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Old 04-16-2013, 08:57 AM
 
Location: NY
9,071 posts, read 15,047,466 times
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As a catcher, I would say it is because it just adds some complication with the throw to second.

A lefty catcher, as would mention, would have a natural tendancy for the ball to arc away from the sliding runner as it got to second.

Also, with there being more right handed batters, the lefty catcher's throwing arm would more frequently be on the side with the batter. That can add complication or distraction when you got to come up and fire the throw down to 2nd depending on how close to the plate the batter is, where the pitch is, etc. Not that right throwing catchers do not face this with left handed batters, but the the percentages are less.

Maybe all that is overthinking it too. Maybe little league teams just don't buy left handed catchers mitts, due to the greater percentage of right handed people. As such, lefties just might not be encouraged or developed at young ages to get into catching. Plus, any lefty with a seriously good arm is probably encouraged to pitch, since hard throwing lefties are valuable and rare!
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Old 04-16-2013, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,292,936 times
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I used to go to a lot of games in the Nicaraguan League, and noticed that there are almost no lefties, batting or throwing, at any position. I think only one team had a LH pitcher and a LH batter. I asked my friend why that is, and after thinking about for a moment, he explained that every kid in Nicaragua grows up cutting sugar cane, and nobody wants to be in a cane field with somebody swinging a machete left handed.
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Checkered24 View Post
As a catcher, I would say it is because it just adds some complication with the throw to second.

A lefty catcher, as would mention, would have a natural tendancy for the ball to arc away from the sliding runner as it got to second.

Also, with there being more right handed batters, the lefty catcher's throwing arm would more frequently be on the side with the batter. That can add complication or distraction when you got to come up and fire the throw down to 2nd depending on how close to the plate the batter is, where the pitch is, etc. Not that right throwing catchers do not face this with left handed batters, but the the percentages are less.

Maybe all that is overthinking it too. Maybe little league teams just don't buy left handed catchers mitts, due to the greater percentage of right handed people. As such, lefties just might not be encouraged or developed at young ages to get into catching. Plus, any lefty with a seriously good arm is probably encouraged to pitch, since hard throwing lefties are valuable and rare!
That's possible. Though I played baseball as a lefty and the coaches would always put me in right field. Definitely was not allowed anywhere near the infield.
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:42 PM
 
Location: DMV
10,136 posts, read 11,652,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkansas Mac View Post
There is a reason we don't see many left handed 2b,ss,or 3b.

Could you imagine a left handed 2b completing the double play on a short-2nd-1st double play ?
I concur. I am left handed and when I played little league, I played 2nd base sometimes. It was very difficult to turn a double play because I would have to turn my body just to throw to first, while a right handed thrower can do it in one motion.
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Old 04-16-2013, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,177 posts, read 4,642,870 times
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As a guy who caught my whole young life up until I was 36 (amateur baseball) I can say that the only negative for a lefty catching rather than a right hander is you are throwing "over" the batter more often when guys are stealing 2nd. This is the case for the young catcher all the way through high school since there are at least 3 to 4 right handed batters for every left handed batter.

This problem really evens out in college, minor league ball, and of course major league baseball as more often this level of player has often been taught to bat left handed. Without doing a player for player analysis, I'd guess that there are just as many left handed batters in the bigs as right handed batters. The advantages for a right handed throwing player batting left are huge. Your dominant hand (right hand) is on the bottom of the bat which is where your power is. Your dominant eye is most often your right eye and it's closer to the pitcher. And of course, you're 2 steps closer to 1st base.

It would be an easier throw to 3rd base as a lefty catcher. No disadvantage there.

