Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports > Baseball
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-30-2008, 11:25 PM
 
2,516 posts, read 5,689,650 times
Reputation: 4672

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by FightinPhils View Post
Of course you had to get a dig in at Philly there, didn't you. I've been an Eagles and Phillies fan for a couple of decades now and have never witnessed anything like this. This is further proof that Philly is not as bad as some believe and that rivalries like Cubs-White Sox and Yankees-Red Sox can get more brutal and ridiculous than anything in Philly.

But, yeah, we Philly fans are the worst for booing Santa in the 1960s.....
No offense dude, but the Eagles are the only team I know of that had an actual judge and courtroom on location to handle fans at one time. You can't play that innocent garbage here.

* At a December 10, 1989 game dubbed "Bounty Bowl II" against the Dallas Cowboys, the city failed to clear the stadium following a snowstorm. Fans threw snowballs, batteries, beer, and other larger objects onto the field, pelting Cowboys players and coaching staff, NFL officials, and one another. Future Mayor of Philadelphia and current Pennsylvania Governor Edward Rendell got caught up in the fallout from that game when he admitted to a reporter that he had bet another fan $20 that he couldn't reach the field with a snowball. (It can be seen from the videotape that Dallas Cowboys' head coach Jimmy Johnson was, in fact, pelted in the head with a snowball.)[8] As a result, the team added security and banned beer sales for their last remaining home game of the regular season. [9]

* During a November 10, 1997, Monday Night Football game against the San Francisco 49ers, the Eagles fans, in a 24-12 loss, infuriated by a number of calls by the officials and poor play by the Eagles, engaged in a number of highly visible, large-scale brawls on national television. In the last quarter, one fan fired a flare gun across the stadium into empty seats in the 700 level. Shortly thereafter, the infamous Veterans Stadium courtroom was established.[10]

* A contingent of Eagles fans traveled to the 1999 NFL Draft in New York to jeer the Eagles' selection of anyone other than Heisman Trophy-winning running back Ricky Williams. Local radio hosts, notably Angelo Cataldi of 610 WIP (AM), had recruited thirty boorishly behaving fans, self-styled as the "Dirty Thirty", to protest the selection of quarterback Donovan McNabb. McNabb has since become a successful sports figure, while Williams has had numerous off-field problems, hampering his career. This has led to criticism of the "Dirty Thirty" and their radio-host instigators.

* In a October 10, 1999 game against division rival Dallas Cowboys, Cowboys wide receiver Michael Irvin was knocked unconscious when his head hit the Vet's hard artificial-turf-covered cement field after a catch. As Irvin lay immobile on the turf, some Eagles fans cheered. Irvin was later diagnosed with a career-ending broken neck. In that game, the Eagles rallied from a 10-0 deficit to gain their first victory of the season, 13-10.[11]

Acts of violence by Eagles fans against fans of visiting teams, combined with ongoing difficulties with public drunkenness, prompted Philadelphia municipal judge Seamus McCaffrey and the Philadelphia Police Department to establish a small courtroom inside the Vet in 1997. Additionally, plainclothes officers dressed in the colors of the visiting team were assigned to sit in sections (mostly in the Vet's notorious "700 Level" upperdeck) known as being dangerous to opposing fans. By 1999, incidents of fan misbehavior had diminished to the point that the courtroom was no longer needed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-01-2008, 08:31 AM
 
Location: TwilightZone
5,296 posts, read 6,477,696 times
Reputation: 1031
I agree on the Philly stuff because I live in the heart of it!
Plus last week another jerk got drunk(at a kids party also) and started shooting off his mouth at my neighbor...typical Philly behaviour.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2008, 09:37 AM
 
4,416 posts, read 9,143,570 times
Reputation: 4318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ankhharu View Post
This is taking your fanaticism a little too seriously.

Cubs fans charged with beating White Sox fan at child’s party - Rockford, IL - Rockford Register Star


Typically it seems this type of behavior is more common with Philly Eagle fans or Oakland Raider fans. I'm probably more disturbed at some of the remarks left last night at the bottom of the article that have now been removed as they were obviously flagged, things like "wimpy sox fan" and other uncalled rhetoric. I guess this is the sorry state our society is in and it's only getting worse.


