U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
 
Old 11-05-2011, 06:06 PM
 
Location: BALTIMORE, MD
337 posts, read 485,954 times
Reputation: 172

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by EdwardA View Post
Good points but in order for Baltimore to grow in this hypercompetitve region it will need inspired political leadership to put the components in place to allow that to happen. I just don't see that on the local level. The Curley Effect is real and until that is smashed to pieces I expect the status qua, siphoning off money from productive corners of the city to the unproductive corners in order for politicians to stay in power. Whatever growth this region experiences will be largely based in the suburbs IMHO.

DC is the Nation's capital it will always be a nexus for capital, there is also a strong health care industry, high tech corridor in Northern Virginia and a host of other industries that could pick up any cuts in federal spending.

Also one thing to its credit local leadership got right in DC is its property tax structure. It punishes holders of vacant properties while simultaneously encouraging capital investment in real property this helps create the rejuvenation the city is seeing.

Besides the cuts would have to be in the Defense industry to make a real impact and even if the GOP comes to power on a Tea Party wave I have a feeling the DoD will be spared.
I DON'T THINK YOU KNOW BALTIMORE VERY WELL!! The problem with Baltimore's leadership is that the money from productive corridors of the city is staying in the productive corridors of the city!
The money is not being sent to the less fortunate places that need it, that's the problem!!! I don't mean in the form of welfare and handouts I mean in the form of job training and educational programs that will create a working productive citizen!! Our local leadership Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake while not my favorite is an O'Malley Pawn and she is all for the advancement of downtown Baltimore and surrounding areas, but the less fortunate parts of the city are ignored and allowed to decay while downtown Baltimore continues to flourish and grow
(UNNECESSARILY due to loss of population but it remains a tourist destination)

And HAD SRB not been re-elected Mayoral Candidate Jody Landers proposed to adopt Washington D.C.'s tax structure which IMHO is the simple reason he should have been elected!!! Despite its Negatives the only good thing Baltimore has to boast about is its strong job market
Johns Hopkins Hospital is the #1 Hospital in the world and employs about 25,000 people in the Baltimore area, and not to mention Legg Mason one of the worlds largest asset management firms, Constellation Energy, and Under Armour!! So Baltimore is definitely a PRIVATE SECTOR BASED economy!! Government cutbacks would mainly hurt Baltimore suburbs, Woodlawn, MD specifically!!

If you are looking for a home in Baltimore and want return on your investment!! Buy a home near Johns Hopkins Hospital (The #1 source of Gentrification in Baltimore) or Federal Hill which isn't really cheap!!!

Baltimore City will do to Anne Arundel County, What Washington D.C. has done to Prince Georges!!

Last edited by bmorefella; 11-05-2011 at 06:23 PM..
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-05-2011, 06:29 PM
 
Location: BALTIMORE, MD
337 posts, read 485,954 times
Reputation: 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwarda View Post
check on that account baltimore has been bleeding residents since what the 50s? Also it's not so much competition with other cities baltimore needs to worry about but its own suburbs. Where taxes are lower, crime lower and schools are generally better. For the average middle class familiy with 2.2 kids it's a no brainer. Baltimore city is not even in the running. That leaves the wealthy, die hard urbanists and those who are too poor to leave. Not exactly the building blocks of a long term vibrant city.
agreed but that's exactly how d.c. Feels about nova, you cant stop suburban growth, you can only keep up, baltimore has yet to start a mass wave of gentrification like d.c. But its coming in the form of johns hopkins hospital!!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2011, 06:45 PM
 
Location: BALTIMORE, MD
337 posts, read 485,954 times
Reputation: 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Is this true though? I haven't crunched any numbers, but it seems to me that a $200K home in Baltimore + BMore's "high property tax" is still cheaper in the long run than a $500K home in DC + DCs property tax. Especially to someone earning a DC salary. It might not be that "good of a deal" to someone making a Baltimore salary, perhaps. I would guess that someone with DC money would be able to extend that money further in a Baltimore home regardless of high the property tax is here.

Of course other factors come into play, such as how much of a down payment was made, but like I wrote, it appears to me as if Baltimore's property tax should not be an issue to someone working in DC.

