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Old 05-17-2011, 03:26 PM
 
2,885 posts, read 3,396,437 times
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Interesting story about City. Thank you all for your responses.
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Old 05-17-2011, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Cheswolde
1,975 posts, read 5,860,038 times
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Default Another new magnet school

One of the biggest under-reported stories in the region is that Baltimore County's public schools, for the first time, are now majority minority. Not majority black but substantially black, with other minorities making up the difference. That puts the city's racial situation in a somewhat different light.
Another story that is developing is that in addition to the historic elite city schools that we have discussed and to the School for the Arts, which has a nationwide reputation, another creativity school is in the works. It will be located in Station North Baltimore Design School | Solving Problems, Envisioning Possibilities, Making the World a Better Place
I, for one, believe that the abolition of the arts and music curricula contribute to the Baltimore public school system's overall problems. That's why the design school is such a welcome addition.
Let me finally clarify something in my previous posts: I stated that I thought City was more elite than Poly. No one has called me on this yet, but I made that statement only because so many gatekeepers and decision-makers in public life came from City. Mayor Kurt Schmoke, Larry Gibson, the UMd law school lawyer, state Senator Curt Anderson among black notables. Poly, having a more math-focused curriculum, produced an equal number of people who made a difference. But instead of politics and public life, many gravitated to the technical field.
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Old 05-19-2011, 09:13 AM
 
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Barante,

Thank you for your very interesting posts, which have helped explain a lot about the city's history to me. I will read the books you suggest when I have time, but you've filled in a lot of information about why the city is so segregated.

It's exiting to hear about the new design school. This is the first I've heard of it.

I want to point out, as a parent of a child in BCPS, that the city is starting a new push for gifted education in the elementary schools, something that it does not have now. It's a welcome development that Alonzo is putting resources in this area. I believe a strong gifted program will encourage many parents to put their kids in city public schools instead of private schools, as well as serving the many gifted children now in BCPS who are under-challenged in school but whose parents can't afford to send them to private school.

I also want to point out that my children do not see race the way I and my peers do. We grew up in a segregated world where barriers kept blacks, jews, asians, any non-white minority, as well as women, out of many professions, places, trades, schools, you name it. Our children, on the other hand, are not growing up in that world. They see a black President, and it seems to them, well, like, so what? Whereas I see it as amazing!! We bought our middle class house from an African American family, something absolutely unthinkable to my parents, who lived their entire lives in completely white neighborhoods. My kids think having a black lawyer for a next-door neighbor is normal. When I was a child, I never heard of a black lawyer. My kids think it's normal to have friends of all races, religions, etc. I hope that Baltimore's persistent segregation will not change my children's and their friends attitudes toward race, which for them doesn't seem to exist. They don't see beliefs, attitudes, socioeconomic status, even culture as related to how people look.
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Old 05-19-2011, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Cheswolde
1,975 posts, read 5,860,038 times
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Default Thursday, May 19

Tonight at 7 p.m. at the Village Learning Place, 2521 St. Paul St., Baltimore. Where Do We Go from Here? The 20th Anniversary of The Baltimore Book: New Views of Local History. This ground-breaking look at Baltimore labor, African-American, and women's history is still in print after 20 years!
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Old 05-19-2011, 12:47 PM
 
2,885 posts, read 3,396,437 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baltomod View Post
Barante,


I also want to point out that my children do not see race the way I and my peers do. We grew up in a segregated world where barriers kept blacks, jews, asians, any non-white minority, as well as women, out of many professions, places, trades, schools, you name it. Our children, on the other hand, are not growing up in that world. They see a black President, and it seems to them, well, like, so what? Whereas I see it as amazing!!
We in fact have a Black President. I'm a White male, a Protestant, an old goat, "straight," a row-house native of Baltimore now living in the South (in other words, the enemy of all that is good), and I voted for him without any hesitation, and will almost certainly vote for him again. That you see this as "amazing" indicates that your core assumptions of brazen, rampant racism, sexism, anti-whatever-ism, and general ism-ism are overblown! It is not "amazing" that a Black is President. Rather, your assumption regarding racism is simply WRONG!!!

Last edited by Hamish Forbes; 05-19-2011 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 05-19-2011, 01:27 PM
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690 posts, read 1,587,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hamish Forbes View Post
We in fact have a Black President. I'm a White male, a Protestant, an old goat, "straight," a row-house native of Baltimore now living in the South (in other words, the enemy of all that is good), and I voted for him without any hesitation, and will almost certainly vote for him again. That you see this as "amazing" indicates that your core assumptions of brazen, rampant racism, sexism, anti-whatever-ism, and general ism-ism are overblown! It is not "amazing" that a Black is President. Rather, your assumption regarding racism is simply WRONG!!!
i don't think she meant any harm. i can see where she's coming from. i think she meant amazing in the sense that, given her history and background, it is amazing (to her...her opinion) that we've come to a point in america where people voted with their head and not their heart.
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Old 03-02-2012, 10:37 AM
 
Location: The Bay and Maryland
1,362 posts, read 3,080,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDude1 View Post
Why is the world so segregated?

I live in the deep south and it is the same way and when I visit NYC it is the same way. If anything, there are no truly integrated areas of the US. As a matter of fact, the upper class are more inclined to stay within their own group, intermingling happens more with the lower classes and even then it is not common. People have a tendency to stay with their own group, no reason to put one area in a corner about this, it is common everywhere.