Chicago has been catching up for a while.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,520 posts, read 9,242,679 times
Reputation: 2469
Quote:
Originally Posted by FightinPhils View Post
Of course you had to get a dig in at Philly there, didn't you. I've been an Eagles and Phillies fan for a couple of decades now and have never witnessed anything like this. This is further proof that Philly is not as bad as some believe and that rivalries like Cubs-White Sox and Yankees-Red Sox can get more brutal and ridiculous than anything in Philly.

But, yeah, we Philly fans are the worst for booing Santa in the 1960s.....
Oh come on. EVERYBODY knows (especially the NYC-based national media and New England-based ESPN) that Philadelphia sports fans are the heathens of not only the entire planet, but the entire galaxy! I mean, the media is never wrong!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2008, 10:28 AM
 
Location: TwilightZone
5,296 posts, read 6,477,696 times
Reputation: 1031
Really,it is widely known. What other city do you know of that has a reputation so bad that fans of opposing teams are actually scared to go there?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2008, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Silver Spring, MD/Washington DC
3,520 posts, read 9,242,679 times
Reputation: 2469
Quote:
Originally Posted by StuckPA View Post
Really,it is widely known. What other city do you know of that has a reputation so bad that fans of opposing teams are actually scared to go there?
What other city has had bad sports fan behavior incidents talked about in the national media for years and years after they happened besides Philadelphia? I mean, you never hear about all the snowballs thrown at a 1995 New York Giants game by fans at players/coaches/officials on the field and at each other in the stands. You never hear about how Pittsburgh greeted former Steelers quarterback Cliff Stoudt with snowballs when he came back to the Steel City playing in the USFL against the Pittsburgh Maulers in 1984. You never hear about the fights that have occurred between players and fans in the stands that I believe occurred earlier in this decade in both Chicago baseball parks. You never hear how Cleveland Browns fans threw dog bones, beer bottles, and who knows what else onto the field as the opposing team and officials left the field after a game earlier in this decade after a poor call may have cost the Browns the game. Heck, the whole ugly incident that occurred in Detroit a few years ago at a Pistons/Pacers game with fans throwing bottles at the players and Ron Artest and company fighting with fans in the stands is relatively glossed over.

I don't think anyone would argue, including Philadelphia sports fans themselves, that Philly fans do deserve their reputation for being boorish at times. (Of course, like fans in all cities, the percentage of boorish fans is actually pretty small, but the negative behavior understandably attracts a disproportionate amount of attention.) But let's be honest here - fans in just about ALL cities have exhibited boorish or in some cases downright dangerous behavior at some point in the past. Philadelphia is by no means alone in that regard, but it IS alone or at least largely alone in having its incidents talked about in the media for years and years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2008, 08:56 PM
 
Location: yeah
5,717 posts, read 16,354,636 times
Reputation: 2975
These inter-league rivalries are beyond stupid. The two teams don't ever compete directly unless they meet in the World Series, minus the couple (out of 162) games of the regular season, which don't reflect their relative position in the standings. People are so ****ing dumb.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-01-2008, 09:15 PM
 
Location: TwilightZone
5,296 posts, read 6,477,696 times
Reputation: 1031
Actually I was never really into sports until I ended up in Philly 5 years ago,then I got a crash course!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-02-2008, 06:58 AM
 
715 posts, read 1,670,339 times
Reputation: 290
Regarding Bartman....it's funny to me that Cubs fans are so tough on the guy. They haven't won a championship in 100 years now (95 years at the time of the Bartman incident). So why blame him? Why not blame 95-100 years on the real culprit...which is BAD BASEBALL.

In years where no Bartman incident happened, the Cubs didn't win a series....why am I to think they would have won it in 2003? They still had the chance to win game 6 after Bartman and they still had game 7 to play...and they choked. That, Cubs fans, is not Bartman's fault.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2008, 02:18 PM
 
2 posts, read 8,697 times
Reputation: 12
Default Safety @ Cubs-White Sox Games

My boyfriend is a White Sox fan, and I am a Cubs fan (primarily a Twins fan however). We are making a trip to Chicago in June during interleague play to see the Sox play the Cubs at Wrigley (as well as see a Detroit/Sox game at US Cellular and a Twins/Cubs game.) My question to any of you who live in Chicago is what kind of danger could a person be in if they wear a Sox jersey at Wrigley, especially during the "crosstown classic"? Is that asking for too much trouble, or will the Cubs fans not really care? I know there's a lot of boozin goin on in & around Wrigley, so I suspect things could get out of hand. I could wear my Cubs shirt if that would help matters any We really just want to go and have a great time, so any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Sports > Baseball
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top