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Old 09-11-2017, 05:33 PM
 
1,079 posts, read 1,435,680 times
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I’m very surprised not to find an Amazon HQ2 thread in the Baltimore forum, given how so many business articles point to Baltimore as a strong contender. Yes, I know there’s a CD thread in the MD Washington forum, but that seems primarily centered on Bethesa/College Park/DC/NoVA. http://www.city-data.com/forum/washi...q2-search.html Amazon’s new HQ is a hot topic on C-D and in the business journals. Chicago, Boston, Philly, Atlanta, and Austin are all considered strong contenders. But, there are dark horses such as Charlotte, Minneapolis/St Paul, and Nashville. And Baltimore.
1. Site/building. Amazon is looking for existing buildings of at least 500,000 square feet and total site space of up to 8 million sq ft. It would like the site to be within 30 miles of a population center and within 45 minutes of an international airport. It prefers metro areas with more than 1 million people. Its Seattle headquarters includes 33 buildings totaling 8.1 million sq ft.

2. Capital and operating costs. Amazon is prioritizing “stable and business-friendly regulations and tax structure” in its considerations. The company is seeking out incentives from state and local governments “to offset initial capital outlay and ongoing operational costs.” At its Seattle headquarters, Amazon says it invested $3.7 billion in buildings and infrastructure from 2010 to 2017, and spent another $1.4 billion on utilities and maintenance.

3. Incentives. The company is asking applicants to outline the specific types of incentives they could offer, such as tax credits and relocation grants, as well calculations on the amount of total incentives that could be provided. “The initial and ongoing cost of doing business are critical decision drivers,” the RFP states.

4. Labor force. Hiring 50,000 skilled workers is no easy task, and Amazon wants to make sure its new headquarters is in an area with a readily available pool of talent. The company is prioritizing sites with a “strong university system.” It’s asked cities to provide a list of universities and community colleges with “relevant degrees” plus the number of students to graduate with those degrees over the past three years. Amazon also wants information on computer-science programs in the local and regional K-12 education system.

5. Logistics. Amazon is first and foremost a master of logistics, so it should come as no surprise that the company cares a lot about transportation. Amazon wants on-site access to mass transit—train, subway, or bus—and to be no more than one or two miles from major highways and connecting roads. It wants to be within 45 minutes of an international airport with daily direct flights to Seattle, New York, the San Francisco Bay area, and Washington DC. The company is also asking applicants to identify “all transit options, including bike lanes and pedestrian access” for the proposed site and to rank traffic congestion during peak commuting hours.
6. Time to operations. To begin construction as soon as possible, Amazon wants an outline of the permitting process and approximate timetable ahead of “Phase 1” of the building process—the first 500,000 to 1 million sq ft, for an investment of $300 million to $600 million.

7. Cultural community fit. Like any tech company, Amazon cares about “culture fit.” It defines this as a diverse population, strong higher-education system, and local government that is “eager and willing to work with the company.” Amazon is asking cities to “demonstrate characteristics of this” in their responses. “We encourage testimonials from other large companies,” it adds.

8. Community/quality of life. The new headquarters should be in a place where people want to live. Amazon is interested in daily living and recreational opportunities for people in each proposed metro area. It is also requesting information about housing prices and availability, general cost of living, and crime statistics.

Baltimore fits the bill on most of these.


1. Site/building. Baltimore City is pitching the Port Covington parcel with its 130 acres (a bit of demolition is required ☹)

2. Capital and operating costs. Since Baltimore is so eager to play footsie with developers, they’d likely let Amazon get to third base.

3. Incentives. Above.

4. Labor force. Amazon is not going to pay a six figure salary to every gangbanger hanging out at Mondawin Mall, but there is a massive supply of WashBalt Beltway Bandit staff who would (and do) commute for a good offer on a company with prestigious reputation. There would be tremendous spin off opportunities for local business and the local labor market.

5. Logistics. BWI! Rail! Port of Baltimore! The city public transport quality is in place, a bit wilted, but would perk right up with a large infusion of cash. Jeff Bezos would have a much shorter commute from his home in Kalorama.


6. Time to operations. Baltimore seems to be pretty good at cutting fast track sweetheart deals for the favored few. Breaking ground may be another story …

7. Cultural community fit – Could go any way. Baltimore is diverse (in spots) and has an exciting vibe. It has several colleges and universities and John Hopkins is considered top tier. I'm guessing that Amazon Management would find Maryland politicians much more congenial political playfellows than NC or Texas.

8. Community/quality of life. - Do people want to live in Baltimore? Charming and quirky city, super close to the U.S. Capital but with a significantly cheaper cost of living. Crime? Uuummm……

Most people don’t think that Amazon would have so widely publicized these requirements if they didn’t want to create a buzz and generate some creative offers. Relocating to Baltimore would be a somewhat unconventional choice and certainly create the buzz they are after. If Baltimore pulled this off, it would be a radical game changer for Baltimore in every way.

