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Old 06-24-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: WA
4,081 posts, read 5,176,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BendLocal View Post
In the Redmond SD 54% of the students are on the lunch program. They show that 77% of the students in the district are white. A family of 6 would quality for the lunch program with a household income of $62,419. They don't report the percentage of qualifying families enrolled in the program but when a town has a median income of $50K and over 50% of the students are on the lunch program it is reasonable to hypothesize that many families that qualify for the lunch program are using it regardless of race.

And the number of families that will be eligible in the future is increasing.

https://mailtribune.com/news/happeni...ram-05-17-2019
Interesting. Oregon is the only state I know of that is doing this. But from the article it is something the legislature just passed as part of their new education tax measure that will likely be referred to the votors in 2020. So isn't something that would be reflected in any existing data for prior school years. If this measure goes into effect though it will obviously change all the data and make comparisions to prior years difficult or meaningless. In other words, a lot of districts will appear to have a jump in poorer students in 2019-2020 when all that really happened is a change in the way the program is administrated.

That is the problem when you collect information for one purpose and then use it for another.
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Old 06-24-2019, 11:49 AM
 
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Here is a site that has eligibility data.

https://www.ode.state.or.us/sfda/rep...061Select2.asp

For the last school year

38.1% of the Bend Lapine SD was eligible for the lunch program compared to 42.6% in the Redmond SD. Relatively small difference. The affluent Lake Oswego SD was at 7.4%
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Old 06-24-2019, 02:31 PM
 
50 posts, read 37,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thom52 View Post
The weather, especially with regards to "amount of sunshine" is relative.

If you moved here from somewhere like Seattle then it is "Sunny all the time!"

If you moved here from Southern California then it is "I didn't expect so many cloudy days".

We came from gray western WA and definitely notice you can spot the long time locals and people that moved from South CA by the amount of sun damage to their skin.

I would suggest being more concerned about your tolerance to dust and smoke. That is what caught my wife and me by surprise.

Dust is on and in everything. I have pretty much adapted to that. Plus side is it is easier to wash off my cars than caked on mud and road sludge of a wetter climate.

What really shocked us is the amount of smoke. The air in Central Oregon is amazingly clear on the several days there is not smoke in the air. In Winter, you have people burning fireplaces and wood stoves. As soon as the snow starts to melt in Spring you have controlled burning with huge plumes of smoke towering over the area. In Summer you have smoke from Forest fires, local and traveling into the area from as far as CA and Canada. In Fall they go back to controlled burns until the snow gets significant.
wow. thanks for that info. that is something i would never have thought of.
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Old 06-24-2019, 05:30 PM
 
50 posts, read 37,311 times
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[quote=texasdiver;55490190]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monaisa View Post

Schools in the wealthy white suburbs of Texas are exceptionally good and have resources beyond what most Oregon schools could imagine. Because there is a TON of money in Texas and schools are mostly funded by local property taxes. Texas also doesn't have the supermajority requirements to pass school bonds so it is MUCH MUCH easier for communities in TX to pass school bond measures compared to either OR or WA. So you see a lot of extravagent stuff like $60 million HS football stadiums:



And Olympic size HS nadatoriums



And full size indoor football practice facilities. This is the one from the school where I used to teach.



And a lot of the school facilities themselves like science labs and music rooms are just as nice, just not as easy to show in pictures. Basically the rich suburbs in Texas are a LOT LOT richer than the rich suburbs in Oregon and the schools reflect that.

On the other hand, poor and minority schools and schools in declining rural areas can be among the worst you'll find anywhere. Especially small rural towns in east Texas that are predominantly black.

Bottom line though, Texas does have a MUCH MUCH higher graduation rate of 90% compared to oregon at 76% or Washington at 79%, even among the minority populations. And it has a LOT more minority populations than Oregon or Washington so they are doing some things right. https://nces.ed.gov/ccd/tables/ACGR_...cs_2016-17.asp

As for the weather in Redmond. According to the weather stats, Redmond gets about 10 inches of rain per year compared to about 37 inches in Portland and most cities west of the Cascades so it is a lot drier and has more of a semi-arid desert type feel. As for how many gray days? I have no idea. Mostly always sunny when I pass through but the people who live there or Bend would have a better idea. I would imagine the overcast gray skies would mostly be a winter thing though.