Do not let anyone from a foreign country convince you the grass is greener on the other side. Western Europe is equally as segregated as the US and if not even more.
Everywhere is socially segregated, but not everywhere in America is racially segregated. Someone from the East Coast who has never been out West could not fathom how integrated it is many urban areas of Northern California. I'm originally from the Bay Area which has some of the most racially integrated communities in America. Some of the most ghetto parts of East Oakland are equally Black, Asian and Hispanic. Take the San Antonio district in Oakland (aka the "Murder Dubs") for example:

OF RACE AND PLACE: San Antonio/Oakland / Flavors meld in community east of lake

http://www.city-data.com/neighborhoo...akland-CA.html

My old neighborhood in southwest San Francisco in Ingleside Heights in a hood Black people know as "Lakeview" is also equally integrated and diverse:

http://www.city-data.com/neighborhoo...ncisco-CA.html

The reason these urban neighborhoods in the Bay are more diverse is because California is the lowest entry point for poor Asians and Hispanics fresh from the third world. Baltimore is NOT. Baltimore, and Maryland in general, is dominated by Blacks and Whites. The influx of Asians and Hispanics in Maryland is a recent phenomena and is not deeply historical like it is in the Bay. Hispanics and Asians are largely statistically insignificant in Baltimore. Also, Blacks are much more of a minority in the Bay Area and California. Maryland is one of the Blackest states with Black people representing nearly 30% of the entire state's population. Even the Blackest ghetto neighborhoods in the Bay are only about 50% Black because there literally aren't enough Black people around. Black people in the Bay have no choice but to live around and associate with Asians/Pacific Islanders and or Latinos. This is not the case in Baltimore.

At the end of the day, Baltimore is a text book case of White flight. There is a reason why there are museums of industry in Baltimore. When White folks packed up and left, they took all the jobs and prestige with them and relocated to the suburbs. The same thing happened in Detroit and every other ghetto city in America. Blacks moved to the cities from rural areas for a better life only to have White folks hightailing for the fresh newly built suburbs and shutting down factories in the city left and right. As a result, Blacks and Whites have always been largely separate in Baltimore and in Maryland, period. There are few exceptions like the planned community of Columbia, Maryland in Howard County and Silver Spring and other pockets of Montgomery County. PG County and DC are profoundly segregated as well. Maryland has a deep history of segregation. An older guy I know says they used to call Maryland "Little Georgia" because it was so segregated.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:46 PM
 
653 posts, read 697,455 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by baltomod View Post
I've lived here for a year now, and I'm still shocked at how segregated the city is. I went to a birthday party at a party place in the county just outside the city limits recently and couldn't believe my eyes. There were mostly groups of white kids with their parents, and every once in a while, there was a group of black kids and their parents. This place isn't cheap for kids birthday parties, so I'm assuming most of the families have the same financial status. But why are these groups so separate? I didn't see any mixed groups. Why is this?

I see this everywhere I go in the city. I went to a play at a private school in the city, and everyone in the audience was white. The same day I saw a performance at a public school in the city, and almost everyone in the audience was black.

I drive past Poly almost every afternoon just as the kids are coming out of school. I see them walk past my car, and looking at their faces, they look smart. So how come almost all of them are black? If these are the smartest kids in the city, how come the smartest white kids aren't going to Poly?

My neighborhood is mostly white. But a few blocks away the neighborhood is mostly black. It's as though an invisible line is drawn, and boom, everybody stays on either side of the line, according to how they look.

I'm new here, so I know very little about Baltimore's history. But it seems odd to me that no one talks about this eerie segregation. I understand that the poorer areas are mostly black, and the richer areas are mostly white, yet when I see hoardes of kids coming out of Poly, I think: these kids are not poor, so why are they going to school only with other black kids?

It all seems very sick and weird to me. In this day and age, when there are no laws keeping any groups out of any school, place or profession, why is this city not more racially integrated?
I can't speak for the entire city, I can only speak from my own personal experience growing up here.

I went to school very close to the city/county line (about 2 miles) so we had a nice mixed set of kids in my school (not all of one or the other, a nice balance).

I found it interesting that I had a lot of white friends, but also a lot of black, latin, etc friends, yet a lunch time, no matter how much I tried to convince them, the blacks, latins, etc, sat with their respective groups.

In addition to my girlfriends, one of my closest friends was a black boy. He and I even went to the school dance together (as friends), but at lunch, still back to the tables with the other black kids he went.

I almost felt like it was elective reverse discrimination. Like they didn't want to sit with the whites. It was very odd, for sure.
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Old 03-02-2012, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,864 posts, read 7,064,327 times
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I haven't read this whole thread but I think it really depends on the places you go.

Yes, you will find many schools very segregated but I just moved to Owings Mill and my neighborhood is a good mix of black and white families. Myold neighborhood in Mt. Washington had everything: black, whie, Filipinio, Asian and Indian even in the same buildings.

Certain hangout areas like Canton, Federal Hill and Fells point you also see a mix of different races. Mostly white but others in there as well. I think some people aren't as good about socializing with others. I know many blacks that just prefer to hang with blacks. Not my thing but some people are like that.

It depends on people's social circles. At my own housewarming party and a birthday part in the past 2 weeks; all kinds of people but that's who my friends befriend. I'm very comfortable with other races but not everyone is.
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Old 03-02-2012, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Alaska
2,594 posts, read 2,283,460 times
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Baltimore is very segregated, much like my native Philadelphia.

However, I found Harford County to be very integrated, especially Aberdeen and Havre De Grace.

A previous poster made a very true observation regarding the difference between the East Coast (more segregation) and the West Coast (more integration). I know here in Alaska (which is on the West coast and waaay up north) people are not segregated by race but by socioeconomic class, which is an entirely different thread.
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