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Old 09-13-2007, 07:00 AM
 
118 posts, read 468,818 times
Reputation: 50

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1. Call the POLICE and CODE ENFORCEMENT - EVERY time you see something criminal, suspicious, or a quality of life violation. You can remain anonymous or confidential if you chose.

2. Learn the email addresses of ALL relevant government agencies, then write emails to them ALL including your elected officials, and make them aware of and accountable to ALL issues and your personal concerns.

Be aware you will sometimes probably hear how there isn't enough money to hire enough people to address the issues. That doesn't matter, you will see that they won't like the heat and attention, and they will try harder. You CAN'T blame only them, they too would like things to improve. Everybody that complains must share the responsibility to chip in and lend a hand in fighting this scourge. It's called Community Policing. You don't have to wear a uniform to police your homes and community.

3. In NYC years ago when the city was ridden with crime and failing infrastructure, a theory called something like "The broken window theory," was instituted. It was based upon the premise that immediately addressing the small things like fixng a broken window, cleaning up graffiti, garbage and abandoned vehicles in direpair, would have an poitive effect on the population. It would instill pride in one's community and encourage greater cooperation among neighbors in addressing problems. The theory was to start with the small things and work up to the bigger things in time. A clean neighborhood did not attract criminals. The results were a success.

Proud Punians should start this NOW!
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Old 09-13-2007, 09:52 AM
Status: "Make it worth my time..." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Pāhoa, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
1,861 posts, read 3,639,117 times
Reputation: 1591
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paddywagons View Post
Proud Punians should start this NOW!
Mahalo for giving me a good laugh.

If I reported my pakalolo-growing, rooster-fighting, building-code violating neighbors to the authorities, they'd probably have a good laugh as well.

Puna is not New York City. While I can leave my doors unlocked in Puna, many New Yorkers often have to "triple-bolt" their doors and set burglar alarms. "Community policing" would probably be no more effective in Puna than the "coconut wireless."
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Old 09-13-2007, 11:49 AM
 
118 posts, read 468,818 times
Reputation: 50
I'm happy you're having a laugh. The irony that we can laugh in the face of tragedy demonstrates a wonderful human quality.

Not everybody immediately buys into community policing concepts. It's just easier to sit on the sidelines and wait for others to do something while things just remain the same or even worse - decline.

Actually, I like roosters too! It wasn't the roosters I was referring to anywhere. NYC became a cesspool because nobody did anything for so long except wear blinders. It doesn't matter where crime and decay occur, it's all the same - it sucks and once you become a victim, you'll understand. If you have no problem with things as they are - God love you, you're blessed. I though, like many others, have the right to fight back. I hope you dwell on this and maybe one day get involved. I bet you would be able to discern what is important and what's not. You're obviously intelligent and we crime-fighters need people like you especially.

By the way, I have no intention of becoming a crusader or recommending anything so drastic. I just think the meth, the larcenies, the burglaries, the panhandling for drug money is out of control in Puna. I don't think even you could disagree with that.

Honestly, I only want things to improve enough to live with less worries about crime. I don't want to rock the boat in any other way.

I do appreciate your input, you're funny!

When's the last time you were in NYC? I watched it decline and then resurge into a decent place because of community policing concepts. I remember that in the mid-80's the murder rate in NYC was approximately 3,000 people per year. Please check on that fact as I know it seems unbelievable. After the community policing methods took hold, it dropped to approximately 500 !!! That repeated itself in so many cities that instituted pro-active policing concepts, most based on the community policing method.

