U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
View Poll Results: is baltimore a northern city?
yes 52 45.61%
no 62 54.39%
Voters: 114. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-07-2010, 08:12 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 5,339,789 times
Reputation: 2938
Note the direction of the cannons on Federal Hill: Pointed toward the city, not the harbor. In other words, don't you get any ideas you southern sympathizers! Cessation was discussed in the legislature. The union arrested sympathizers in Baltimore, which was placed under martial law. There's this line in our state song: "Huzza! she spurns the Northern scum!"

The point is that this is an old question. Back then Baltimore did not fit in a congruous manner with the rest of the north and I still don't believe that it does. Go up to Boston, they all think we're southerners, too.

Baltimore just doesn't fit in the southern or northern debate and it never has. This is, however, the northernmost city where small talk and pleasant greetings when passing someone in the street is acceptable. Once you get to Phila. it's duck you head and walk quickly.

Not northern, not southern, just Baltimore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-07-2010, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
2,946 posts, read 3,935,936 times
Reputation: 1185
It doesn't fit well into either catagory. It has (had) a large industrial base like cities to its north, but a high % of the population is black, like cities to its south. The white population contains ethnic whites like the cities to its north, and transplanted Appalachians like the industrial cities of the Midwestern rust belt. Baltimore has hot, humid summers like cities to its south, but still gets hit by the big Nor'easters like its northern neighbors.

This question is like asking if a racoon is a cat or a dog. It is neither, it is just a racoon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2010, 03:37 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,177 posts, read 8,686,354 times
Reputation: 1449
There is a question very similar to this over on the "General US" thread. The overwhelming majority feel it is northeastern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-08-2010, 05:15 AM
 
74 posts, read 142,417 times
Reputation: 30
I vote Mid-Atlantic city! Does that mean I'm on the fence?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 11:27 PM
 
Location: The better side of the Mason-Dixon Line
4,594 posts, read 6,788,397 times
Reputation: 2147
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldenchild08 View Post
To me Baltimore has more of a Northeastern feel to it than DC. For example, Baltimore and Philly are very similar. The accents, the attitudes of the locals, the blue collar/working class histories are very similar in both cities. When I think of Philly and Baltimore I just think of tan Timberland boots, old houses that are hundreds of years old and roughneck East Coast city attitudes. I remember when I used to work with a girl from Baltimore City and our male co-workers use to tease her by saying that she never traveled anywhere. Her reply was that she visits Philly on a regular basis. My male co-workers died laughing and exclaimed that "Philly IS Baltimore! Philly looks the same. They dress the same up there! It smells the same! You left home without leaving home!" It was very funny to say the least.
I have to differ actually. I think the blue collar, laid back feel that still survives in parts of the region like Dundalk, Pasadena, Essex, etc is not particularly Northeastern. The "hon" thing definitely is more southern hospitality than northeastern abrasive. True the blue collar feel can also be "northern" but more of a Midwestern kind than actual "Northeast". I've heard many comparisons between Baltimore and Pittsburgh and Cleveland.

If anything, Baltimore feels somewhat like an average, all-American city. I've been across the country, and most people in this area seem to be more like people I've met in Kansas City, St. Louis or Memphis than Washington, D.C. I think DC is the typical Northeastern city along with New York and Boston - with the fast livestyle, high-powered yuppies, high fashion, world sophistication, etc. I think the influx of yuppies into areas like Fed Hill and Fells Point are a more northeastern influence. Many of the older cities in the South like Atlanta, New Orleans, and Richmond are very dense. Baltimore is overcrowded but public transportation isn't that well developed and the area is very car-centered and I'm glad that Baltimore has much better freeway access compared to Washington DC which has no freeway thru the District. If not for Barbara Mikulski it would be even better if I-83 connected with 95 and Interstate 70 ran into downtown.

