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Old 10-11-2018, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Birmingham, AL
852 posts, read 543,484 times
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I wonder if/when Hoover will hit 100,000. It certainly isn't growing like it used to be, but growing nonetheless (with plenty of land to develop).

Also, how many cities have a suburb of 100,000??
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Old 10-11-2018, 04:07 PM
 
2,704 posts, read 2,370,735 times
Reputation: 3119
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimCity2000 View Post
I wonder if/when Hoover will hit 100,000. It certainly isn't growing like it used to be, but growing nonetheless (with plenty of land to develop).

Also, how many cities have a suburb of 100,000??
I would imagine Hoover will be well short of 100k at the 2020 census, but reach it by 2030.

As to how many cities have a suburb over 100k, it's not an easy to question to answer... but quite a few.

It kinda depends on what you consider as a suburb. Are San Jose/Oakland suburbs to San Francisco (or vice versa?). Here are the ones I can think of. There are probably others, and probably other 100k+ suburbs from these principal cities, but here's a start:

San Francisco (see above)
Phoenix (Mesa, Glendale, Scottsdale, Chandler, Surprise)
Los Angeles (Long Beach, Anaheim, Glendale, Corona, Riverside/San Bernadino(???))
Dallas (Arlington, Plano, Frisco, Irvine, Richardson, Allen)
Houston (Sugar Land)
Minneapolis (St. Paul)
New York City (Newark NJ, Jersey City NJ, Yonkers, Stamford CT)
San Diego (Chula Vista)
Norfolk (Chesapeake, Hampton, Virginia Beach, Newport News)
Seattle (Tacoma, Bellevue)
Denver (Aurora)
Tampa (Pembroke Pines)
Washington DC (Alexandria, Arlington)
Kansas City (Olathe, Kansas City, KS)
Chicago (Napierville)
Nashville (Murfreesboro)
Austin (Round Rock)
Oklahoma City (Norman)
Atlanta (Sandy Springs)
Tulsa (Broken Arrow)
Miami (a bunch of cities along the I95 corridor)

What I noticed is that there are several cities that have a LOT of *big* suburbs. Denver, Phoenix, Miami, Los Angeles, New York, and a couple others stick out.

Consider that California has 74 cities that top 100k in population. I don't know about you but I can only think of about 5 or 6... definitely less than 10... that I'd consider principal cities in their metro/micro area. So that leaves 60+ 100k+ suburbs

Last edited by steveklein; 10-11-2018 at 04:22 PM..
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Old 10-11-2018, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, California
459 posts, read 341,489 times
Reputation: 411
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveklein View Post
I would imagine Hoover will be well short of 100k at the 2020 census, but reach it by 2030.

As to how many cities have a suburb over 100k, it's not an easy to question to answer... but quite a few.

It kinda depends on what you consider as a suburb. Are San Jose/Oakland suburbs to San Francisco (or vice versa?). Here are the ones I can think of. There are probably others, and probably other 100k+ suburbs from these principal cities, but here's a start:

San Francisco (see above)
Phoenix (Mesa, Glendale, Scottsdale, Chandler, Surprise)
Los Angeles (Long Beach, Anaheim, Glendale, Corona, Riverside/San Bernadino(???))
Dallas (Arlington, Plano, Frisco, Irvine, Richardson, Allen)
Houston (Sugar Land)
Minneapolis (St. Paul)
New York City (Newark NJ, Jersey City NJ, Yonkers, Stamford CT)
San Diego (Chula Vista)
Norfolk (Chesapeake, Hampton, Virginia Beach, Newport News)
Seattle (Tacoma, Bellevue)
Denver (Aurora)
Tampa (Pembroke Pines)
Washington DC (Alexandria, Arlington)
Kansas City (Olathe, Kansas City, KS)
Chicago (Napierville)
Nashville (Murfreesboro)
Austin (Round Rock)
Oklahoma City (Norman)
Atlanta (Sandy Springs)
Tulsa (Broken Arrow)
Miami (a bunch of cities along the I95 corridor)

What I noticed is that there are several cities that have a LOT of *big* suburbs. Denver, Phoenix, Miami, Los Angeles, New York, and a couple others stick out.

Consider that California has 74 cities that top 100k in population. I don't know about you but I can only think of about 5 or 6... definitely less than 10... that I'd consider principal cities in their metro/micro area. So that leaves 60+ 100k+ suburbs
Iíd also like to add Ontario (Los Angeles) which is closing in on 200,000. In fact, I recently moved to a 50,000 house development that is expected to house another 162,000 residents.
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Old 10-12-2018, 08:19 AM
 
267 posts, read 106,872 times
Reputation: 219
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimCity2000 View Post
I wonder if/when Hoover will hit 100,000. It certainly isn't growing like it used to be, but growing nonetheless (with plenty of land to develop).

Also, how many cities have a suburb of 100,000??
There are lots of suburbs already over 100k population. DFW alone has 10+ burbs with 100k+ and every one of them did something like this plan 10 years ago. I think Hoover should shoot higher. Everything I saw in that proposal was underwhelming.

