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Old 10-22-2009, 08:27 PM
 
Location: West Boylston, Ma
172 posts, read 212,214 times
Reputation: 117
Yeah..but that was warranted...I come from proud fighting Irish stock from Chicago....
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Old 10-23-2009, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,740 posts, read 5,013,682 times
Reputation: 2665
I said that in my post first! After all I grew up in Boston!
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Old 10-26-2009, 06:33 AM
 
Location: West Boylston, Ma
172 posts, read 212,214 times
Reputation: 117
Like minds, as they say!
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Old 10-26-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1 posts, read 1,543 times
Reputation: 18
I lived in Orono, attended the university of maine, live in Boston now. Don't expect any overt racism here, most people are friendly but do expect to receive a great deal of stares, and lots of questions. When I was living there, I had many mainers ask me questions like "why on earth would you attend college in a place like this?" and "Do you enjoy living in a cold, barren, isolated, frozen, inhospitable tundra?. I was surprised to see as much as black people in Bangor as I did, I think the census numbers are slightly inaccurate. As far as racism. I did not experience any at all, this includes restaurants, the mall, and other public places. Most people there seem to go out of their way to help you. I remember one day, I was in Hampden, I had a flat tire, and at least 6 other drivers pulled over and asked if I needed any help.
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Old 01-04-2010, 06:45 PM
 
3 posts, read 3,623 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Not to get too off topic here, but does anyone find African-American a little offensive? To me it's a little like saying you're not quite an American. No other country hyphenates African-xxxxxx, and we don't hyphenate with any other ethnicity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tcrackly View Post
Sure we do! Growing up in Boston I've heard people say proudly Italian-American, Irish-American, Indian-American, et al. It emphasizes your recognition of your traditional roots, culture, language while still being a proud American, sure of your stake in this great country where there is room for everyone to be themselves.
"African-American" also diffuses all the 300 years of denigration and minimizing of African cultures. When you have generations of mandated self hatred you have to rebuild your self worth from the ground up.
Maine is a great place to strengthen one's personal identity because it is so less diversified and most of the people have a genuine acceptance of difference..even embracing it. I get heartened every time I ssee all the happy kids participating in Portland's many African music or dance projects. It destroys stereotypes and inspires creativity in the newer generation while they are still a clean slate. And it offers new options for listening pleasure on the lobster boat!

I believe that part of the original comment was "no other country" hypenhates African-xxxxxx and that is correct. In the UK, France, Holland, etc.. they will refer to the country the black person is from.

I personally find it offensive as well.

Referring to people as Irish-American, Polish-American, Italian-American and other ethnicities is not the same as referring to someone as African-American. Calling someone a European-American would be similar to calling someone African-American or Asian-American, and I am quite positive that there would be many people belonging to one specific European subgroup who would get offended at being considered to be of the same ethnicity as someone else from another specific subgroup. There are about 50 countries in Europe and most of their problems with each other have always been over race or ethnicity issues, with over a 100,000 people dying as recently as 15 years ago with Yugoslavia breaking up. I am fairly sure a Bosnian would mind being labeled European-American that would also include Serbs. and vice-versa, when they lost so much in their fight for recognition.


Africa is the second largest continent in the world After Asia and houses over 50 countries with almost 50% more population than Europe which is about 1 billion vs 700 million. Asia is the biggest continent in the world with slightly under 50 countries but has almost 4 billion population which is about 60% of the world population.

Yet the US is a white man's nation and labels anyone from Asia an Asian-American (except Indians of course but then again Pakistanis are also considered Indian in the US, even though they are at the brink of nuclear war with each other) and everyone from Africa is African-American of course. While it can't tell the difference between 4 billion people in Asia and a billion in Africa, it sure can label Irish-American's, with Ireland having only a population of slightly over 4 million.