Honestly, I do not think DCs lower property tax rate is a factor in DCs boom, as it is still an expensive place to live. DCs housing market is booming, and simply put, people are buying into it not because it is cheaper than BMore (which in the long run it isn't), but because property in the DC area is one of the few markets at the moment that can still be considered an investment (it will definitely be worth more in the future).
lol WELL LAST I CHECKED Here in Baltimore we all get paid in the same currency as D.C. but I et your point!! Baltimore housing is a ood option for any individual regardless of income if you make 80 k a year working in D.C. you may be able to get a 250 thousand dollar house in Baltimore instead of a 250 thousand dollar condominium in D.C.!! And if you don't think property in Baltimore is an investment then your a fool!! I have no problem with D.C. but I have a lot of friends in the Washington area who are simply "HOUSE POOR" Its nice to have a 800 thousand dollar house in D.C. but if I can get the same house in Baltimore for 600, drive a Mercedes and go on vacation twice a year while watching my savings grow!!! Ill take option 2!! Oh and just so you know there are also people in Baltimore with high salary careers!!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 09:12 AM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
7,504 posts, read 14,627,148 times
Reputation: 4704
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmorefella View Post

If you are looking for a home in Baltimore and want return on your investment!! Buy a home near Johns Hopkins Hospital (The #1 source of Gentrification in Baltimore) or Federal Hill which isn't really cheap!!!
Going towards Fells Point is ok, but the other areas around Johns Hopkins are not so desireable and I don't see any signs of gentrification around JH.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmorefella View Post
lol WELL LAST I CHECKED Here in Baltimore we all get paid in the same currency as D.C. but I et your point!! Baltimore housing is a ood option for any individual regardless of income if you make 80 k a year working in D.C. you may be able to get a 250 thousand dollar house in Baltimore instead of a 250 thousand dollar condominium in D.C.!! And if you don't think property in Baltimore is an investment then your a fool!! I have no problem with D.C. but I have a lot of friends in the Washington area who are simply "HOUSE POOR" Its nice to have a 800 thousand dollar house in D.C. but if I can get the same house in Baltimore for 600, drive a Mercedes and go on vacation twice a year while watching my savings grow!!! Ill take option 2!! Oh and just so you know there are also people in Baltimore with high salary careers!!
I was thinking of square footage for square footage, but I suppose price points would work, too.

I never said that property in Baltimore was not an investment, I said that I do not see the point in buying property anywhere for the purpose of developing equity. In my opinion, I believe that people should buy homes because they want to live there. Nothing more, nothing less. If that property happens to appreciate in value, cool. It just shouldn't be a factor.

I'll put it to you like this: who would you rather have living in your community; people who love and want to live in the neighborhood? Or some ******* who is just waiting for the payday on his house?

Yes, I know there are people in Baltimore with high salary careers who work within the city. Did I say otherwise? What cannot be disputed is the average salary in D.C. is higher than the average salary in Baltimore. D.C. has the highest median household salary of every major U.S. city. Baltimore's median is what, half that at the least (depending on whose figures you look at).
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 11:46 AM
 
1,174 posts, read 1,399,891 times
Reputation: 500
Good points bmore fella, but not only are the bad neighborhoods ignored, so are the nice ones. Many of the great things that have gone on around Patterson park and fed hill are from community work, private donations, and incredible lobbying by the neighborhood groups.

If I were to invest in a "place to live" I would probably go fo the Station North area. I've never seen a rundown area with so much huge stuff in the works, and so much optimism and spirit coming from it. I guess being near two colleges, near rails and trains, and the spirit of artists goes a long way.

I really wish Jody Landers would have run for City Council President. He probably would have won, and he is the smartest real estate/neighborhood/tax structure guy around, and having that seat would make him mayor soon.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 02:29 PM
 
Location: BALTIMORE, MD
337 posts, read 485,954 times
Reputation: 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Going towards Fells Point is ok, but the other areas around Johns Hopkins are not so desireable and I don't see any signs of gentrification around JH.

I was thinking of square footage for square footage, but I suppose price points would work, too.