Arlington 365k
Plano 260k
Garland 227k
Irving 216k
Grand Prairie 175k
McKinney 131k
Frisco 117k
Mesquite 140k
Carrollton 119k
Denton 113k

However, perhaps this is a step and maybe in city planning you can't skip steps idk, i just think they should shoot for more than old news. Make people from ATL or Nashville drive through Hoover and say "ohhhh wow look I don't think we have anything like that."
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Old 10-12-2018, 08:33 AM
 
57 posts, read 19,789 times
Reputation: 38
That's an ambitious master plan (and would take hundreds of millions of dollars in private investment to make a reality), but it would be great for the region if they pull it off.
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Old 10-12-2018, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, Birmingham, Charlotte, and Raleigh
2,504 posts, read 1,622,509 times
Reputation: 1519
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfmx1 View Post
There are lots of suburbs already over 100k population. DFW alone has 10+ burbs with 100k+ and every one of them did something like this plan 10 years ago. I think Hoover should shoot higher. Everything I saw in that proposal was underwhelming.

Arlington 365k
Plano 260k
Garland 227k
Irving 216k
Grand Prairie 175k
McKinney 131k
Frisco 117k
Mesquite 140k
Carrollton 119k
Denton 113k

However, perhaps this is a step and maybe in city planning you can't skip steps idk, i just think they should shoot for more than old news. Make people from ATL or Nashville drive through Hoover and say "ohhhh wow look I don't think we have anything like that."
In implementation of any long range plan you cannot skip steps at all. Implementation is about doing things in phases not all overnight. Hoover's plans is quite ambitious for its size and placement in a region. Nobody would care about what Atlanta is doing considering most of their suburban jurisdictions are doing the same thing as Hoover is doing at this very moment.

Also all of the places mentioned with 100K suburbs with metropolitan area populations over 2 million+. Essentially most places that do not have 2 million+ in their region with other cities aside from the principal cities within those metropolitan areas are usually satellite cities or co-principal cities. Similar to the cases of Murphreesboro, TN to Nashville and Cary, NC is to Raleigh.
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Old 10-12-2018, 05:16 PM
 
285 posts, read 126,364 times
Reputation: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by bhamblazer View Post
That's an ambitious master plan (and would take hundreds of millions of dollars in private investment to make a reality), but it would be great for the region if they pull it off.
I agree, looking at this and Birmingham's master plan, I think both cities can have a lot of success implementing their plans and improving quality of life in the metro overall, the success of both will create a synergy and play off of each other nicely. I can definitely see Hoover having improved public transit and a more urbanized business district down the line. Hoover is already the anchor for the suburbs and will make the metro more attractive if they can pull off this plan.
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Old 12-10-2018, 06:06 PM
 
Location: charlotte
307 posts, read 159,820 times
Reputation: 251
I am a bit late to the party on this thread. LRT may or may not be good for B’ ham. But Charlotte (CLT) built its first line 10 years ago and it has been such a success that it has been expanded from 10 miles to 20 miles. CLT wanted to create density along the line. It has done that. More apartments have been built along this line than in any area of the country over last 10 years. The new line just opened last year and there are at least 10 mid rise apartment buildings going up now. When these are finished, 10 more will go up.

In an old warehouse area just south of downtown, the area has been gentrified with thousands of apartments, boutiques, restaurants and many craft breweries. It has been instrumental in creating a very large walkable neighborhood. And there is a rail trail alongside the rail line for walkers and bikers.

This rail line along with the density, the neighboring historic neighborhoods, craft brewery scene, 5 bar districts in and around downtown, expanding downtown and the healthy job market has made CLT the number one city in the US for the relocation of millineals from 2005 to present. This is in actual numbers. Seattle is second. The area is exploding.

For a first hand look come to CLT and check out downtown (called uptown in CLT), And ride the train to check out southend, NODA and other close in neighborhoods.

CLT’s sports venues for football, basketball, hockey and baseball are all downtown and accessible by the train. This coupled with CLT’s dense and compact downtown has made for a good combination. 27k people now live in downtown and southend. Those residents within a short distance of the AAA baseball team has helped the team to lead the minor leagues in attendance for 4 of last 5 years. It is a great venue to see a game.

My point is that CLT made all of this happen with good decision making. It is one thing to build the rail line but it is another to create the density along that line for it to be successful. CLT has several other rail lines planned for the future.

Before these lines were built there were naysayers but those people have been silenced. These lines are not looked at as a solution to traffic problems but instead as an alternative mode of travel. Many people now walk, bike and use transit to work now that would have never used it before. Some people that work and live in southend, downtown or NODA hardly ever use their cars.

It may or may not be for B’ham but it may be worth discussion.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Downtown B'Ham
104 posts, read 48,155 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by The QC View Post
I am a bit late to the party on this thread. LRT may or may not be good for B’ ham. But Charlotte (CLT) built its first line 10 years ago and it has been such a success that it has been expanded from 10 miles to 20 miles. CLT wanted to create density along the line. It has done that. More apartments have been built along this line than in any area of the country over last 10 years. The new line just opened last year and there are at least 10 mid rise apartment buildings going up now. When these are finished, 10 more will go up.

