U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 04-23-2011, 11:03 PM
 
Location: The Bay and Maryland
1,362 posts, read 3,079,887 times
Reputation: 2138

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgiaAve D.C. View Post
We folks here in D.C. so see Baltimore somewhat like New York. We also see Philly as somewhat like NYC.
Both of those cities have the urban grit and tall building like you would find in NYC. People in Bmore and Philly give off a rough feel similar to NYC.

Plus black people in Baltimore say "yo" more than any other city.
I somewhat understand where you're coming from. Baltimore, Philly and NYC have a more classic urban East Coast/Up-North feel in the Black population. Black folks from Baltimore, Philly and NYC wear Pelle Pelle and Avirex leathers, looser or baggier jeans, tan Timberland boots, all white Nike Air Force One lows, NY Yankee fitted caps etc. All of these styles and fashions were popular nationwide during the early to mid 90's to the early 2000's because NYC/Philly style and music was dominating popular urban culture on the airwaves. However, this minority subset of the Black population in NYC does not account for all of the diversity that exists in New York as a whole. New York has ALL types of people, not just ghetto Black folks who wear the traditional 90's urban uniform. DC natives always think they've one-up'd New Yorkers because certain Black New Yorkers dress and talk "played out" in their eyes. They could not be anymore wrong because DC has weird country local fashion trends, music *cough* Go-go *cough* and slang that no one from any other cities likes or copies as well . But even DC takes cues from New York in terms of fashion. The North Face trend in NYC slowly started in the late 80's. North Face didn't become a big trend in DC until 2002-2003. But like I stated in the previous thread, NYC is the biggest most cosmopolitan city in America. Baltimore is mostly just a ghetto second tier city with a few nice areas and no where near on the level of a being a world-class international city like New York.

Last edited by goldenchild08; 04-23-2011 at 11:17 PM..

 
Old 04-24-2011, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 954,975 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
Trust me its not that many. I would like to see your so called list of cities outside of the Northeast that you think would beat Baltimore. I'm pretty confident I'll debunk most of them if not all of them.
You never said they had to be outside of the northeast. You think Maryland is in the northeast anyway, don't you? I'm not arguing with something so foolish on Easter Sunday- anyone with half a mind realizes there are plenty of cities inside and outside the northeast that are more like New York than Baltimore is. If you can't figure out 12 of these cities, then you need to do more traveling.
 
Old 04-24-2011, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Vineland, NJ
8,385 posts, read 9,945,414 times
Reputation: 5230
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDguy99 View Post
You never said they had to be outside of the northeast. You think Maryland is in the northeast anyway, don't you? I'm not arguing with something so foolish on Easter Sunday- anyone with half a mind realizes there are plenty of cities inside and outside the northeast that are more like New York than Baltimore is. If you can't figure out 12 of these cities, then you need to do more traveling.
If your one of those types of people who relies heavily on the outdated mason dixon line approach to prove a point, than its not even worth arguing with you any further than that.
 
Old 04-24-2011, 11:08 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,180 posts, read 12,760,604 times
Reputation: 1603
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDguy99 View Post
You never said they had to be outside of the northeast. You think Maryland is in the northeast anyway, don't you? I'm not arguing with something so foolish on Easter Sunday- anyone with half a mind realizes there are plenty of cities inside and outside the northeast that are more like New York than Baltimore is. If you can't figure out 12 of these cities, then you need to do more traveling.

Actually I agree with gwillyphilly. Although I don't think any city can compare to NYC, Baltimore does have more similarities than most. When you leave Manhattan, there are many neighborhoods in NYC that are almost identical to Baltimore. It would be interesting to see your list of those that you think are more similar.
 