So how about it Baltimoreans? Want to be Silicon Harbor?
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:11 PM
 
1,310 posts, read 1,144,254 times
Reputation: 794
I think the positives of the Port Covington site are impressive:

- Strong labor force. The city's labor force is a little better than it reputed to be and PC is easily accessible to Howard, Ann Arundel, most of Baltimore County and Prince George's, and some of Montgomery, Carroll, and Harford Counties. Being on the south side of the city right on an interstate is a big advantage. While the city's labor force is mediocre, those other counties a one hour commute area of approaching 2 1/4 million (not including the city) - have lots of people of with excellent skills.
- Port Covington is a fantastic site. Plank also controls the Westport waterfront.
- While Baltimore is not super cheap, it is cheap for an east coast city.
- Great logistics - and don't forget about relatively nearby Sparrows Point

Neutral factors - Culture and quality of life... it depends on what you like

Negatives:

- Public transit improvements will need to be included in the incentive package
- Crime!!!! while Port Covington is destined to be extremely safe, potential Amazon employees and visitors will be deeply concerned about the city's astronomical crime rate. An Afrocentric white friend of mine is already upset that Under Armour employees will be able to work in PC in safety. She thinks that everybody should be potential prey for the criminal element. How are criminals supposed to earn a living if some people spending time in Baltimore City are relatively invulnerable? How unfair is that?
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Old 09-12-2017, 07:12 AM
 
5,289 posts, read 5,943,428 times
Reputation: 1132
*These negroes and hillbillies are not trying to work a steady job. Read the Amazon employment reviews, it's sad! Lol. They just want to sniff dope and drink 40s all day long and talk about the Ravens.






Quote:
Originally Posted by pwduvall View Post
I think the positives of the Port Covington site are impressive:

- Strong labor force. The city's labor force is a little better than it reputed to be and PC is easily accessible to Howard, Ann Arundel, most of Baltimore County and Prince George's, and some of Montgomery, Carroll, and Harford Counties. Being on the south side of the city right on an interstate is a big advantage. While the city's labor force is mediocre, those other counties a one hour commute area of approaching 2 1/4 million (not including the city) - have lots of people of with excellent skills.
- Port Covington is a fantastic site. Plank also controls the Westport waterfront.
- While Baltimore is not super cheap, it is cheap for an east coast city.
- Great logistics - and don't forget about relatively nearby Sparrows Point

Neutral factors - Culture and quality of life... it depends on what you like

Negatives:

- Public transit improvements will need to be included in the incentive package
- Crime!!!! while Port Covington is destined to be extremely safe, potential Amazon employees and visitors will be deeply concerned about the city's astronomical crime rate. An Afrocentric white friend of mine is already upset that Under Armour employees will be able to work in PC in safety. She thinks that everybody should be potential prey for the criminal element. How are criminals supposed to earn a living if some people spending time in Baltimore City are relatively invulnerable? How unfair is that?
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Old 09-12-2017, 07:13 AM
 
5,289 posts, read 5,943,428 times
Reputation: 1132
This was very well written.



Quote:
Originally Posted by ersatz View Post
I’m very surprised not to find an Amazon HQ2 thread in the Baltimore forum, given how so many business articles point to Baltimore as a strong contender. Yes, I know there’s a CD thread in the MD Washington forum, but that seems primarily centered on Bethesa/College Park/DC/NoVA. http://www.city-data.com/forum/washi...q2-search.html Amazon’s new HQ is a hot topic on C-D and in the business journals. Chicago, Boston, Philly, Atlanta, and Austin are all considered strong contenders. But, there are dark horses such as Charlotte, Minneapolis/St Paul, and Nashville. And Baltimore.
1. Site/building. Amazon is looking for existing buildings of at least 500,000 square feet and total site space of up to 8 million sq ft. It would like the site to be within 30 miles of a population center and within 45 minutes of an international airport. It prefers metro areas with more than 1 million people. Its Seattle headquarters includes 33 buildings totaling 8.1 million sq ft.

2. Capital and operating costs. Amazon is prioritizing “stable and business-friendly regulations and tax structure” in its considerations. The company is seeking out incentives from state and local governments “to offset initial capital outlay and ongoing operational costs.” At its Seattle headquarters, Amazon says it invested $3.7 billion in buildings and infrastructure from 2010 to 2017, and spent another $1.4 billion on utilities and maintenance.

3. Incentives. The company is asking applicants to outline the specific types of incentives they could offer, such as tax credits and relocation grants, as well calculations on the amount of total incentives that could be provided. “The initial and ongoing cost of doing business are critical decision drivers,” the RFP states.

4. Labor force. Hiring 50,000 skilled workers is no easy task, and Amazon wants to make sure its new headquarters is in an area with a readily available pool of talent. The company is prioritizing sites with a “strong university system.” It’s asked cities to provide a list of universities and community colleges with “relevant degrees” plus the number of students to graduate with those degrees over the past three years. Amazon also wants information on computer-science programs in the local and regional K-12 education system.