In an old warehouse area just south of downtown, the area has been gentrified with thousands of apartments, boutiques, restaurants and many craft breweries. It has been instrumental in creating a very large walkable neighborhood. And there is a rail trail alongside the rail line for walkers and bikers.

This rail line along with the density, the neighboring historic neighborhoods, craft brewery scene, 5 bar districts in and around downtown, expanding downtown and the healthy job market has made CLT the number one city in the US for the relocation of millineals from 2005 to present. This is in actual numbers. Seattle is second. The area is exploding.

For a first hand look come to CLT and check out downtown (called uptown in CLT), And ride the train to check out southend, NODA and other close in neighborhoods.

CLT’s sports venues for football, basketball, hockey and baseball are all downtown and accessible by the train. This coupled with CLT’s dense and compact downtown has made for a good combination. 27k people now live in downtown and southend. Those residents within a short distance of the AAA baseball team has helped the team to lead the minor leagues in attendance for 4 of last 5 years. It is a great venue to see a game.

My point is that CLT made all of this happen with good decision making. It is one thing to build the rail line but it is another to create the density along that line for it to be successful. CLT has several other rail lines planned for the future.

Before these lines were built there were naysayers but those people have been silenced. These lines are not looked at as a solution to traffic problems but instead as an alternative mode of travel. Many people now walk, bike and use transit to work now that would have never used it before. Some people that work and live in southend, downtown or NODA hardly ever use their cars.

It may or may not be for B’ham but it may be worth discussion.
I have been traveling to CLT on business for the past 15 years and have seen the city rapidly evolve and grow. Birmingham has not shown any desire to evolve into a city with attracting and keeping young people and professionals here. It was the wife and I’s first observation when moving here in 2016 and the foremost reason why we seek to leave here. It’s sad really.

I wouldn’t hold my breath for anything that makes the city have a vibrant or purposeful future. The city and metro simply don’t have it in them.
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Old 12-10-2018, 07:37 PM
 
285 posts, read 126,364 times
Reputation: 140
Quote:
Originally Posted by The QC View Post
I am a bit late to the party on this thread. LRT may or may not be good for Bí ham. But Charlotte (CLT) built its first line 10 years ago and it has been such a success that it has been expanded from 10 miles to 20 miles. CLT wanted to create density along the line. It has done that. More apartments have been built along this line than in any area of the country over last 10 years. The new line just opened last year and there are at least 10 mid rise apartment buildings going up now. When these are finished, 10 more will go up.

In an old warehouse area just south of downtown, the area has been gentrified with thousands of apartments, boutiques, restaurants and many craft breweries. It has been instrumental in creating a very large walkable neighborhood. And there is a rail trail alongside the rail line for walkers and bikers.

This rail line along with the density, the neighboring historic neighborhoods, craft brewery scene, 5 bar districts in and around downtown, expanding downtown and the healthy job market has made CLT the number one city in the US for the relocation of millineals from 2005 to present. This is in actual numbers. Seattle is second. The area is exploding.

For a first hand look come to CLT and check out downtown (called uptown in CLT), And ride the train to check out southend, NODA and other close in neighborhoods.

CLTís sports venues for football, basketball, hockey and baseball are all downtown and accessible by the train. This coupled with CLTís dense and compact downtown has made for a good combination. 27k people now live in downtown and southend. Those residents within a short distance of the AAA baseball team has helped the team to lead the minor leagues in attendance for 4 of last 5 years. It is a great venue to see a game.

My point is that CLT made all of this happen with good decision making. It is one thing to build the rail line but it is another to create the density along that line for it to be successful. CLT has several other rail lines planned for the future.

Before these lines were built there were naysayers but those people have been silenced. These lines are not looked at as a solution to traffic problems but instead as an alternative mode of travel. Many people now walk, bike and use transit to work now that would have never used it before.
Some people that work and live in southend, downtown or NODA hardly ever use their cars.

It may or may not be for Bíham but it may be worth discussion.
Birmingham Bus Rapid Transit Project gaining speed
https://bhamnow.com/2017/11/06/birmi...rapid-transit/

I think that your assessment of B'ham being able to benefit from LRT makes a lot of sense, and Birmingham will do well by making good decisions and executing well as Charlotte has. Currently Birmingham is working on upgrading it's metro transit system and implementing BRT for the 2021 World Games and beyond. It was chosen because it is cheaper than light rail and has brought much of the economic development along it's routes where it was implemented and run efficiently, and Birmingham is badly in need of a faster, more efficient and segregated transit system to be successful in the future. (Cleveland is a great example of this:https://www.freep.com/story/news/loc...-brt/85970434/) My feeling is that if BRT is successful in increasing ridership, becoming a viable and useful transit option, and increases density along the route Birmingham will look into implementing a light rail line at some point. The ultimate goal is to grow density and vibrancy along the routes and I certainly hope BRT and LRT are in Birmingham's future.
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