Old 04-24-2011, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 954,975 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
If your one of those types of people who relies heavily on the outdated mason dixon line approach to prove a point, than its not even worth arguing with you any further than that.
I never said Baltimore was in the South or Northeast, just that I do not understand why you are saying that I cannot list cities I find more similar to NYC than Baltimore if they are in the Northeast when you yourself are saying Baltimore is a northeastern city. Why can't I list northeastern cities I find similar to New York? Afraid I would blow your whole "Baltimore is more similar to NY than any other city" claim? Sorry- the majority of cities I have in mind are in the Northeast. Out of any city that COULD be labeled as in the South (yes, Baltimore IS in the south to some people), Baltimore would be the most similar to NY by far. However, if you are talking about cities in the ENTIRE nation, Baltimore doesn't even crack the top ten. I would venture to guess that I have been in or lived in more northeastern cities than anyone on this board and am very aware of which places are like a given place. I also take issue with anyone who claims Baltimore is an entirely northeastern city. Sorry, I have experienced the true Northeast- and Baltimore is not a true northeastern city. At its founding, Baltimore was solidly in the South. There was no doubt. You cannot argue this. Only later did it evolve into a mixed entity that we know today as a mid-atlantic city. This is an accurate term. The city will never be truly northeastern. History is a huge part of identity and no one can change Baltimore's early history. Pre-1870s, Baltimore and New York were MILES apart in history and culture. Nary a similarity was shared between the two other than both being important port cities. Only later did some urban similarities begin to evolve, and I would argue even they are negligible today. At first glance, I can see how the two may seem similar, but nothing could be further from the truth. For someone who has lived in both places, it becomes apparent that even the similarities these cities share are not rooted in the same reasons. Much of the similarities can be found in any large urban city. Both have areas of extreme poverty, but everything from the reasons to the demographics of this situation are different. You've got entirely different cultural and ethnic foundations in each city, different architecture, much different urban planning, extremely different transit systems, city governments that work nothing alike, and substantially different cultural cornerstones - it's just an entirely different animal and I believe history, the sheer size difference, race relations, and population disparity has much to do with all of it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonjj View Post
Actually I agree with gwillyphilly. Although I don't think any city can compare to NYC, Baltimore does have more similarities than most.
It definitely does not have more similarities than most if you are talking about the northeast. If talking bout the south, then yes. There are a a PLETHORA of cities that compare to NYC (leaving out the obvious size disparities). I won't list smaller cities that I believe compare to individual boroughs, etc, but these are some off the bat that compare to NYC as a whole in character and appearance [barring obvious size differences] (bold are top 3 picks):



Pennsylvania:
- PHILADELPHIA

Illinios:
- CHICAGO

New Jersey:
- NEWARK
- TRENTON

Massachusetts:
- BOSTON

California:
- SAN FRANCISCO

Washington:
- SEATTLE



Not from experience, but suspect to be so:

California:
- LOS ANGELES (not from direct observation- will be going this summer and will see if my perception rings true)

Michigan:
- DETROIT (obviously I am speaking about industrialization and urban landscapes with this example- not cultural.)


I'm NOT going to expand on each one to explain why. All I can say is spend some lengthy visits in each one and you should be able to draw the comparisons. Go ahead and tear apart each example, if you wish, but I will say in MY experience and opinion that all of the cities listed are more similar to NY than Baltimore is.
 
Old 04-25-2011, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,180 posts, read 12,760,604 times
Reputation: 1603
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDguy99 View Post
I never said Baltimore was in the South or Northeast, just that I do not understand why you are saying that I cannot list cities I find more similar to NYC than Baltimore if they are in the Northeast when you yourself are saying Baltimore is a northeastern city. Why can't I list northeastern cities I find similar to New York? Afraid I would blow your whole "Baltimore is more similar to NY than any other city" claim? Sorry- the majority of cities I have in mind are in the Northeast. Out of any city that COULD be labeled as in the South (yes, Baltimore IS in the south to some people), Baltimore would be the most similar to NY by far. However, if you are talking about cities in the ENTIRE nation, Baltimore doesn't even crack the top ten. I would venture to guess that I have been in or lived in more northeastern cities than anyone on this board and am very aware of which places are like a given place. I also take issue with anyone who claims Baltimore is an entirely northeastern city. Sorry, I have experienced the true Northeast- and Baltimore is not a true northeastern city. At its founding, Baltimore was solidly in the South. There was no doubt. You cannot argue this. Only later did it evolve into a mixed entity that we know today as a mid-atlantic city. This is an accurate term. The city will never be truly northeastern. History is a huge part of identity and no one can change Baltimore's early history. Pre-1870s, Baltimore and New York were MILES apart in history and culture. Nary a similarity was shared between the two other than both being important port cities. Only later did some urban similarities begin to evolve, and I would argue even they are negligible today. At first glance, I can see how the two may seem similar, but nothing could be further from the truth. For someone who has lived in both places, it becomes apparent that even the similarities these cities share are not rooted in the same reasons. Much of the similarities can be found in any large urban city. Both have areas of extreme poverty, but everything from the reasons to the demographics of this situation are different. You've got entirely different cultural and ethnic foundations in each city, different architecture, much different urban planning, extremely different transit systems, city governments that work nothing alike, and substantially different cultural cornerstones - it's just an entirely different animal and I believe history, the sheer size difference, race relations, and population disparity has much to do with all of it.

It definitely does not have more similarities than most if you are talking about the northeast. If talking bout the south, then yes. There are a a PLETHORA of cities that compare to NYC (leaving out the obvious size disparities). I won't list smaller cities that I believe compare to individual boroughs, etc, but these are some off the bat that compare to NYC as a whole in character and appearance [barring obvious size differences] (bold are top 3 picks):



Pennsylvania:
- PHILADELPHIA

Illinios:
- CHICAGO

New Jersey:
- NEWARK
- TRENTON

Massachusetts:
- BOSTON

California:
- SAN FRANCISCO

Washington:
- SEATTLE



Not from experience, but suspect to be so:

California:
- LOS ANGELES (not from direct observation- will be going this summer and will see if my perception rings true)

Michigan:
- DETROIT (obviously I am speaking about industrialization and urban landscapes with this example- not cultural.)