5. Logistics. Amazon is first and foremost a master of logistics, so it should come as no surprise that the company cares a lot about transportation. Amazon wants on-site access to mass transit—train, subway, or bus—and to be no more than one or two miles from major highways and connecting roads. It wants to be within 45 minutes of an international airport with daily direct flights to Seattle, New York, the San Francisco Bay area, and Washington DC. The company is also asking applicants to identify “all transit options, including bike lanes and pedestrian access” for the proposed site and to rank traffic congestion during peak commuting hours.
6. Time to operations. To begin construction as soon as possible, Amazon wants an outline of the permitting process and approximate timetable ahead of “Phase 1” of the building process—the first 500,000 to 1 million sq ft, for an investment of $300 million to $600 million.

7. Cultural community fit. Like any tech company, Amazon cares about “culture fit.” It defines this as a diverse population, strong higher-education system, and local government that is “eager and willing to work with the company.” Amazon is asking cities to “demonstrate characteristics of this” in their responses. “We encourage testimonials from other large companies,” it adds.

8. Community/quality of life. The new headquarters should be in a place where people want to live. Amazon is interested in daily living and recreational opportunities for people in each proposed metro area. It is also requesting information about housing prices and availability, general cost of living, and crime statistics.

Baltimore fits the bill on most of these.


1. Site/building. Baltimore City is pitching the Port Covington parcel with its 130 acres (a bit of demolition is required ☹)

2. Capital and operating costs. Since Baltimore is so eager to play footsie with developers, they’d likely let Amazon get to third base.

3. Incentives. Above.

4. Labor force. Amazon is not going to pay a six figure salary to every gangbanger hanging out at Mondawin Mall, but there is a massive supply of WashBalt Beltway Bandit staff who would (and do) commute for a good offer on a company with prestigious reputation. There would be tremendous spin off opportunities for local business and the local labor market.

5. Logistics. BWI! Rail! Port of Baltimore! The city public transport quality is in place, a bit wilted, but would perk right up with a large infusion of cash. Jeff Bezos would have a much shorter commute from his home in Kalorama.


6. Time to operations. Baltimore seems to be pretty good at cutting fast track sweetheart deals for the favored few. Breaking ground may be another story …

7. Cultural community fit – Could go any way. Baltimore is diverse (in spots) and has an exciting vibe. It has several colleges and universities and John Hopkins is considered top tier. I'm guessing that Amazon Management would find Maryland politicians much more congenial political playfellows than NC or Texas.

8. Community/quality of life. - Do people want to live in Baltimore? Charming and quirky city, super close to the U.S. Capital but with a significantly cheaper cost of living. Crime? Uuummm……

Most people don’t think that Amazon would have so widely publicized these requirements if they didn’t want to create a buzz and generate some creative offers. Relocating to Baltimore would be a somewhat unconventional choice and certainly create the buzz they are after. If Baltimore pulled this off, it would be a radical game changer for Baltimore in every way.

So how about it Baltimoreans? Want to be Silicon Harbor?
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Old 09-12-2017, 07:26 AM
 
707 posts, read 638,328 times
Reputation: 833
I have read a handful of articles on Amazon's distribution centers
(some written by or from an interview of former employees) and
they state that Amazon will hire anyone that passes a drug test.
The work pace is similiar to Depression era dance marathons.
You have to keep moving. Workdays can be 10 hours sometimes
and besides a lunch break, you get 2 10 minute breaks. You are
rated on your speed and should that decrease, points are taken
away. If your points decrease to a certain threshold, you are fired.
It could only be because of a bathroom break that you are let go.
They pay a little better than normal, but turnover is high.
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Old 09-12-2017, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
7,233 posts, read 4,692,511 times
Reputation: 6593
Funny that they want to be close to an airport. Wouldn't that preclude using drones?
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Old 09-12-2017, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Howard County, Maryland
7,154 posts, read 4,385,409 times
Reputation: 19425
If they want to be near the city but not in it, Columbia Gateway meets a lot of their criteria. Though, I don't know how much of it is vacant. Also, the mass transit that's available there now is pretty thin, though it could be beefed up.
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Old 09-12-2017, 03:37 PM
 
6,616 posts, read 10,080,040 times
Reputation: 1908
I don't know what kind of corporate philosophy Amazon has..BUT it may seem like they would want to be in an "up and coming" city where their presence could aid and thus be attributed to the city moving from one tier into the next. Additionally, they may want to be in a place where their corporate giving could go a long way locally. IF these two factors rank high.. in addition to all the incentives and economic development specs.. Baltimore could be a good fit especially for your techy types that may want an urban lifestyle at a fraction of the cost. I mean they could go to Charlotte, Minneapolis or Indy and be in one of the "new cities" but Baltimore would give them something different and is probably like what Seattle was 60 years ago.. an sleepy post industrial port city (minus the widespread poverty and crime) So that said..Philly and Detroit would also fit that bill as well....though Philly has shown extreme the most extreme promise. Detroit vs everybody is a catchy phrase though...
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Old 09-13-2017, 06:32 AM
 
5,289 posts, read 5,943,428 times
Reputation: 1132
Go Philly! I hope they get it!
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:42 AM
 
6,616 posts, read 10,080,040 times
Reputation: 1908
Default And the winner is.....

I had to redo my post.. we this was just for logistics.. so.. we may still have a shot.


https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/...b-locates.html

Last edited by Woodlands; 09-13-2017 at 09:11 AM..
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