I am white btw. My family and I lived in Africa for 6 years, and the cultural differences you will encounter between different African countries and the differences you will see in the physical appearances of their citizens will be no less than the differences that someone will see between the US and Mexico. But then again, everybody not white looks the same to the general white person that they can just categorize all non-white people as African-Americans or Asian-Americans.
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Old 01-04-2010, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Coastal Bend, Texas
113 posts, read 191,284 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltire001 View Post
I believe that part of the original comment was "no other country" hypenhates African-xxxxxx and that is correct. In the UK, France, Holland, etc.. they will refer to the country the black person is from.

I personally find it offensive as well.

Referring to people as Irish-American, Polish-American, Italian-American and other ethnicities is not the same as referring to someone as African-American. Calling someone a European-American would be similar to calling someone African-American or Asian-American, and I am quite positive that there would be many people belonging to one specific European subgroup who would get offended at being considered to be of the same ethnicity as someone else from another specific subgroup. There are about 50 countries in Europe and most of their problems with each other have always been over race or ethnicity issues, with over a 100,000 people dying as recently as 15 years ago with Yugoslavia breaking up. I am fairly sure a Bosnian would mind being labeled European-American that would also include Serbs. and vice-versa, when they lost so much in their fight for recognition.


Africa is the second largest continent in the world After Asia and houses over 50 countries with almost 50% more population than Europe which is about 1 billion vs 700 million. Asia is the biggest continent in the world with slightly under 50 countries but has almost 4 billion population which is about 60% of the world population.

Yet the US is a white man's nation and labels anyone from Asia an Asian-American (except Indians of course but then again Pakistanis are also considered Indian in the US, even though they are at the brink of nuclear war with each other) and everyone from Africa is African-American of course. While it can't tell the difference between 4 billion people in Asia and a billion in Africa, it sure can label Irish-American's, with Ireland having only a population of slightly over 4 million.

I am white btw. My family and I lived in Africa for 6 years, and the cultural differences you will encounter between different African countries and the differences you will see in the physical appearances of their citizens will be no less than the differences that someone will see between the US and Mexico. But then again, everybody not white looks the same to the general white person that they can just categorize all non-white people as African-Americans or Asian-Americans.
There's always someone who is gonna complain.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:32 AM
 
3 posts, read 3,623 times
Reputation: 15
That's why we shouldn't use any of those terms. Too late for my generation or even for anyone over 10 or so years old since what we know is already imprinted deep in our minds. We live in the US, we are Americans, we aren't Irish or Scottish or "African". If you are interested in your heritage, great for you.. It is good to know it and not forget where your family is from or what they did to get here, but you yourself are an American, period. There are no countries in the world where every citizen is of the same ancestry, you decide to live in one country and abide by its laws/rules, you are a citizen of that county. Your ancestors came to this country as non-Americans (including anyone from any American Indian tribe) but you were born here and raised here, and are 100% American.

If you are white and are trying to point out another white guy in a crowd, you don't refer to him as the "white guy" and if you are black, you don't describe other black people as "the black guy". People need to use traits other than the color of the skin to describe a person and even though it may be possible in a generation or two to minimize racism, I don't see it happening in our lifetime. People can pretend as much as they want that they are not racist but when they start using the words white/black/yellow, it automatically goes to show that they do not consider people the same since at a subconscious (or even conscious) level they do categorize them based on color and race.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,740 posts, read 5,013,682 times
Reputation: 2665
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltire001 View Post
I believe that part of the original comment was "no other country" hypenhates African-xxxxxx and that is correct. In the UK, France, Holland, etc.. they will refer to the country the black person is from.

I personally find it offensive as well.

Referring to people as Irish-American, Polish-American, Italian-American and other ethnicities is not the same as referring to someone as African-American. Calling someone a European-American would be similar to calling someone African-American or Asian-American, and I am quite positive that there would be many people belonging to one specific European subgroup who would get offended at being considered to be of the same ethnicity as someone else from another specific subgroup. There are about 50 countries in Europe and most of their problems with each other have always been over race or ethnicity issues, with over a 100,000 people dying as recently as 15 years ago with Yugoslavia breaking up. I am fairly sure a Bosnian would mind being labeled European-American that would also include Serbs. and vice-versa, when they lost so much in their fight for recognition.