I'm NOT going to expand on each one to explain why. All I can say is spend some lengthy visits in each one and you should be able to draw the comparisons. Go ahead and tear apart each example, if you wish, but I will say in MY experience and opinion that all of the cities listed are more similar to NY than Baltimore is.

I agree with Philly, the Jersey/Connecticut cities, Boston, parts of SF, definitely downtown Chicago.
Seattly:nope. And they would probably protest that more than you with Baltimore. Detroit: nope. I lived there. Nothing like anywhere in NYC.
 
Old 04-25-2011, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 954,975 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonjj View Post
I agree with Philly, the Jersey/Connecticut cities, Boston, parts of SF, definitely downtown Chicago.
Seattly:nope. And they would probably protest that more than you with Baltimore. Detroit: nope. I lived there. Nothing like anywhere in NYC.
Was not sure about Detroit. Seattle- definitely the LEAST similar on my top list. I still see more of a similarity than Baltimore in many ways. Maybe it was just my perception - but this entire subject is subjective after all. Thinking now, Seattle should probably have been left out and probably fits more in with "smaller cities" that emulate a facet of NYC better than Baltimore. It was included probably because I have been there, and being such a big city and nearly 1 am when I posted the response, didn't want to leave it out entirely. When I was there, the demographics (albeit much less diverse and whiter than NYC) struck me as young, cultured, "hipster" - reminded me of areas in NYC where this old fart didn't fit in at all. The cafes, the music and art venues, and BARS especially - all much less blue-collar and more cultural and hip. The pace is - (slower wouldn't be the word for me) - more "relaxed"? in Seattle than NY. I certainly found that to be a nice change though, seeing as my visit was years ago when I actually lived in North Jersey. I also happened upon a park that reminded me a lot of Battery Park. Overall it just seemed more alive than Baltimore (this is not a bashing!)- something I associate with NY.
 
Old 04-25-2011, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
4,180 posts, read 12,760,604 times
Reputation: 1603
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDguy99 View Post
Was not sure about Detroit. Seattle- definitely the LEAST similar on my top list. I still see more of a similarity than Baltimore in many ways. Maybe it was just my perception - but this entire subject is subjective after all. Thinking now, Seattle should probably have been left out and probably fits more in with "smaller cities" that emulate a facet of NYC better than Baltimore. It was included probably because I have been there, and being such a big city and nearly 1 am when I posted the response, didn't want to leave it out entirely. When I was there, the demographics (albeit much less diverse and whiter than NYC) struck me as young, cultured, "hipster" - reminded me of areas in NYC where this old fart didn't fit in at all. The cafes, the music and art venues, and BARS especially - all much less blue-collar and more cultural and hip. The pace is - (slower wouldn't be the word for me) - more "relaxed"? in Seattle than NY. I certainly found that to be a nice change though, seeing as my visit was years ago when I actually lived in North Jersey. I also happened upon a park that reminded me a lot of Battery Park. Overall it just seemed more alive than Baltimore (this is not a bashing!)- something I associate with NY.
I agree. I think Seattle is a great city and almost lived there had it not been so far from family/folks. The area around Seattle-water, mountains, forests. I loved that.
When I say Baltimore is similar to NYC or at least more similar than other cities, I am not thinking Manhattan. I am referring to the outer burroughs of the city.
 
Old 04-25-2011, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 954,975 times
Reputation: 175
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonjj View Post
I agree. I think Seattle is a great city and almost lived there had it not been so far from family/folks. The area around Seattle-water, mountains, forests. I loved that.
When I say Baltimore is similar to NYC or at least more similar than other cities, I am not thinking Manhattan. I am referring to the outer burroughs of the city.
I could see that, but even then only certain areas of Baltimore City could be compared to small areas of NY so I don't think it's a fair comparison. Overall, I don't see the similarities as a whole. You can't compare a city to NY and say, "Oh but we have to exclude Manhattan". Without Manhattan, NY isn't NY. I wouldn't compare NY to anything while excluding Manhattan. The places I list, with the exception of Seattle (I'm a big fan of the outlying forests, too!), are comparisons of an entire city to an entire city- where you can draw city-wide parallels on everything from similar urban planning to like-minded transit and culture. This can be done with Philly, Chicago, etc, etc. It just cannot be done when comparing Baltimore as a whole to NYC as a complete entity that includes Manhattan.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top