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Old 08-20-2010, 06:27 AM
 
Location: NE PA
7,938 posts, read 13,246,459 times
Reputation: 4356

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I need to sit down one of these nights and go through my old baseball cards...its been years since I looked through them....most of mine are 1981-91, with some random 1970s cards...a 77 Mike Schmidt and an Ozzie Smith rookie card stick out in my mind......that was the best trade I ever made, I traded a 1984 Darryl Strawberry Fleer rookie for the 1979 Ozzie Smith Topps rookie.
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Old 08-21-2010, 12:51 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
251 posts, read 944,400 times
Reputation: 114
In my opinion, the biggest thing that caused the crash of the BBC market was the placement of overpriced 'chase cards' in packs. The rest of the cards averaged $0.25 or less and the chase card was worth $25.00 or more. The chase cards were (and still are) a little thicker and a little wider than the rest of the cards in the pack. All someone has to do is run their fingers along the edges of the packs and you can tell if a chase card is in there. Over time a box on the shelf would have nothing but regular cards inside and no one wanted to pay $2.00 a pack for cards. Which brings me to my second point.

The inflation of pack prices. Going from $0.69 for a pack of 15 cards (plus gum!) to $2.00+ for six or seven cards was just ridiculous. Sure, the quality of cards were better, but come on. It caused the hobby to go from buying packs to make a set to buying packs solely to make money. And kids, nor their parents, could afford to pay $2 a pack.
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Old 08-21-2010, 03:31 PM
 
4 posts, read 2,495 times
Reputation: 10
Oldhousegirl:

Here are a couple of sites that may help (assuming you wanted an online source instead of a printed one like Beckett, TuffStuff etc).
Checkoutmycards.com is a site that people join, send in their cards and actually the site owners scan and post the cards for sale. Even if that is not the route you wish to go, that is a good site to get a general idea of the value.
There you will also see what other responders have pointed out, the fact that Ebay, and the internet in general , has driven down values. Used to be if you lived in a small town 60 miles east of Butte Montana your resources were extremely limited as far as selling, trading or acquiring cards. It was a sellers market to end all. I remember my only access to cards I wanted other that high-priced mail order in the 80's were quarterly card shows 50 miles from my house . I took a business trip to Raleigh in 1990 and my first trip was to a card shop that had cards I had no access to around my home in Upstate NY. Now one has access to just about any card, any condition , from multiple sources without leaving their bedroom. Its a collectors market for sure not a seller or speculator (unless you got a lot of $$$$ and a lot of time).
Baseball Card Value Price Guide, Basketball Cards, Football Cards, Hockey Cards, Boxing Cards, Non-Sports Cards, Auction Prices and Antiques, Art and Collectibles - What's it Worth? | WorthPoint are a couple other sites that can get you relative values, with a catch, you have to join for a fee. Checkoutmycards has a pricetag attached to it at well. The sites make sense to me, but I still use the ebay closed auction search to get a value. Then again, if you are brave, do what may ebayer say to do, and I have done , to my surprise, somewhat successfully (though in 2003 not recently). The theory is, make your auction easily searchable, and start it at .01-.99 cents. The tried and true practice is, that the item with any value will find its correct price in the auction (kind of water seeking its own level). Do not put a reserve , that only scares off serious bidder. I have had surprising success with that method .
I also agree with most that the $$ are in pre-1981 , the newer cards , even the "tiffany" sets are not a good investment. I collect them but only because I enjoy collecting. Its the only thing I have in life that connects me to my childhood of less chaotic and more pleasant times. I have detested the graded card scam, as to me that just highlightss everything bad in the hobby.
Hope this info helps.
Lenn Totten
lenn@twcny.rr.com
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Old 08-22-2010, 11:47 PM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 12,875,385 times
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I have over 200 Jose Canseco cards, he used to be my favorite baseball player, its just sucks to see what he has become, I would still root for him though if he ever came back to the MLB.

I also use to autograph average player baseball cards and trade them to friends for good cards, I was such a cheat.

I even have a Jose Canseco autographed baseball and a Ken Griffey Jr. autographed baseball that I stole.
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Old 08-23-2010, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Long Island,New York
8,163 posts, read 12,485,308 times
Reputation: 2458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chimpie View Post
In my opinion, the biggest thing that caused the crash of the BBC market was the placement of overpriced 'chase cards' in packs. The rest of the cards averaged $0.25 or less and the chase card was worth $25.00 or more. The chase cards were (and still are) a little thicker and a little wider than the rest of the cards in the pack. All someone has to do is run their fingers along the edges of the packs and you can tell if a chase card is in there. Over time a box on the shelf would have nothing but regular cards inside and no one wanted to pay $2.00 a pack for cards. Which brings me to my second point.

