U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-10-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,210,754 times
Reputation: 1191

Advertisements

Finally had a chance to walk through there on Sunday to take some pictures for a grad school project. It's an almost surreal setting especially when set against Stirling St. The people hanging around were friendly and open to talk about the decline of the area. Could this area get redeveloped?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-10-2012, 08:49 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 10,604,619 times
Reputation: 3092
Sure it could. I think step one would be to develop the massive parking lot adjacent to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2012, 09:09 AM
 
1,175 posts, read 2,397,961 times
Reputation: 535
Apparently the City and this architect have a "Vision".
Marks, Thomas Architects | Portfolio (http://www.marks-thomas.com/portfolio.cfm?projectID=45&subcatid=6&catid=5 - broken link)

The problem with most of the parts of East Baltimore close to 83, is there is so many old Public Housing complexes. I know they just tore one down close to Old Town, but there is plenty more in that area. So any investor would have to consider it's surrounding area before dumping millions into something. Privately owned homes can be bought out, public housing is a whole different beaurocracy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2012, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,210,754 times
Reputation: 1191
I did find it interesting that the city currently owns all of Old Town Mall on the SW side of the development. On the NE side there are a few active businesses but much of it is privately owned.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-10-2012, 09:35 AM
 
1,175 posts, read 2,397,961 times
Reputation: 535
The area around Dunbar's Football Field is a mess. Latrobe Homes and that ugly white tower. I think all of East Baltimore is a Wild Card because Hopkins is the most important Company in this state, and I know the City and State want the area around it to be as nice as possible. I think you'll definitely see these areas improved and re-invented.... hopefully sooner than later!

Somewhat in the same area, I think you'll see a lot of shopping go in at the Washington Hill Overlook project that is going to start soon, and that surrounding area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
673 posts, read 802,585 times
Reputation: 269
why would you want it redeveloped its part of baltimores history. Its the first mall black were allowed to go to in the city. I think it should stay but be remodeled and have use for the community. There are no current plans to tear it down by the way. If you redevelop it all your doing is driving up the housing prices in the surrounding area and forcing the current residents in the area to relocate which is trrible because many have been living there for years. Old town shpuld stay a baltimore land mark. A piece of history.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-11-2012, 09:46 PM
 
251 posts, read 602,052 times
Reputation: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmoreboy25 View Post
I think it should stay but be remodeled and have use for the community.
That IS redevelopment. You've kinda just defined the term. And yes, it does increase property values of the area, that is a good thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2012, 11:40 AM
 
201 posts, read 503,402 times
Reputation: 59
The Public Housing around Old Town Mall is the albatross. It is time to end Public Housing as we know it. It is a failed social experiment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-12-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
1,759 posts, read 4,210,754 times
Reputation: 1191
Stirling St makes for an interesting comparison. The Orleans St part of OTM is owned by the city.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-13-2012, 07:53 AM
 
921 posts, read 967,615 times
Reputation: 1763
Quote:
Originally Posted by ltong1009 View Post
The Public Housing around Old Town Mall is the albatross. It is time to end Public Housing as we know it. It is a failed social experiment.

I can agree that public housing, as we know it, has failed.

The reality is poor people need options or society will be adding to the homeless situation.

Do you have any suggestions as to other options for low income and the elderly that have been living in that area for decades?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland > Baltimore
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:55 PM.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top