I ask you to give it a chance for everybody's good. I was extremely cynical when it was first introduced, but the facts speak for themself. NYC may again have a crime increase as so many factors can affect the rate, but without the community doing at least something to try stop a rise in cirme, it can get really ugly eventually, even in precious Puna! I happen to have land in Puna and love it. I want to semi-retire there in about a year and a half. I will not be calling on the rooster police though!!
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Old 09-13-2007, 02:43 PM
Status: "Make it worth my time..." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Pāhoa, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
1,861 posts, read 3,639,117 times
Reputation: 1591
Puna was much worse in the '70s and '80s than it is now and it's reputation as the "Wild West" of Hawai'i was well-deserved. I can remember when there was a shootout at Luquin's and the Pahoa police substation was under siege. Fortunately, gentrification taken the rough edges away from Puna and it's still small enough so that everyone knows each other's business. If my TV set goes missing, chances are that "Bruddah Kimo" around the corner "borrowed" it. If my lawnmower goes missing, I can probably go down the street and find in it "Tutu Emily's" yard.

Kona is the part of the Big Island that probably needs "community policing" the most. All the gated subdivisions and security measures that folks have taken haven't put much of a dent in the crime rate there. It helps to know one's neighbors -- something that many folks in Kona seem to have forgotten.
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Old 09-13-2007, 08:46 PM
 
126 posts, read 470,213 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonah K View Post
Fortunately, gentrification taken the rough edges away from Puna and it's still small enough so that everyone knows each other's business. If my TV set goes missing, chances are that "Bruddah Kimo" around the corner "borrowed" it. If my lawnmower goes missing, I can probably go down the street and find in it "Tutu Emily's" yard.

I would argue that the high rate of burglaries in places like Paradise Park constrasts this statement. Meth addiction is an hungry beast, and PP is easity pickings because the houses are just far enough apart for privacy during a burglary, but not too remote to be cased out from the road.
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Old 09-13-2007, 10:18 PM
Status: "Make it worth my time..." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Pāhoa, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
1,861 posts, read 3,639,117 times
Reputation: 1591
Quote:
Originally Posted by IntoTheMystic View Post
I would argue that the high rate of burglaries in places like Paradise Park constrasts this statement. Meth addiction is an hungry beast, and PP is easity pickings because the houses are just far enough apart for privacy during a burglary, but not too remote to be cased out from the road.
HPP is one of the fastest-growing subdivisions in Hawai'i. Unfortunately, the influx of newcomers, the propensity to "flaunt one's wealth," and the lack of familiarity with the locals can make some folks "easy pickings." The local cops know who the most of the "meth" addicts are; however, some of them have a "conflict of interest" when it comes to prosecuting their friends and relatives. The public officials also tend to have the same "conflicts of interest."

I would love to eliminate all crime on the Big Island; however, as long as the current "old boys" network exists in Hawai'i, I don't expect much.
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Old 09-14-2007, 06:45 PM
 
126 posts, read 470,213 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonah K View Post
HPP is one of the fastest-growing subdivisions in Hawai'i. Unfortunately, the influx of newcomers, the propensity to "flaunt one's wealth," and the lack of familiarity with the locals can make some folks "easy pickings." .
What familiarity would prevent having the chain cut, the dog shot, and the house robbed while at work? They rob indescriminantly, wether one is flaunting wealth or not. Methheads will steal half a roll of toilet paper if it can be sold for money. Besides the statistics, my anecdotes include 2 local families in modest houses, one transplant in a two room cabin off the grid, and one other transplant with a house full of kids.
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Old 09-14-2007, 10:37 PM
Status: "Make it worth my time..." (set 4 days ago)
 
Location: Pāhoa, HI & Manhattan Beach, CA
1,861 posts, read 3,639,117 times
Reputation: 1591
Quote:
Originally Posted by IntoTheMystic View Post
Methheads will steal half a roll of toilet paper if it can be sold for money.
I wonder who's purchasing the items that the methheads have for sale...

Here's a hypothetical exchange at a police substation somewhere in Puna...
Officer Lopaka: Hey brah, no mo toilet paper in da lua!
Officer Koa: No problem, I get half roll from Cousin Harry on da corner. He sell 'em for 5 cents.
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Old 09-15-2007, 06:33 PM
 
118 posts, read 468,818 times
Reputation: 50
Thank you guys for the revelation. I don't know jack sh** about what's being done to fight crime in Puna. I just hear all the complaints and check out the crime statistics to keep abreast of things. Crime is such an important issue to me that I want to chip in to fight it in some way, thus my support for community policing.

