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Old 03-12-2012, 01:16 PM
 
2,893 posts, read 3,404,574 times
Reputation: 4072

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"Bigot" is a strong word, intended to be insulting, and intended to insinuate some kind of moral shortcoming. I don't like the word because I personally view calling someone a "bigot" on par with addressing someone else by using the "N-word." The intent is to convey total disrespect for the person so addressed in both cases. Regarding the author of the book, who throws this word around liberally: I believe that he is pandering to the professional grievance industry (people who make their livings from racial division) and that he seems to be a typical modern-day journalist -- "if it bleeds, it leads."

That notwithstanding, the question is this: was the white reaction bigotry, or was it rational fear?

I hold that it was rational fear. The Moynihan report of 1965 calls Black culture of that time period "a tangled web of pathologies." I lived in the City as the transition unfolded, and I agree. (Aside -- Moynihan was asst. sec. of labor under JFK and LBJ, and anything but a racist or bigot himself.) The "tangled web" refers to the statistical overrepresentation of violent crime, illegitimate children, no-parent families, gang activity, drug use and trade, unwillingness to take advantage of educational opportunity, lack of industriousness, and related matters. One can see that, in fact, this dysfunctional culture has become what we see as the predominant culture in places like today's inner-city Baltimore. To pretend that the situation is otherwise precludes ever making progress away from it.

This is not to theorize about why these conditions developed or who was responsible; rather, the point is that these conditions were the facts on the ground at the time, and that the fleeing whites were rationally afraid rather than bigoted. Many of these white families suffered greatly ($$$) as the result of moving house at the worst possible time, and disrupting social networks which had been built over generations. In a very real sense, they were the victims. One of my grandmothers died in poverty as the result of blockbusting near Memorial Stadium.

As to who was responsible . . . I believe that slavery was the greatest evil and tragedy in American history. Many black people came to Baltimore from the South. Their ancestors were taken against their will from Africa to be exploited and brutalized for the benefit of a tiny fraction of the white southern population. They were never educated properly, and were set free to fend for themselves, completely unequipped to do so, in 1865. Perhaps this is why Moynihan's tangled web came to pass. To me, however, it is important to remember that the vast majority of southern whites also suffered as the result of the plantation culture. Anyone interested in this aspect might enjoy reading "The Mind of the South," by W. J. Cash. The south was never able to develop an educated population or a normal, viable economy during the plantation era, and was led into destitution by the Civil War, and then into the textile-mill era, and then up to Baltimore.

I don't think that I am a bigot or racist, or all that backward, and I hope that I have not offended anyone in my attempt to refute this revisionist account of history. Things do change over time, sometimes for the better. I voted for President Obama in 2008, and most certainly will again in 2012
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Old 03-12-2012, 03:57 PM
 
Location: Maryland
18,563 posts, read 15,788,474 times
Reputation: 6259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
"Bigot" is a strong word, intended to be insulting, and intended to insinuate some kind of moral shortcoming. I don't like the word because I personally view calling someone a "bigot" on par with addressing someone else by using the "N-word." The intent is to convey total disrespect for the person so addressed in both cases. Regarding the author of the book, who throws this word around liberally: I believe that he is pandering to the professional grievance industry (people who make their livings from racial division) and that he seems to be a typical modern-day journalist -- "if it bleeds, it leads."

That notwithstanding, the question is this: was the white reaction bigotry, or was it rational fear?

I hold that it was rational fear. The Moynihan report of 1965 calls Black culture of that time period "a tangled web of pathologies." I lived in the City as the transition unfolded, and I agree. (Aside -- Moynihan was asst. sec. of labor under JFK and LBJ, and anything but a racist or bigot himself.) The "tangled web" refers to the statistical overrepresentation of violent crime, illegitimate children, no-parent families, gang activity, drug use and trade, unwillingness to take advantage of educational opportunity, lack of industriousness, and related matters. One can see that, in fact, this dysfunctional culture has become what we see as the predominant culture in places like today's inner-city Baltimore. To pretend that the situation is otherwise precludes ever making progress away from it.

This is not to theorize about why these conditions developed or who was responsible; rather, the point is that these conditions were the facts on the ground at the time, and that the fleeing whites were rationally afraid rather than bigoted. Many of these white families suffered greatly ($$$) as the result of moving house at the worst possible time, and disrupting social networks which had been built over generations. In a very real sense, they were the victims. One of my grandmothers died in poverty as the result of blockbusting near Memorial Stadium.

As to who was responsible . . . I believe that slavery was the greatest evil and tragedy in American history. Many black people came to Baltimore from the South. Their ancestors were taken against their will from Africa to be exploited and brutalized for the benefit of a tiny fraction of the white southern population. They were never educated properly, and were set free to fend for themselves, completely unequipped to do so, in 1865. Perhaps this is why Moynihan's tangled web came to pass. To me, however, it is important to remember that the vast majority of southern whites also suffered as the result of the plantation culture. Anyone interested in this aspect might enjoy reading "The Mind of the South," by W. J. Cash. The south was never able to develop an educated population or a normal, viable economy during the plantation era, and was led into destitution by the Civil War, and then into the textile-mill era, and then up to Baltimore.

I don't think that I am a bigot or racist, or all that backward, and I hope that I have not offended anyone in my attempt to refute this revisionist account of history. Things do change over time, sometimes for the better. I voted for President Obama in 2008, and most certainly will again in 2012

As a Black conservative the bolded part is the most objectionable part of your post.
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Old 03-12-2012, 05:13 PM
 
206 posts, read 389,983 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
...
Yeah, it's a real shame that all black people were the same back in 1965. Too bad they all had to be kept out of white areas.
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Old 03-12-2012, 06:17 PM
 
2,893 posts, read 3,404,574 times
Reputation: 4072
Quote:
Originally Posted by remstone View Post
Yeah, it's a real shame that all black people were the same back in 1965. Too bad they all had to be kept out of white areas.
Your attempt at sarcasm makes it hard to understand exactly what you're trying to communicate.
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