Africa is the second largest continent in the world After Asia and houses over 50 countries with almost 50% more population than Europe which is about 1 billion vs 700 million. Asia is the biggest continent in the world with slightly under 50 countries but has almost 4 billion population which is about 60% of the world population.

Yet the US is a white man's nation and labels anyone from Asia an Asian-American (except Indians of course but then again Pakistanis are also considered Indian in the US, even though they are at the brink of nuclear war with each other) and everyone from Africa is African-American of course. While it can't tell the difference between 4 billion people in Asia and a billion in Africa, it sure can label Irish-American's, with Ireland having only a population of slightly over 4 million.

I am white btw. My family and I lived in Africa for 6 years, and the cultural differences you will encounter between different African countries and the differences you will see in the physical appearances of their citizens will be no less than the differences that someone will see between the US and Mexico. But then again, everybody not white looks the same to the general white person that they can just categorize all non-white people as African-Americans or Asian-Americans.
Unfortunately our history does not necessarily mirror the experience of Blacks in Europe. i would like nothing better to say Nigerian-American or Ghanaian-American although it's still over simplified. We were robbed of our ability to pledge allegiance to one of the many cultures of Africa when our ancestors were forced to accept the homogeneity of oppression. Sad fact of life. Using the term "African-American" is our only, perhaps feeble attempt, to regain pride in the ancient lands and cultures that originally spawned us. As I've said before, myself, like many African-Americans are actually a new tribe, mixed by choice and by force with European and Native -American bloods. If someone came up with a more generally accepted term describing just that, I would prefer it.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Coastal Bend, Texas
113 posts, read 191,284 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by saltire001 View Post
That's why we shouldn't use any of those terms. Too late for my generation or even for anyone over 10 or so years old since what we know is already imprinted deep in our minds. We live in the US, we are Americans, we aren't Irish or Scottish or "African". If you are interested in your heritage, great for you.. It is good to know it and not forget where your family is from or what they did to get here, but you yourself are an American, period. There are no countries in the world where every citizen is of the same ancestry, you decide to live in one country and abide by its laws/rules, you are a citizen of that county. Your ancestors came to this country as non-Americans (including anyone from any American Indian tribe) but you were born here and raised here, and are 100% American.

If you are white and are trying to point out another white guy in a crowd, you don't refer to him as the "white guy" and if you are black, you don't describe other black people as "the black guy". People need to use traits other than the color of the skin to describe a person and even though it may be possible in a generation or two to minimize racism, I don't see it happening in our lifetime. People can pretend as much as they want that they are not racist but when they start using the words white/black/yellow, it automatically goes to show that they do not consider people the same since at a subconscious (or even conscious) level they do categorize them based on color and race.
Well,I remember in the seventies,the "Politically correct"word was negro.Then in the eighties,it was changed to "Black".Then,in the middle nineties,it was again changed to African American.What's next?
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Old 01-05-2010, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Way South of the Volvo Line
2,740 posts, read 5,013,682 times
Reputation: 2665
It has always been a progression based on what kind of respect could be afforded to Blacks expected from Americans at large. " Negro" was a pseudo-scientific term originating from the common misconception that there a three main groups of human beings, once considered an improvement on "colored" , which was non-descriptive and generally used condescendingly ( think circa 1954) . "Black" came about as a strong term demanding attention and accentuating the polarizing condition of our racial groups in the 60's and 70's. Then "Afro-American", a little more on track with actual heritage, but still kind of trendy, like the hairstyle.
One has to remember that most of us Americans of African descent never had a "mother tongue" to refer to nostalgically. We have never known the actual country or village of our great-great grandparents like so many of our Irish or Italian descended fellow Americans. This is not by choice but a calculated effort on the part of the ruling(owning) classes that sought to enslave our ancestors. It creates a personal void as well as a historical one. No specific traditional folk tunes to hum, no village colors to as souvenirs. This is what most Americans fail to understand.
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