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Old 09-12-2012, 11:52 AM
 
Location: North Western NJ
6,591 posts, read 20,798,138 times
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1: sadie said nothing baout there being a problem, 2: GCC can and DO scream...just because its not as frequent as other conures doesnt mean they are "quiet" birds lol...

sadie i completly agree, consitency is certianly key and no spoiling them
i like eclectus but theres somehting about their vocalization pitch that just hurts my ears...

cold, arnt those hawkheads STUNNING...there on my "when im a millionaire" list but im told there not exactly great pets, tending to be more of a hanfull than any other species of parrots a little more tempermental ect...but they are stunnign (and pictures ont even come close to doing them justice...
they join the black palm toos and the greenwing macaws on my When i win the lottery list :P
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Old 09-12-2012, 12:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by foxywench View Post
1: sadie said nothing baout there being a problem, 2: GCC can and DO scream...just because its not as frequent as other conures doesnt mean they are "quiet" birds lol...
They are quiet birds. They are more quiet than parakeets/budgies. How much more quiet can you ask from a parrot?
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Old 09-12-2012, 03:43 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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a linnie or parrotlet is MUCH quieter than A GCC...but if your looking for a "quiet" pet a parrot isnt the way to go...a canary or finch mabe but not a parrot...however it has NOTHING to do with the topic at hand, noone asked about "quiet birds"
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Old 09-12-2012, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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If someone wants a really quiet pet bird, get a finch. Gotta agree with foxywench there.
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Old 09-13-2012, 04:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by sadie123 View Post
I have a female Eclectus. She is very sweet and a good talker. Not nasty a bit. We got her very young. My husband did the training and did get bit a few times until she realized the strength of her beak. It is a lot like training a puppy not to bite. She is now a wonderful addition to our family.

Just like with puppies, it is tempting to play with new babies all the time, but it is really important to not spoil young birds with too much attention since they need to be safely in their cages when you are at work. They need lots of toys and they need to learn to amuse themselves for some hours in the daytime. She is in her cage until 3:00 when I get home and then she is out until bedtime. If they are trained from the beginning to have a regular schedule it is less likely that they will become screamers and feather pluckers later.
It's interesting how some bird owners project human traits like being "spoiled" and the importance of schedules onto parrots, which are genetically wild animals. Maybe these concepts truly do prevent screaming and feather plucking, but I doubt it. I think it really comes down to healthy food and an environment where they feel safe and bonded, and where they receive adequate stimulation. What time of day a parrot "goes to bed" or the steps an owner takes to prevent "spoiling" are irrelevant, I would bed, to the bird's health and well-being, although they probably give the owner a sense of control.
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Old 09-13-2012, 07:59 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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actually birds in nature have strict "scheduals" in terms of edtime ect...
i can tell you from my own experience if jack jack is not "in bed" (covered up) at the right time he starts acting out, screaming cage rattling...same goes for feeding...ect he expects thigns to happen on a set schedual and when things change he doesnt "like" it, and by "like" i mean his temperment changes...hes usually a ver easy going macaw i can do anything to him, hes also usually relitivly quiet...when his schedual gets thrown off he becomes bitey and screamy...not "normal" for him.

the linnies are the same way, they have thier set schedual i can set my watch by them and when things change (ie im in that room late and the lights on later than usual they stat getting ansty, they make more noise, picking on eachother ect, direct symptoms of "stress"

the parrots at the zoo were the same, there was always a HUGE different in their behaviour the day after we had to stay late and the lights were on longer ect.
Light scheuals are very important to birds who would normally wake up and go to sleep with the sun...our unnatural scheduals throw that natural rythm off so we MUST at least put them on a similar schedual for health in my opinion...

In terms of "spoiling" parrots...i have to wonder how many hand raised birds youve lived with?
again, parrots are kings of "schedual" and "ritual" and baby parrots get locked into ritual easier. a baby parrot whos "spoilt" (snuggled all the time, picked up and talked to 24/7, allowed to bite or scream or climb on your shoulder) as a baby EXPECTS those thigns as an adult, they become habit and it becomes increasingly harder to break those habits as adults simply because again, parrots DEMAND schedual and ritual and get stressed easily if their expectations are not met or are changed ect.

now personally i dont see that as a "human trait", in a wild flock a baby parrot would be "disaplined" by its parents and eventually other flock mates, it woud follow the cycle of the sun for wake up and sleep time, ect...

