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Old 05-24-2013, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
41,278 posts, read 18,634,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
I just noticed that now, there is a new baseball Oxymoron: Gold-glove Left-fielder.
Not sure what you mean here. Generally the outfielder assigned to left is the one with the weakest arm since left field requires the shortest throws. That does not mean that the player is automatically a bad outfielder. Barry Bonds won a number of Gold Gloves playing left field. He made up for his below average arm by being extremely fast in getting to balls.

Are you referencing the way the All Star ballots typically do not discriminate among the three outfield positions?
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Old 05-24-2013, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,412,150 times
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Before 2011, Gold Gloves were awarded to three outfielders, irrespective of their position, and it was very rare for a left fielder to get one. Of any team's three outfielders, the one who covers the most ground plays CF, the one with the best arm plays RF and the one who does neither with the a comparable level of competence plays LF. The Alfonso Sorianos and the Lou Brocks and the Del Ennises and Roy Sieverses and the Dave Kimgmans.

Obviously, it is possible to find in the annals a team that had three outfielders who were all fairly good defensively, but it requires some searching. If your left fielder wins the Gold Glove, why isn't he playing Right or Center, instead of a guy who did not win a Gold Glove? There was Yastrzemski, but he first of all specilized in Fenway's unique LF geography, and also confirms the adage that if you can't hit, you have to practically be from another planet to beat out a good hitter for a Gold Glove. You can almost count on your fingers the outfield gold gloves that were awarded to so-so hitters. Like a Gary Pettis or a Bob Dernier, and then the list thins out really fast. It was awarded to Mays, Aaron and Clemente virtually for life. Even Pete Rose won it a couple of times when they were desperately searching for a position he could play without being laughable. There's a LF who won it, playing alongside Vada Pinson, who didn't. Of the two, Rose was the Gold Glover. What a joke.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-24-2013 at 03:58 PM..
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Old 05-24-2013, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
41,278 posts, read 18,634,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Before 2011, Gold Gloves were awarded to three outfielders, irrespective of their position, and it was very rare for a left fielder to get one. Of any team's three outfielders, the one who covers the most ground plays CF, the one with the best arm plays RF and the one who does neither with the a comparable level of competence plays LF. The Alfonso Sorianos and the Lou Brocks and the Del Ennises and Roy Sieverses and the Dave Kimgmans.

Obviously, it is possible to find in the annals a team that had three outfielders who were all fairly good defensively, but it requires some searching. If your left fielder wins the Gold Glove, why isn't he playing Right or Center, instead of a guy who did not win a Gold Glove? There was Yastrzemski, but he first of all specilized in Fenway's unique LF geography, and also confirms the adage that if you can't hit, you have to practically be from another planet to beat out a good hitter for a Gold Glove. You can almost count on your fingers the outfield gold gloves that were awarded to so-so hitters. Like a Gary Pettis or a Bob Dernier, and then the list thins out really fast. It was awarded to Mays, Aaron and Clemente virtually for life. Even Pete Rose won it a couple of times when they were desperately searching for a position he could play without being laughable. There's a LF who won it, playing alongside Vada Pinson, who didn't. Of the two, Rose was the Gold Glover. What a joke.
Shortstop is more difficult to play than secondbase and the greater defensive talent winds up at short. So, why not instead of a gold glove for short and a gold glove for second, we have two gold gloves for "Middle Infielder" but always award them to shortstops?

As for your examples, Mays certainly deserved his gold gloves, the metrics support all the eyewitness tales of his splendor in the grass. Aaron only won three gold gloves, all very early in his career, none after the age of 26. It was Curt Flood, who won seven straight awards, who was dominant along with Mays and Clemente.
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Old 05-24-2013, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Mequon, WI
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I don't know if this qualifies as an oddity but Carlos Gomez just went 1-25 and his batting average is still .325 this stat is a couple of days old and is not as current of this post.
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Old 05-26-2013, 11:36 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Cardinals shortstop Pete Kozma went 4-for-4 today, seeing only six pitches. Twice, he doubled on the first pitch. Once he took a strike then singled, and once he fouled off a pitch then doubled.
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Old 05-27-2013, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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Cardinals Matt Carpenter has started at four different positions in the last five games. 3B 2B 1B RF
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:10 PM
 
3,962 posts, read 7,542,035 times
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This one is several days old, but no one has mentioned it.