Honestly if you just want to move someplace with a low cost of living, nice houses, good schools and good medical care you could do worse than Texas. Your money would go a LOT farther in TX. For example, right in the middle of your price range you could buy a brand new house in Katy TX which is a fast growing suburb west of Houston. I have friends there (doctors) who have their kids in the local schools and could afford to live anywyere. Something like this: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1...86641711_zpid/ which would be in a nice neighborhood with all kinds of amenities like community pools, trails, playgrounds and very good well funded schools. It will be a lot more Republican place than most of where you are looking. But most people in places like Katy are transplants from places like CA so pretty neutral politically for the most part. You can find similar suburbs around Dallas like for example. Here is Rockwall which is along a lake east of Dallas. We also have friends (also doctors) who live here and like it. Good schools: https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1...60208751_zpid/

I had thought about Texas for a while. One of my clients lived in Arlington, and she said it the heat just hits you in the face when you open the door. So I scratched it off my list.

Do you know of any area of Texas that has a bit milder weather...less humid and at least stays under 100 degrees in the summer?

Like you said, the schools are very good and the houses you linked to are beautiful. I just want to be able to do some activities outside without having a heat stroke.
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Old 06-24-2019, 06:46 PM
 
Location: WA
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[quote=Monaisa;55505472]
Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post


I had thought about Texas for a while. One of my clients lived in Arlington, and she said it the heat just hits you in the face when you open the door. So I scratched it off my list.

Do you know of any area of Texas that has a bit milder weather...less humid and at least stays under 100 degrees in the summer?

Like you said, the schools are very good and the houses you linked to are beautiful. I just want to be able to do some activities outside without having a heat stroke.
No, there isn't any place in Texas that doesn't get hot in the summer. We lived there for 13 years and I discovered that you basically have to drive about 500 miles to reach cooler weather in peak summer. All the way to the New Mexico Rockies, or the mountains of Arkanasas where it will still be hot, but just not 105 degree hot.

That said, every place you want to live except perhaps Honolulu is going to have a period of time during the year when you spend most of your time in climate controlled environments. In Texas that is the middle of the summer. In Spokane or Bend that is November - March. It is just opposite seasons. Texas has glorious weather much of the rest of the year especially spring and fall with short cold snaps in mid-winter. If you lived someplace like Katy (first picture) you'd get through the summer heat by hanging around the community pool and inside in air conditioning as every place you ever go has air conditioning. And you do your long walks and gardening and outside stuff in the mornings and evenings. I you live in Spokane you aren't going to do much outside in the winter anyway either.

Honestly there really is no perfect place. Well, at least there is no perfect place that most of us can afford. If you can afford to live in La Jolla California in eternal spring weather then fine, go for it. But the median home price is $1.6 million.

I've lived a lot of different places and frankly in your position with a limited income and the ability to live anywhere and just wanting a nice home and school for your child and access to medical care for your mother, I would give some serious thought to Texas. First, you are going to get a LOT more for your money. Second, your employement prospects should you ever decide or be forced to change jobs is going to be much better in the TX suburbs than in one of these resort type towns.
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Old 06-24-2019, 08:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texasdiver View Post
In Spokane or Bend that is November - March.
This area has many people that look forward to the winter weather. Based on his fantastic pictures I'd guess Thom is often outside during that period. I probably spend more time outside in the winter than I do in the summer.
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Old 06-25-2019, 12:43 AM
 
169 posts, read 173,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BendLocal View Post
I probably spend more time outside in the winter than I do in the summer.
Same here, especially when the smoke hits.
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Old 06-25-2019, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Bend OR
788 posts, read 748,972 times
Reputation: 1561
Quote:
Originally Posted by BendLocal View Post
This area has many people that look forward to the winter weather. Based on his fantastic pictures I'd guess Thom is often outside during that period. I probably spend more time outside in the winter than I do in the summer.
I do spend a lot of time outside in Winter here. Of course some of that time is spent shoveling snow, but that is not necessarily every year in Bend. Bottom line is that I spend a lot of time outside. But I will say the bouts of heavy smoke are probably the main deal killer for going outside for me. You can sometimes dodge the plumes of controlled burning smoke by following the burn reports combined with watching the wind direction. The overall summer forest fire smoke is harder/impossible to dodge.