As genetically wild animals i belive its even MORE important to stick as closely to a natural diet, sleep cycle and behavioural pattern as possible in our man made world to keep these highly inteligent animals physically and emotionally healthy.

ill have to see if i can find links to some studies i read a few years back about the difference in health and emotional stability of parrots on a set sleep schedual vs no set schedual. the short and sweet was parrots did better on a set sleep schedual that didnt change through the year, parrots who didnt have a set daily schedual were much easier stressed and more likely to pluck and "problem scream" and ive certainly seen that in person with Jack who was a hand raised baby, and both lokie (hand raised) and cricket (parent raised) plus about 20 other parrots of various kinds in both pet store and zooloical settings.

that being said i am under absolutly NO pretenses that im "in charge" of jack jack...we have a relationship, a mutual bond...but i dont think you can "own" or even control a parrot..its more a partnership...jack jack does what i ask him about 50% of the time, the other 50% of the time its up to me to remember that he CAN do serious damage and when he needs his space he needs his space...and he tells me too...
when he doesnt want to come out of his cage or be touhed he flat out says "back off...bite ya" and i know he knows what those words mean and WILL follow through.
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Old 09-14-2012, 12:49 PM
 
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Interesting comments, Foxywench. I have no doubt that a bird who becomes stressed may act out when it is hungry or tired, and that a bird will also learn what is permitted if it is allowed repeatedly to bite someone. Nothing particularly surprising there. But I think it is unhelpful to project anthropomorphic concepts like "scheduling" and "spoiling" onto wild animals, because it doesn't respect the wild nature of these creatures and suggests that they see things like we do, which they don't. IMHO, many frustrated bird owners' postings about perceived problems derive from the owners having forgotten that their pets are tame but wild animals. Much of the frustration can be dissipated if one keeps in mind the parrot's unique perspective on things, rather than thinking of them as feathered children.
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Old 09-14-2012, 02:00 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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that ican aboslutly agree with...
but i dont see "spoiling" and "schedualing" in the strictly human sense, more in natural daily rythms and "allowed" behaviour...

hen i say schedualling i simply mean proviing consistency for an animal who is "ritualistic" by nature (they simply like things a certain way) and when i say "spoiling" i mean simply not being consistent about expectations and allowing learned but undesireable behaviours simply because the animal is "cute"

parrots do have the intelegence of a small child, but i do agree that it is not fir to such an inteligent creature to expect it to behave in a way that we as humans consider "correct"
i EXPECT jack jack to sream occasinally or bite or be "naughty" ect...because hes a parrot and those are social behaviours he would exhibit naturally and it would be totally detrimental to try to modify those behavioural aspects natural to him simply to suit my own human expectations.
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Old 09-14-2012, 03:35 PM
 
506 posts, read 967,928 times
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Originally Posted by legal_eagle View Post
Interesting comments, Foxywench. I have no doubt that a bird who becomes stressed may act out when it is hungry or tired, and that a bird will also learn what is permitted if it is allowed repeatedly to bite someone. Nothing particularly surprising there. But I think it is unhelpful to project anthropomorphic concepts like "scheduling" and "spoiling" onto wild animals, because it doesn't respect the wild nature of these creatures and suggests that they see things like we do, which they don't. IMHO, many frustrated bird owners' postings about perceived problems derive from the owners having forgotten that their pets are tame but wild animals. Much of the frustration can be dissipated if one keeps in mind the parrot's unique perspective on things, rather than thinking of them as feathered children.
So, are you like saying that they scream not because they miss their owners, but because they are like wild and stuff?
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Old 09-14-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Ocala, FL
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Originally Posted by sunset2000 View Post
So, are you like saying that they scream not because they miss their owners, but because they are like wild and stuff?
"You can take the animal out of the wild but not the wild out of the animal."
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