I never said that property in Baltimore was not an investment, I said that I do not see the point in buying property anywhere for the purpose of developing equity. In my opinion, I believe that people should buy homes because they want to live there. Nothing more, nothing less. If that property happens to appreciate in value, cool. It just shouldn't be a factor.

I'll put it to you like this: who would you rather have living in your community; people who love and want to live in the neighborhood? Or some ******* who is just waiting for the payday on his house?

Yes, I know there are people in Baltimore with high salary careers who work within the city. Did I say otherwise? What cannot be disputed is the average salary in D.C. is higher than the average salary in Baltimore. D.C. has the highest median household salary of every major U.S. city. Baltimore's median is what, half that at the least (depending on whose figures you look at).
Average income in Washington D.C. Is higher than the average income in almost every city as it should be due to the cost of living.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 02:44 PM
 
Location: BALTIMORE, MD
337 posts, read 485,954 times
Reputation: 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by KLynch10 View Post
Good points bmore fella, but not only are the bad neighborhoods ignored, so are the nice ones. Many of the great things that have gone on around Patterson park and fed hill are from community work, private donations, and incredible lobbying by the neighborhood groups.

If I were to invest in a "place to live" I would probably go fo the Station North area. I've never seen a rundown area with so much huge stuff in the works, and so much optimism and spirit coming from it. I guess being near two colleges, near rails and trains, and the spirit of artists goes a long way.

I really wish Jody Landers would have run for City Council President. He probably would have won, and he is the smartest real estate/neighborhood/tax structure guy around, and having that seat would make him mayor soon.

Yes Jody landers would have made an excellent city council president....way better than Bernard jack young..the city will be fine as soon as we give it to someone who's about economic development!! And the gentrification by Hopkins is pretty serious I mean Hopkins Medical not the University!! Hopkins medical has destroyed two large projects and dozens of row homes to build its bio park and property value in the area has gone up drastically!! I have a relative who bought a home off of broadway for 130 in the 90's and her next door neighbor just sold for 385k and patterson park is very nice and as of recently has gotten a large influx of Hispanic residents!!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 03:58 PM
 
7,817 posts, read 5,225,091 times
Reputation: 1379
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmorefella View Post
Yes Jody landers would have made an excellent city council president....way better than Bernard jack young..the city will be fine as soon as we give it to someone who's about economic development!! And the gentrification by Hopkins is pretty serious I mean Hopkins Medical not the University!! Hopkins medical has destroyed two large projects and dozens of row homes to build its bio park and property value in the area has gone up drastically!! I have a relative who bought a home off of broadway for 130 in the 90's and her next door neighbor just sold for 385k and patterson park is very nice and as of recently has gotten a large influx of Hispanic residents!!
Wow....$385,000? Im from D.C. but my grandmothers house is in East Baltimore near Edison Hwy and E. Preston. Our house is only worth around 90,000. That house on Broadway couldn't have been appraised for $385,000. They must have just had somebody drop big time cash for it. Those houses aren't worth that kind of money right now. If they are headed that direction, it will be big for the neighborhood my grandmothers house is in which doesn't look anything like those run down area's around Hopkins.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 04:05 PM
 
1,174 posts, read 1,399,891 times
Reputation: 500
I agree about Hopkins, it is a pretty incredible renovation and is just getting started. They basically are just leveling a ghetto. The immediate area is starting to get nice, and it will be about blending it into Patterson park, and cleaning up stuff immediately to the west, and east (will be tough). I'm sure Douglass homes and Perkins will come down within a few years. I'm hearing gateway at Washington hill is back on, that will be huge.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 04:09 PM
 
1,174 posts, read 1,399,891 times
Reputation: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDAllstar View Post
Wow....$385,000? Im from D.C. but my grandmothers house is in East Baltimore near Edison Hwy and E. Preston. Our house is only worth around 90,000. That house on Broadway couldn't have been appraised for $385,000. They must have just had somebody drop big time cash for it. Those houses aren't worth that kind of money right now. If they are headed that direction, it will be big for the neighborhood my grandmothers house is in which doesn't look anything like those run down area's around Hopkins.
There a Butchers Hill homes that go for way more than that, a lot of the houses are huge with stunning views. Belair Edison is not nice, and has suffered the largest bubble depreciation of any city neighborhood.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top