I have lived in the Bay Area CA, where the weather is "nice" for 6 months out of the year to the point of boring. Plus to me it is a pleasant place to live, but is never Spectacular. I lived in Western WA for 31 years, where it is a spectacular place to live, but the gray and getting out for slog fests just wears you down after a decade or two. Oregon is not quite as spectacular as WA for scenery, but I find the opportunities and weather for outdoor activities is frigging amazing. Even with Bend's "long Winter" I find I am doing and enjoying outdoor activities for more days per year than in soggy Western WA. Plus the mountain trails thaw out faster and are more accessible than in Washington.

Notice that all the amazing Texas school facilities are based on their Football Culture. Anything football related is funded richly and extensively. If you are into football this is awesome.....otherwise you might want to poke a bit deeper into what is funded well.

Bottom line is that Mayberry was only a fantasy TV show. There are always tradeoffs.
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Old 06-27-2019, 08:06 AM
 
35 posts, read 42,600 times
Reputation: 78
Very well said.

[quote=texasdiver;55505983]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monaisa View Post

No, there isn't any place in Texas that doesn't get hot in the summer. We lived there for 13 years and I discovered that you basically have to drive about 500 miles to reach cooler weather in peak summer. All the way to the New Mexico Rockies, or the mountains of Arkanasas where it will still be hot, but just not 105 degree hot.

That said, every place you want to live except perhaps Honolulu is going to have a period of time during the year when you spend most of your time in climate controlled environments. In Texas that is the middle of the summer. In Spokane or Bend that is November - March. It is just opposite seasons. Texas has glorious weather much of the rest of the year especially spring and fall with short cold snaps in mid-winter. If you lived someplace like Katy (first picture) you'd get through the summer heat by hanging around the community pool and inside in air conditioning as every place you ever go has air conditioning. And you do your long walks and gardening and outside stuff in the mornings and evenings. I you live in Spokane you aren't going to do much outside in the winter anyway either.

Honestly there really is no perfect place. Well, at least there is no perfect place that most of us can afford. If you can afford to live in La Jolla California in eternal spring weather then fine, go for it. But the median home price is $1.6 million.

I've lived a lot of different places and frankly in your position with a limited income and the ability to live anywhere and just wanting a nice home and school for your child and access to medical care for your mother, I would give some serious thought to Texas. First, you are going to get a LOT more for your money. Second, your employement prospects should you ever decide or be forced to change jobs is going to be much better in the TX suburbs than in one of these resort type towns.
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Old 06-27-2019, 09:41 AM
 
2,539 posts, read 3,354,485 times
Reputation: 3592
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thom52 View Post
The overall summer forest fire smoke is harder/impossible to dodge.
IMO, the number of days that are unhealthy due to smoke are still relatively low but if these fires continue to increase in number and size that may not be the case 10 years from now.

Unfortunately wildfires and the smoke they produce are a problem from Florida to Alaska.

https://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2019/0...t-will-spread/

Quote:
Climate change in the Western U.S. means more intense and frequent wildfires churning out waves of smoke that scientists say will sweep across the continent to affect tens of millions of people and cause a spike in premature deaths.

That emerging reality is prompting people in cities and rural areas alike to prepare for another summer of sooty skies along the West Coast and in the Rocky Mountains — the regions widely expected to suffer most from blazes tied to dryer, warmer conditions.
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...231943508.html

Quote:
A wildfire sparked by lightning continued on a destructive path through the Everglades Tuesday, resulting in a total of more than 33,000 acres burned.
As wildfires grow in Interior Alaska, smoky days could become the norm | Alerts | newsminer.com

Quote:
As wildfires grow in Interior Alaska, smoky days could become the norm
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