The inflation of pack prices. Going from $0.69 for a pack of 15 cards (plus gum!) to $2.00+ for six or seven cards was just ridiculous. Sure, the quality of cards were better, but come on. It caused the hobby to go from buying packs to make a set to buying packs solely to make money. And kids, nor their parents, could afford to pay $2 a pack.
Here's what specifically killed the market. In 1987 you had topps, donruss and fleer. By 1989 you had topps, donruss, fleer, score, sportflics, upper deck, and bowman. In the 90's these companies were making multiple sets. What do you think would have happened if Nolan Ryan had a rookie card in 10 different company sets? That's what killed the market... too many companies and sets. AKA mass production.
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Old 08-23-2010, 05:37 PM
 
2,500 posts, read 2,404,648 times
Reputation: 902
Quote:
Originally Posted by desert sun View Post
I have over 200 Jose Canseco cards, he used to be my favorite baseball player, its just sucks to see what he has become, I would still root for him though if he ever came back to the MLB.

I also use to autograph average player baseball cards and trade them to friends for good cards, I was such a cheat.

I even have a Jose Canseco autographed baseball and a Ken Griffey Jr. autographed baseball that I stole.
And this, my friends, is what the hobby is all about.
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Old 09-06-2010, 09:21 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,495 times
Reputation: 10
Bring the Content....Bingo...that why the best way to "do" this hobby is take the investment part out of it...decide what and how you collect then go after it....what this guy said about autographs is how I go about it...my autographs are trips back down memory lane...I have sold a few on ebay,....but sad to say...when I post all I think about it defending the authenticity...its not worth it for a $10 autograph...Its better off staying with me...

I stayed home for 2 yrs between high school and college (1973-75). I spent that entire year sending out autograph requests to sports figures (primarily baseball). I know some I got back were forgeries (Pete Rose, Reggie Jackson). I heard stories of secretaries and clubhouse personel doing the signing, but for the most part it was on the up and up. Some were outstanding, particularly the hockey players.
Bobby Hull sent me 8x10's personally autographed, Jean Beliveau and Guy LaFleur sent me personalized notes. The one from Guy LaFleur went "Ambicalement mon ami etc" . The best one I got was a note from Skip Jutze a backup catcher for Houston with a return address from his Puerto Rican Wnter League team apologizing fro being late responding. I got 20 souvenier disks autographed by Casey Stengel. To me ,, these things the value is irrelevant. I am keeping them. But the hoppy is so ruined I could see someone badgering me about authenticity if I sold them.
I had , I would guess a 70 percent hit rate on responses..I bet today it would be 10 percent. Back then it was only .20 per request. Now it would be a dollar.
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Old 09-06-2010, 09:26 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,495 times
Reputation: 10
That is what should have killed the hobby. It lingered on for years and each year it got worse, more inserts. parallel sets (you needed a PHD to understand the checklists). But this year I see the pulse has slowed a bit. The shelves at WalMart seemed less "varied". I love the Heritage sets and the Chromes but First Editions and SP's see ridiculous.
The deathknell this time I believe is the liscencing agreements. I think some mfg would continue on, but cannot legally. I find it hard to believe companies like Panini can stay in business.
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Old 09-06-2010, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
623 posts, read 1,282,348 times
Reputation: 345
I loved collecting cards as a kid. It stopped being fun once it became all about the card's value to me. Before that a Mark Lemke or Charlie Leibrandt would get me as excited as nearly any other card out there.

These collectibles often go full circle. Eventually collecting cards will come back and folks will be back to paying way to much for a piece of cardboard with some Southern League player who may or may not be working for FedEx in 5 years.
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Old 09-21-2010, 11:42 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,495 times
Reputation: 10
Default My feeling exactly

Sir,
I most likely predate you, but thats how I feel. My biggest memories of 1960's collecting was getting #304 Sandy Valdespino to complete Topps 4th series, and gazing longingly into 7th series checklists and dreaming what it would be like to be able to get a Joe Nossek, Roberto Pena, of Lou Klimchock. Those days are long gone for several reasons but boy they were fun.
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