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Old 11-08-2012, 09:44 PM
 
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Default Question about Summer Weather in Boise

Hello everyone, I'm new to the forums and had a question.

I used to live in Nampa area years back (15 or so), and am considering moving back to the Boise Metro area. I can't for the life of me remember how hot it got in the summertime. My main question is whether it cools down at night time? For instance if it gets to 95-100 degrees during the day, what will it cool down to at night? One thing nice about where I live now, it always will cool to the 60's at night so you can open your windows, and use a whole house fan to cool things down. I am concerned about utility costs out there, having to run the AC all the time during the summer. I would really appreciate any help. On that note, could anybody also chime in on what your average utility costs are in Summer/Winter? Thanks alot!
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Old 11-08-2012, 11:44 PM
 
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Boise during the summer is moderately hot, with low humidity. June/July/August high temps average about 88, but obviously there will be warmer days occasionally. Nightime temps do cool somewhat, with a 60 being normal, much lower than the midwest or south, but can still be uncomfortable at times. AC is advised, but you won't need it everyday.
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:06 AM
 
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Our neighbor runs her AC 24/7 as soon as the temps hit 65-70. This past summer we had, what, 20-30 days of at or near triple digits. The majority of those nights it cooled in to the high 60s/low 70s and there was no breeze. So in our experience, no, there are times when it doesn't cool down enough to really feel like it's cooler. We have a 15 year old 2 story house and the ventilation system and AC cannot comfortabley cool the updownstairs and level out the temps through the house when it gets into triple digits. I don't think it's quite an issue with single story homes. Newer homes may be different as well. IMHO to some extent, it's related to your personal level of comfort, the house itself. Additionally when we moved here a little over 20 years ago, it didn't get into the 100s for the first several years.
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Old 11-09-2012, 01:59 PM
 
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I'm thinking a single story home with a basement would be ideal. That way we can hide out downstairs to keep cool in the summer! Maybe a whole house fan would help on some days then if it cools below 70 at night. Thanks for the replies. I appreciate it!
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Old 11-16-2012, 11:20 AM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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Ya gotta remember that, geographically speaking, Boise is in the "high desert" region of the interior pacific northwest. Ergo, it can--and does--get blistering hot here during the summers. And with the whole Global Warming thing going on, which for some reason seems to have affected the Treasure Valley area particularly hard, rest assured you can be in for some sweltering days here during the summer months, with only a slight cooldown at night.
I moved here from Austin, TX, which is about as hot as you can get in the U.S. during summer, and even I was suprised at how hot Boise summmers are. To me, it's one of thw two downsides of Boise weather: Spring and Fall are gorgeous, but Winters can be gray and bleak and have inversions which are stinky and depressing, and Summers can be blistering.
With the GLobal Warming, it is now much hotter here in Summer than it was when you lived in Nampa 15 years ago.
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Old 11-16-2012, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Boise, ID
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I haven't pulled any numbers to substantiate this, but it certainly feels like the average summer daytime high is much higher than 88 in recent years. Maybe if you take the last few decades and average them, that is true, but in the last 10 years, I would guess our average summer high was in the mid 90s. Recent summers have been much hotter than they were when I was a child in Boise. Lately, we typically have at least a week (sometimes much more) that it gets to over 100.

But as they say "it's a dry heat", which really does make a difference. I'd take 100 in Boise Idaho over 85 in Florida any day of the week.

It does get reasonably cool at night most of the time. Our summers are pretty clear skies most of the time, and that allows the daytime heat to dissipate pretty well. If it is cloudy, that traps the heat in, but most summer days are clear.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lacerta View Post
I haven't pulled any numbers to substantiate this, but it certainly feels like the average summer daytime high is much higher than 88 in recent years. Maybe if you take the last few decades and average them, that is true, but in the last 10 years, I would guess our average summer high was in the mid 90s. Recent summers have been much hotter than they were when I was a child in Boise. Lately, we typically have at least a week (sometimes much more) that it gets to over 100.

But as they say "it's a dry heat", which really does make a difference. I'd take 100 in Boise Idaho over 85 in Florida any day of the week.

It does get reasonably cool at night most of the time. Our summers are pretty clear skies most of the time, and that allows the daytime heat to dissipate pretty well. If it is cloudy, that traps the heat in, but most summer days are clear.
I hear you on that. I don't think the average has popped up to the mid-90's in recent years, but just a couple of hot years can give that perception.

Agree with the humidity thing. Jokes aside, a dry heat is much more pleasant than Tampa in mid-August at the same temp.
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Old 11-17-2012, 10:06 PM
 
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I do remember it being hot in Boise, but not over 100 so much. I lived in Oklahoma for a few years and the humidity was so bad we didn't even bother buying any outdoor patio furniture, since we couldn't stand to be outside. Sounds like Boise is at least dry.
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