It's kind of like the designated hitter, but going a bit further. The first baseman made a putout at first without having the ball, thanks to the pitcher who caught it for him and the umpire who heard a catch and jumped to a conclusion.

Umpire Jeff Nelson shoulders burden for missed call during Texas Rangers-Seattle Mariners game | Mariners.com: News
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
41,278 posts, read 18,634,241 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
This one is several days old, but no one has mentioned it.

It's kind of like the designated hitter, but going a bit further. The first baseman made a putout at first without having the ball, thanks to the pitcher who caught it for him and the umpire who heard a catch and jumped to a conclusion.

Umpire Jeff Nelson shoulders burden for missed call during Texas Rangers-Seattle Mariners game | Mariners.com: News
Good find. You watch a zillion ballgames and stuff that never happened before keeps happening.
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Old 05-29-2013, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,412,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
This one is several days old, but no one has mentioned it.

It's kind of like the designated hitter, but going a bit further. The first baseman made a putout at first without having the ball, thanks to the pitcher who caught it for him and the umpire who heard a catch and jumped to a conclusion.

Umpire Jeff Nelson shoulders burden for missed call during Texas Rangers-Seattle Mariners game | Mariners.com: News
That's a classic. It is reminiscent of the play in game 7 of the 1987 World Series, when Viola picked Herr off frist base, then got him in a rundown, and the ump called Herr out (after Hrbek had obstructed him) on a throw to Viola in the coaches box backing up first. Viola lunged at Herr, but came nowhere near him. Apparently the ump thought the rundown throw had gone to Hrbek, whom Herr had collided with, when the throw had gone to Viola off the bag, and Herr was never tagged. I think the score was tied at the time, which turned out to be a pivotal bad call in the series. Herr should have been awarded second on obstruction, instead of called out.

I cannot find that video on YouTube, although Game 6 is available in its entirety. The highlight videos are, of course, produced by Twins fans, who conveniently neglect that play. Herzog never made a big deal of it, to avoid a repetition of what happened two years earlier on the Denkinger call.

In both cases, the official scorer gave the putout to the pitcher, correctly observing that they were holding the ball when no putout was actually made.

By the way, when Galarraga was denied his no hitter by Jim Joyce's terrible call, the official scorer (in my opinion) could have ruled it an error, since a fielder with the ball had failed to make a putout, which could have been done with ordinary effort.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-29-2013 at 08:21 AM..
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Old 05-30-2013, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,412,150 times
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An interesting development in progress in St. Louis tonight, which might call for the rare invocation of rule 10.12(a)(4)
Any suspended game not completed prior to the last scheduled game between
the two teams during the championship season shall become a called game, as
follows:
(i) If such game has progressed far enough to become a regulation game,
and one team is ahead, the team that is ahead shall be declared the winner
(unless the game is called while an inning is in progress and before
the inning is completed, and the visiting team has scored one or more
runs to take the lead,
and the home team has not retaken the lead, in
which case the score upon the completion of the last full inning shall
stand for purposes of this Rule 4.12(b)(4));

The Cardinals going into the 9th with a 2-1 lead, the Royals score 3, but then it ranis and Cardinals have not yet batted. Rain is apparently likely to not permit resumption of pley. This would be a suspended game, if not completed in this inning. However, it is the final meeting of the two clubs in interleague play. The score reverts back to the last completed inning, which is 2-1 St. Louis, and becomes a called game. (The announcers have not mentioned this.)

The present radar looks l like the rain will last at least until about 1 oclock am. My guess is, at 11:30, that they will wait however long it takes and play the last three outs.

Last edited by jtur88; 05-30-2013 at 10:41 PM..
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