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Old 03-20-2012, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
17,032 posts, read 26,879,146 times
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Many pro players are talented enough that they could play another sport. Joe Mauer turned down a ride in football from Florida State in their heyday. Most choose baseball because of the longevity and guaranteed $$$.
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Old 03-20-2012, 08:41 PM
 
371 posts, read 649,526 times
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What else are most of these guys going to do? It's not like they would have high paying jobs in finance or law waiting for them.

And, even if they did, those desk jobs suck compared to playing a game for a living, where you get to travel the country, hang out with friends all day and get a 4 month vacation each year.

The bottom line is that for 80% of MLB players, playing baseball would be their only option at making $100,000 a year, so they would play. Another 10% might have good college degrees (not in Physical Education, or some other flimsy major) or connections that might get them decent desk jobs, but most would probably rather be playing baseball.

The last 10% might have a shot at another pro sport, and might take that option, but in the end I think it's a small portion of all current MLB players.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Vermont / NEK
5,773 posts, read 12,321,576 times
Reputation: 7193
Babe Ruth would have played for that amount, but that's a little rough around the edges as fair statements go...
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:33 PM
 
20,976 posts, read 16,268,006 times
Reputation: 10270
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
This calls for a hypothetical prediction. How many current MLB players would continue to play, if the maximum salary were wet at $100,000 a year?

Before you jump to a quick conclusion, consider these facts:

1. There are twice as many players playing in 6 independent leagues, most of whom were originally drafted by MLB teams. They make about $1,000 month, and continue to play.

2. Players under MLB contract in the lower minors (Class A and Rookie leagues) have almost no prospect of reaching the majors, and they make less money than their little sisters working at Burger King. And they continue to play.

3. About 5,000 players are playing Division I or NAIA college baseball for no compensation at all (but maybe $20K in college fees), and 90% know that they will never be offered a contract by an MLB team. And they continue to play.

4. All MLB players would still be eligible to make just as much money endorsing products and signing autographs at card shows and on trading card contracts.

Could MLB salaries be cut by two billion dollars, without significantly impacting the quality of the game?

Who do you think are the players that would refuse to play and end their career?

A) The quality of the game would suffer greatly and the bleachers would be empty, despite the low cost of tickets.

B) Have you gone to many minor league games? Even triple A games are hard to watch, unless you have a vested interest.

C) NO current Major league player would play for that, nor would I expect them to.

D) Minor league players earn what they do because of their talent level. Major League players are the best of the best. There are only about 600 humans on the planet who can play at their level, and about 50 who do it exceedingly well.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:35 PM
 
20,976 posts, read 16,268,006 times
Reputation: 10270
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowneline View Post
What else are most of these guys going to do? It's not like they would have high paying jobs in finance or law waiting for them.

And, even if they did, those desk jobs suck compared to playing a game for a living, where you get to travel the country, hang out with friends all day and get a 4 month vacation each year.

The bottom line is that for 80% of MLB players, playing baseball would be their only option at making $100,000 a year, so they would play. Another 10% might have good college degrees (not in Physical Education, or some other flimsy major) or connections that might get them decent desk jobs, but most would probably rather be playing baseball.

The last 10% might have a shot at another pro sport, and might take that option, but in the end I think it's a small portion of all current MLB players.
They would play in Japan.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,269,803 times
Reputation: 36087
One down effect, though, assuming other sports still paid multimillion dollar salaries, is that future athletes would develop their skills in other sports, and quit playing baseball.

It is interesting to note that the number of college baseball players who are black is very close to zero. Despite that, MLB still manages to find black players, although the number of African American players in MLB now is smaller than the number in 1980. Our college team here has no black players, and the opposing teams from east and south Texas and Louisiana usually don't have any black players, either. So I assume that a lot of black players played football or basketball in college, then chose baseball, their secondary sport, when they got drafted.

I doubt very much if more than a couple of current MLB players could walk into a pro football or basketball camp and make the traveling squad.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:36 PM
 
35,108 posts, read 40,247,428 times
Reputation: 62055
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
This calls for a hypothetical prediction. How many current MLB players would continue to play, if the maximum salary were wet at $100,000 a year?

Before you jump to a quick conclusion, consider these facts:

1. There are twice as many players playing in 6 independent leagues, most of whom were originally drafted by MLB teams. They make about $1,000 month, and continue to play.

2. Players under MLB contract in the lower minors (Class A and Rookie leagues) have almost no prospect of reaching the majors, and they make less money than their little sisters working at Burger King. And they continue to play.

3. About 5,000 players are playing Division I or NAIA college baseball for no compensation at all (but maybe $20K in college fees), and 90% know that they will never be offered a contract by an MLB team. And they continue to play.

4. All MLB players would still be eligible to make just as much money endorsing products and signing autographs at card shows and on trading card contracts.

Could MLB salaries be cut by two billion dollars, without significantly impacting the quality of the game?

Who do you think are the players that would refuse to play and end their career?

Let them refuse and good riddance. If owners would set a normal salary for ALL professional sports and the athletes take it fine, if they leave it there are plenty of others who are just as good who will play for a decent salary and the love of the game not just the money.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:36 PM
 
20,976 posts, read 16,268,006 times
Reputation: 10270
Quote:
Originally Posted by square peg View Post
Babe Ruth would have played for that amount, but that's a little rough around the edges as fair statements go...
He did....90 years ago.
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:38 PM
 
20,976 posts, read 16,268,006 times
Reputation: 10270
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Let them refuse and good riddance. If owners would set a normal salary for ALL professional sports and the athletes take it fine, if they leave it there are plenty of others who are just as good who will play for a decent salary and the love of the game not just the money.
Wanna bet?

Why is Alex Rodriguez earning $25 million a year?

Because his talent dictates that.

Without the level of talent in pro sports, nobody would watch.
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Old 03-21-2012, 06:24 AM
 
Location: Englewood, Near Eastside Indy
8,340 posts, read 14,102,864 times
Reputation: 5959
Quote:
Originally Posted by CSD610 View Post
Let them refuse and good riddance. If owners would set a normal salary for ALL professional sports and the athletes take it fine, if they leave it there are plenty of others who are just as good who will play for a decent salary and the love of the game not just the money.
No one is going to want to watch Frontier League level baseball on ESPN. If owners slash salaries like that, MLB becomes irrelevant. Sports salaries are where they are because the marketplace has dictated such.
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