I think that we'll see a left handed catcher someday in the majors.
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Old 04-20-2013, 10:54 AM
 
Location: County of Slight Imperturbation
536 posts, read 442,397 times
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Because they would have to step out further to avoid mostly right handed batters on a throw to second. And a quick snap pickoff to first is also easier because you don't have to shift to the right to let er rip.Most batters are right handed. And there's many less throws to third really.Coming out of the crouch to throw to second takes a split second longer if you have to throw to second, and that can be the difference in a pickoff or a stolen base.
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Old 04-20-2013, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,663 posts, read 74,292,936 times
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Catcher's mitts are, nowdays, all "trappers", in which the ball is caught in the webbing. Unlike the 50s, when it was a round mitt in which the catcher caught the ball in the palm of his hand. So, is there any reason why a lefty catcher couldn't catch using a first-baseman's mitt, making it practical at the little league or high school level? Maybe somebody with experience catching could comment on that.
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Old 04-20-2013, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
3,177 posts, read 4,642,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Catcher's mitts are, nowdays, all "trappers", in which the ball is caught in the webbing. Unlike the 50s, when it was a round mitt in which the catcher caught the ball in the palm of his hand. So, is there any reason why a lefty catcher couldn't catch using a first-baseman's mitt, making it practical at the little league or high school level? Maybe somebody with experience catching could comment on that.
Easy answer to your question. Yes, you're right as to the hinged catchers mitts of today, courtesy of Johnny Bench. You can catch with it basically like a fielders glove.

Unless you've caught major like speed pitching (I have) you have no idea how hard a fastball or snapping slider hits your glove. The palm of your hand will swell up where you can't even close your hand using a first baseman's mitt. There is a lot more padding in a good quality catchers mitt. I had a foam pad that I inserted in my glove because even with a newer well padded catchers mitt if a pitcher really throws hard, it stings.

I often played with gloves that were getting wore out and found myself batting with my index finger sticking straight out because I couldn't close my hand around the bat by the end of the game.

At the little league and high school level (depending on the pitcher because some high schoolers can already throw heat), you could use a first baseman's mitt
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Lewes, Delaware
3,466 posts, read 3,151,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Checkered24 View Post
As a catcher, I would say it is because it just adds some complication with the throw to second.

A lefty catcher, as would mention, would have a natural tendancy for the ball to arc away from the sliding runner as it got to second.

Also, with there being more right handed batters, the lefty catcher's throwing arm would more frequently be on the side with the batter. That can add complication or distraction when you got to come up and fire the throw down to 2nd depending on how close to the plate the batter is, where the pitch is, etc. Not that right throwing catchers do not face this with left handed batters, but the the percentages are less.

Maybe all that is overthinking it too. Maybe little league teams just don't buy left handed catchers mitts, due to the greater percentage of right handed people. As such, lefties just might not be encouraged or developed at young ages to get into catching. Plus, any lefty with a seriously good arm is probably encouraged to pitch, since hard throwing lefties are valuable and rare!
That's exactly right, when I grew up in the '80s playing catcher in little league and thru high school, there were no left handed catchers. Imagine trying to throw out a base runner stealing third with a right handed batter. It can be done, but its that much harder, plus if most little leagues and coaches believe a left handed catcher is a no no, imagine how hard it is for a lefty catcher to make it in the pros. You need to start young at any sport to make it professional, for the most part.

I was considered an idiot as a coach for playing our best fielder who was left handed at shortstop and a right hander at first. I was idiot until we made district playoffs, then I was an innovator. This was back in the mid '90s.

Baseball has so many hidden, secret rules and still does. The clean up, power guy has to bat 4th, the best hitter should hit third, the fast contact guys need to hit first. Its all BS. I always batted our best hitter 2nd, and the power hitter third. Sometimes the best part of baseball (tradition) is its biggest enemy. Look at an old timer like Charlie's Manuel, to see my point.
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Old 05-05-2013, 10:30 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,176,306 times
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Two main things

1 - Pitchers basically spend their whole life throwing to right handed catchers. The glove angle and target is totally different for a left hander, pithcers would not like this at all

2 - there are more right handed batters, thus the natural throw is less impeded more frequently
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