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Old 12-22-2010, 02:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
22nd out of how many?
I don't think it matters, I think the surprising part is that Baltimore is less segregated than 21 other cities (at least I think that's what that number meant). Although I guess it depends on their definition of "large."
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Old 12-22-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Portland, Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
22nd out of how many? It seems that Baltimore, and many other older industrial cities were built segregated given the city's history.. Blockbusting, racial covenants, exclusionary zoning, redlining et al. I would bet that many new residents moving to the City probably base their decision where to move on value, safety, character, location, amenities etc more so than purely race. Since the city's population growth hasnt been explosive the old segregation lines still hold for the most part. As the City's population increases I think those areas that are appealing to residents, of any race, will see a decrease in the number of segregated neighborhoods.. though I dont think it will be enough to decrease the numbers citywide since some areas may not be that appealing to discriminating buyer of any race ( discriminating meaning the buyer that has the income to choose among a variety of perferred options... not racial descrimination per se)


I went to the Brookings Institute web site and found it under the author's name. Below is the link but it is referring to metro areas that are quite large. Milwaukee, Detroit, and NYC were listed as 1,2,3 respectively.


New Racial Segregation Measures for States and Large Metropolitan Areas: Analysis of the 2005-2009 American Community Survey
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Old 12-22-2010, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Cheswolde
1,958 posts, read 4,248,024 times
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Default Ambitious exhibit being planned

Twenty-eight students of MICA, the Maryland Institute College of Art, are working on an exhibit that deals with these matters. Here is a link to get those interested started
BALTIMORE: OPEN CITY
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Old 12-27-2010, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Eastern Balto County
99 posts, read 207,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barante View Post
Finding myself unexpectedly in Towson the other day, I went to check out Ukazoo, a huge store of used (and some new) books across from the mall. Staring my face there was a copy of a book I have been meaning to read for a long time -- Black Social Capital: The Politics of School Reform in Baltimore 1986-1998 by Marion Orr.
This slim volume is quite impressive, a serious work that focuses on important matters like Mayor Schmoke's ill-fated privatization drive, the Educational Alternatives Inc. experiment. Orr (it's a he) also sketches a nice nutshell characterization of Baltimore and its history.
Orr's book is ten years old. This topic continues to preoccupy academics. Soon to appear, Brown in Baltimore: School Desegregation and the Limits of Liberalism, by Howell Baum.
Having read the proofs of Antero Pietila's forthcoming Not in My Neighborhood: How Bigotry Shaped a Great American City, I was rather struck by the paucity of his discussion of school matters. The reason appears to be the absence of available, reliable attendance data.
In 1948, Baltimore was unique. It was the first and only big-city school system, according to the New York Times, to desegregate that fall (Poly had desegregated earlier). Because of a high degree of residential segregation, the changes were negligible. In most places. Here's Pietila's description of the most striking exception. (The school in question was not at its present location but at Pulaski and Gwynns Falls, approximately where the running track of Douglass Hi -- the former Western Hi for girls -- is today):
"At Gwynns Falls Parkway Elementary School, the student population went from all white to 44.5 percent black. A stampede ensued. A sixth of the school’s white pupils withdrew during that academic year, resulting in a student body that was 77.4 percent black the very next year. Across the street from the school was the construction site for Mondawmin, the city’s first shopping mall. When it opened in 1956, its coffee shop, the White Coffee Pot, did not serve blacks. By that time, Gwynns Falls Parkway Elementary School had become 92.8 percent black, with the black enrollment to rise to 96.1 percent in 1957. Such a transformation in just three years scared away white shoppers, who never materialized at Mondawmin in projected numbers. Many out-of-town retailers quickly terminated their leases."
This all happened even before the 1968 riots which scared many white shoppers from returning to commercial areas like Monument St. However the educational system has taken on new concepts. Years ago it was just public and parochial. Now there is choices: home schooling, charter schools and most Protestant churches and synagagues have their own schools.
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Old 12-28-2010, 07:38 AM
 
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I went to Target at Mondawmin over the Holidays... Not only was the store busy but at least 30% to 40% of the shoppers were white. I think there was a belief that white shoppers would not patronize this Target. I think the abundance of security.. both target and BPD.. has encourage many white in addition to middle income black shoppers to shop at the store. The store is also clean and well stocked. It just recently added an expanded grocery section as well. Its amazing how retail goes in cycles. Walmart and Lowes coming to Remington is another example.
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Old 12-30-2010, 07:52 PM
 
Location: Eastern Balto County
99 posts, read 207,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodlands View Post
I went to Target at Mondawmin over the Holidays... Not only was the store busy but at least 30% to 40% of the shoppers were white. I think there was a belief that white shoppers would not patronize this Target. I think the abundance of security.. both target and BPD.. has encourage many white in addition to middle income black shoppers to shop at the store. The store is also clean and well stocked. It just recently added an expanded grocery section as well. Its amazing how retail goes in cycles. Walmart and Lowes coming to Remington is another example.
I have not been over to the West side in a while, but I think the Belair rd Northeast corrider needs a revitalization. There are too many vacant car dealerships and many business establishments folded up. If anyone would drive thru Gardenville, please take note of the many old beautiful farm houses there. I think there is some attempt to bring Hamilton back, once was sprawling with The Arcade, restaurants, retail stores and bars. Just like anywhere ample parking and the public sense of security needs to be implemented.
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Old 12-30-2010, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Cheswolde
1,958 posts, read 4,248,024 times
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Default Mark your calendars

The Reggie Lewis African American Museum downtown will have a talk at 2 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 8 on "Integration Debate: Competing Futures for American Cities." The two panelists are Chet Hartman of the Poverty and Race Research Center and Gregory D. Squires, an economics professor. Both very good.
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Old 01-04-2011, 02:08 PM
 
3,402 posts, read 4,391,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikey jam View Post
I have not been over to the West side in a while, but I think the Belair rd Northeast corrider needs a revitalization. There are too many vacant car dealerships and many business establishments folded up. If anyone would drive thru Gardenville, please take note of the many old beautiful farm houses there. I think there is some attempt to bring Hamilton back, once was sprawling with The Arcade, restaurants, retail stores and bars. Just like anywhere ample parking and the public sense of security needs to be implemented.

I think NE Baltimore may undergo some transition.... Maybe not as much Hamilton, Lauraville, Beverly Hills or Waltherson.. But mainly for Gardenville, Franford, Overlea and Bel Air Edison. As East Baltimore is emptied out around Hopkins.. I believe that most of these residents will seek out housing in NE.. Some of the residents will be good neighbors.. some may be bad. The connectivity of NE Baltimore to East Baltimore will provide some comfort and familiarity making it a viable move for some. Large homes in Overlea can be converted to rooming houses or duplexes and investors may find deals to turn into additional single family rental units. What happen in NW Baltimore with the expansion of West Baltimore into Park Heights, Howard Park, and Windsor Mill could gradually begin to happen in the NE. In West Baltimore it was the highway to nowhere that started the trend......in East Baltimore it will be Hopkins.......
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Old 01-17-2011, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Cheswolde
1,958 posts, read 4,248,024 times
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Default Trends

Survey finds growing Jewish community, less engaged youth - baltimoresun.com
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Old 01-17-2011, 10:40 PM
 
76 posts, read 132,863 times
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Aren't most younger people in general less religious? Church attendance has been declining for years. The US is still much more religious than Europe - hell, over there, most people don't even believe in God.
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