My feeling is and I've heard others say (and I think this is a positive) is that Baltimore feels pretty small town or even "redneck" for such a large metro area. In many parts of Baltimore County you see people that would not be out of place in rural Tennessee or Missouri. The country station is the second most popular radio format here, I've seen Confederate flags in Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and Anne Arundel counties. Interestingly enough despite the Confederate flags and the country feel, Carroll County feels more northern like Pennsylvania while the Eastern Shore is more Southern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2010, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,177 posts, read 8,686,354 times
Reputation: 1449
John Waters wrote a great description of Baltimore:

"I would never want to live anywhere but Baltimore. You can look far and wide, but you'll never discover a stranger city with such extreme style. It's as if every eccentric in the South decided to move North, ran out of gas in Baltimore, and decided to stay." And so John Waters, one of Baltimore's best-known sons, describes his beloved city. For many filmgoers and travelers alike. Waters single-handedly and squarely placed the city on the cinematic map. It's hard to think of Baltimore without referencing him. Where else on earth could Divine, the Egg Lady, Mink Stole, and all the twisted gang trample and rampage through the streets undeterred?

Sure, Baltimore is also famous for the prestigious Johns Hopkins UniversityJohns Hopkins University, mainly at Baltimore, Md. Johns Hopkins in 1867 had a group of his associates incorporated as the trustees of a university and a hospital, endowing each with $3.5 million. Daniel C.
and the Peabody InstituteThe Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University is a conservatory and preparatory school located in the Mount Vernon area of Baltimore, Maryland. The Peabody Conservatory of Music, one of the divisions of the Institute, is considered one of the leading music conservatories in
, but "any town that gave you [world-renowned atheist] Madalyn Murray O'Hair Madalyn Murray O'Hair (April 13 1919 – September 29 1995) was an American who founded American Atheists and campaigned for the separation of church and state. She was murdered at age 76 by David Roland Waters. and Spiro Agnew Spiro Theodore Agnew (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving under President Richard M. Nixon, and the fifty-fifth Governor of Maryland. has to have something going for it," Waters writes in his book Shock Value. "Baltimore madness is highly original. Some of the local eccentrics impress me More than any celebrity I've ever met and fascinate me so much that I resist getting to know them for fear I'll discover they aren't as happy as they appear
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2010, 01:35 PM
 
4,347 posts, read 4,736,105 times
Reputation: 1506
Baltimore is definitely northeastern. Just look at the characteristics of the city. If someone dropped you in Baltimore and you had no idea what the city looked like. Would you really think you are in the south?'

Let's please kill the Mason/Dixon line argument once and for all. Baltimore is farther north than the southern most part of New Jersery. Do some research.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2010, 12:13 AM
 
73 posts, read 121,362 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post

Baltimore is overcrowded but public transportation isn't that well developed and the area is very car-centered and I'm glad that Baltimore has much better freeway access compared to Washington DC which has no freeway thru the District. If not for Barbara Mikulski it would be even better if I-83 connected with 95 and Interstate 70 ran into downtown.
You're kidding, right? The fact that I83 was cancelled through downtown allowed 4 historic neighborhoods to be preserved, allowed for the revitalization of the Inner Harbor, saved Fells Point from near total demolition, and saved Linkin Park from having a 6 lane viaduct destroy one of our biggest parks.

Cities and transportation systems aren't just about building as many highways as possible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2010, 12:59 AM
 
Location: 602/520
2,441 posts, read 3,588,855 times
Reputation: 1815
Baltimore is the Mid-Atlantic with heavy Northeastern influence.

It is basically Philadelphia's smaller, more ghetto half-sibling.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2010, 07:40 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 5,339,789 times
Reputation: 2938
Quote:
Originally Posted by ajacksb View Post
You're kidding, right? The fact that I83 was cancelled through downtown allowed 4 historic neighborhoods to be preserved, allowed for the revitalization of the Inner Harbor, saved Fells Point from near total demolition, and saved Linkin Park from having a 6 lane viaduct destroy one of our biggest parks.

Cities and transportation systems aren't just about building as many highways as possible.
Tom Lennox has never, ever been to Leakin Park. I am certain of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $79,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top