much detail as possible, making drains bigger than they are, and make sure the vehical is dry.

Then with new ATF (yeah tranny fluid) I spray it into places I can not reach any other way, like above the rear wheel wells.

In doors I clean all inside them, and stuff paper towels in the drains and soak the pinch welds with ATF.

I cut open rocker pannels and make a cover for the opening in stainless steel. I open all these drains too, and again stuff paper towels in them and dump in ATF.

The atf goes into the pinch welds. I try to give the atf 3 days or so to get deep into the pinch welds, and then pull the paper towels, and drain the oil into plastic wall paper trays.

In the mean time the seats come out, the carpets all come out, and I oil with atf all over the floor areas, again filling pinch welds. I make a big bloomin mess to, and add roffing cement to all these areas where it won't show, sometime adding new engine oil, depending on if I want the area to stay wetted and so preventing the roofing cement from drying, or not.

With wetted roffing cement I will paint with a brush inside doors, I will jack the vehical up and fill rickers with heated roofing cement plugging the drains as needed.. While the cement is still warm I will drain it too, and repeat jacking from the othe end..

Where rust proofing will show I use 3-M brand undercoating and stone chip guard.

I have gone so far as to create plastic inner fenders from the ft of a junk volvo to fit the rear wheel wells of my volvo, after cutting and fitting I remove what I made and atf everything, roofing cement over that and install the pastic inner fenders last.

This is a lot of details but for me and my 1985 turbo car it is well worth it to me.

There is no car made today I would even want if it was free.

Each year I spray ATF all over the under carriage too, avoiding the exhaust naturally, but it gets a bit since i can't prevent it totally.

IMO the state has no bee's wax charging for a forced state inspection when the state itself is the cause of rot and hammered suspentions.

I use a lot of other anti rust products and rust converters too, and 3-M welding thru paints in places you never see.

In the mid 90s I did the door over on my 83 chevy pick up which was rotten, and used metal I got from a dodge sliding van door for it. Today you can't tell the door isn't oem and that it ever was rusted out, and I haven't done a thing to that door since. The whole lower half of that door is dodge metal, not that it is any better than chevy metal. All the galvinized material was removed before the welding was done, so that isn't why this door is any good today either.

If you ask me all the car makers forgot how to build a car a long time ago.

All they do now is stamp out parts, and slap car together. It works ok if the aim is a new car each 3 to 5 years.
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Old 04-17-2010, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 15,820,448 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
I disagree.... I live in Hell's Bump New Hampshire and they sand and salt hard here year round on the dirt roads, and salt gets everywhere, and right into ECU's with the respevtive wiring, so salt gets every where, and EATS metals, and eats them more when it ia dis-similar metals.

It is wise to clean very well, and it is hard to clean very well, is places like drain holes on pick up beds above the rear wheels.

I clean every thing in as much detail as possible, making drains bigger than they are, and make sure the vehical is dry.

Then with new ATF (yeah tranny fluid) I spray it into places I can not reach any other way, like above the rear wheel wells.

In doors I clean all inside them, and stuff paper towels in the drains and soak the pinch welds with ATF.

I cut open rocker pannels and make a cover for the opening in stainless steel. I open all these drains too, and again stuff paper towels in them and dump in ATF.

The atf goes into the pinch welds. I try to give the atf 3 days or so to get deep into the pinch welds, and then pull the paper towels, and drain the oil into plastic wall paper trays.

In the mean time the seats come out, the carpets all come out, and I oil with atf all over the floor areas, again filling pinch welds. I make a big bloomin mess to, and add roffing cement to all these areas where it won't show, sometime adding new engine oil, depending on if I want the area to stay wetted and so preventing the roofing cement from drying, or not.

With wetted roffing cement I will paint with a brush inside doors, I will jack the vehical up and fill rickers with heated roofing cement plugging the drains as needed.. While the cement is still warm I will drain it too, and repeat jacking from the othe end..

Where rust proofing will show I use 3-M brand undercoating and stone chip guard.

I have gone so far as to create plastic inner fenders from the ft of a junk volvo to fit the rear wheel wells of my volvo, after cutting and fitting I remove what I made and atf everything, roofing cement over that and install the pastic inner fenders last.

This is a lot of details but for me and my 1985 turbo car it is well worth it to me.

There is no car made today I would even want if it was free.

Each year I spray ATF all over the under carriage too, avoiding the exhaust naturally, but it gets a bit since i can't prevent it totally.

IMO the state has no bee's wax charging for a forced state inspection when the state itself is the cause of rot and hammered suspentions.

I use a lot of other anti rust products and rust converters too, and 3-M welding thru paints in places you never see.

In the mid 90s I did the door over on my 83 chevy pick up which was rotten, and used metal I got from a dodge sliding van door for it. Today you can't tell the door isn't oem and that it ever was rusted out, and I haven't done a thing to that door since. The whole lower half of that door is dodge metal, not that it is any better than chevy metal. All the galvinized material was removed before the welding was done, so that isn't why this door is any good today either.

If you ask me all the car makers forgot how to build a car a long time ago.

All they do now is stamp out parts, and slap car together. It works ok if the aim is a new car each 3 to 5 years.
The OP's vehicle it a 2005 which means that any rusting is well underway already. Any attempt at home grown rust proofing is a waste of money.
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Old 04-17-2010, 08:51 PM
 
Location: U.S.A.
3,243 posts, read 8,243,106 times
Reputation: 2766
Rubberized undercoating should only be applied if the underlying frame/body is sufficiently prepped. Most shops just blast it all over the underside without any prep expecting it to work... well it doesnt.

POR15 or equivalent is the only way to go.
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