I'm still stuck on the mainland for about a year and a half more when I will do everything in my power to move to the Big Island.

I happen to love all of the island with it's diversity, but I chose affordability, and thus ended up getting a lot in Puna and one in Na'alehu.

When I was in Hilo dining at a low-key sidewalk cafe, I witnessed obvious meth-heads panhandling customers for drug money - and some naively gave them money! The owner said nothing to discourage them; I don't know if he was fearful of retaliation or just didn't grasp that doing nothing would only invite their return and on and on. If he or anybody called the police, would they have come and checked them for drugs and warrants, I think so. They would then be trespassed from the property with the threat of arrest if they returned after the official warning. It's at least doing something. But we were all too busy - and guess who was on that "too busy" list - little old me with all the advice for others! I felt guilty that I didn't make that call. I did though tell the 2 meth-heads to get lost and they did sheepishly. I also made a couple of other calls to the police while there on some other meth-heads I saw congregating suspiciously. I guess I was doing penance!

Anyway, if the good old boy network is as bad as you think it is, it makes me scared. I hope it's not really as bad as it seems, and that's it's just complacency, as that can be worked on more easily. If it's genuine malfeasance or corruption, and they are intentionally turning a blind eye to their own committing serious felonies such as burglary or dealing in stolen property, that's grounds for the federal government to step in. They have done it before when the local police are found to be dirty. The feds love it as it brings them headlines. We used to have those networks in many places, but perseverance eventually broke them down usually. It's not an easy task, but what have any of us got to lose?

The description you gave about how easy it is to burglarize some residences was right on. I'm glad you're not a burglar yourself! Most of these idiots that commit these crimes aren't too bright to begin with. A little diligent police work can really make a dent, I've seen it done when the spotlight is turned on the police. Maybe an investigative reporter could stir up a little action and get the cops to be more effective. Sometimes it's the administration just doing nothing and leaving the status quo. If the rank and file are given a sense of direction and support from above and the community, they know how to do their jobs and will! I know I seem to be thinking like an idealist, but I assure you I have seen this scenerio personnaly - I am a cop! I have worked in Law Enforcement for 28 years. I was a cop in NYC for 10 years and in South Florida for 18 now - all of it in ghettos, out on the street. It's what I was cut out for and I will miss it, but time is catching up with me and now I want some time for me and my family. I speak from experience that something can be done. I've worked under lame-ducks and hotdogs. There is a balance that works that most of can live with. It won't be perfect, but you will see and feel the results if good police work and community policing take hold.

I won't give up hope for Puna and the Big Island, it's too beautiful and unique. I hope you guys with all your knowledge of the local scene, will consider just making some calls sometimes on those meth-heads to start things in the right direction. I will start looking into what I can from here.

Good luck and don't give up the hope - it's your home we're talking about!
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Old 09-21-2007, 05:04 AM
 
Location: Los Feliz
1,749 posts, read 5,916,661 times
Reputation: 726
Most crime in Puna is property crime. I tell newcomers to the island to leave your car doors unlocked and remove all valuables. Locked doors can=smashed windows. Just leave the doors open and they'll lose interest and go away. My losses weren't big in the last 4 years:
1 brand new lawnmower
1 full 5 gallon can of gas
1 brand new weed wacker
Assorted lawn and garden tools

I figured living on the highway and being really visible would deter theft. It was my fault, it shouldn't have been in my garage. This was only one incident. I usually don't lock my vacation home in Milolii Beach Lots. I often leave my keys in my car when I'm there. I usually didn't lock my Kurtistown house either but I had big dogs.

We've always had a joke on the Big Island...you have to make an appointment to get arrested. I think the best way to keep crime down is to look out for each other.
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