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Old 02-05-2013, 01:26 PM
 
674 posts, read 1,251,523 times
Reputation: 531

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This article pretty much says it all:

Idaho's wages have stagnated for three decades. Here's why. | Business Insider features | Idahostatesman.com

Quote:
In 1977, Idaho’s average wage was 88 percent of the national average.

Then, in the 1980s, the decline started. According to the Idaho Department of Labor, the state’s average fell to 76 percent of the national average by 2010.

Today, despite decades of economic development efforts, Idahoans’ wages regularly show up near — or at — the bottom of 50-state wage rankings...

Today’s median annual salary — the point at which half the people make more and half less — in Idaho is $23,192 for all full- and part-time workers. That’s dead last in the country, according to a U.S. Census report.

The Great Recession hit Idaho harder than most states. Based on median hourly wages, Idaho slipped from 34th to 42nd between 2008 to 2011, the steepest decline of any state, the state Labor Department says. The hourly median wage climbed slightly from $14.32 in 2008 to $14.54 in 2010 before dropping to $14.51 in 2011.

Between 2008 and 2011, median hourly wages climbed 1.3 percent, and inflation increased 4 percent.

Idaho’s median household income dropped 9 percent from 2008 to $43,341 in 2011 — the 10th lowest in the country.
Article also talks about the reasons why, the cost of living factored in, and hope for the future.

Pretty bleak stuff.
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Old 02-05-2013, 07:22 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 6,763,668 times
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As much as I loved living in Boise I'm making almost 30% more plus have better benefits by moving to Phoenix. But then again think about how crowded Boise would be if people could find jobs.
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:24 AM
 
129 posts, read 316,183 times
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Low cost of living areas almost always equal low wages overall. High cost of living areas equal higher wages. That's just the simple but ugly truth. On a positive, Idaho was ranked #9 for being a small business state. Many people simply create their own destiny here due to the low wages. I have seen so many folks open a carpet cleaning, home cleaning, plumbing, etc type of company and start making really good money within a short amount of time. Sometimes, you just have to think outside of the box and make it happen!
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Old 02-06-2013, 01:33 PM
 
674 posts, read 1,251,523 times
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Low cost areas do correlate with low wages, but the article states this isn't a significant factor in explaining Idaho's low wages. A lot of the comments to the article seem to think the drop in wage inflation correlates with Idaho kicking unions out / the start of Right to Work, but I'm not sure that's the case either.

I'm just floored that the median salary here is $23,192. 50% of wage earners make less than 23k. Insane.
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Old 02-06-2013, 06:10 PM
 
129 posts, read 316,183 times
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I think when it comes to articles like this, they should explain by regions. Most of Idaho is made up of little towns with little or no work. I would like to see what areas like Boise or Twin Falls calculates at? I bet much higher than the state average.
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Old 02-08-2013, 08:41 AM
 
265 posts, read 616,423 times
Reputation: 210
Quote:
Originally Posted by grmi66 View Post
As much as I loved living in Boise I'm making almost 30% more plus have better benefits by moving to Phoenix. But then again think about how crowded Boise would be if people could find jobs.
Funny, transplants from Calif.,would always be complaining on making less, with fewer benifits, after moving to Phoenix. But then again think how much more crowded Phoenix would be if people didn't have to put up with 5 months of above 100° temps.
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Old 02-08-2013, 12:22 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 6,763,668 times
Reputation: 3518
I would still rather live in Boise and make a little less money. But a $20,000+ a year bump in income plus benefits that very few companies in Idaho could match lured me away. So I will just sock away as much as I can and hope to return to Boise when I get close to retiring.
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Old 02-11-2013, 02:29 PM
 
33 posts, read 67,815 times
Reputation: 17
When I have looked at the jobs there at the hospital their CNAs start out making more than they do where I live and I am in Wisconsin between milwaukee and Chicago. I started at 10.43 (with experience) otherwise they would have started me at 10. And looking there it looks like they start out over $11. I guess it just depends on what type of work you do.
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Rocky Mountain Xplorer
956 posts, read 1,291,733 times
Reputation: 689
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homeinspectorboise View Post
I think when it comes to articles like this, they should explain by regions. Most of Idaho is made up of little towns with little or no work. I would like to see what areas like Boise or Twin Falls calculates at? I bet much higher than the state average.
Definitely. I would think comparing Boise metro to the rest of the state is totally a case of apples and oranges as there's large swaths of affluence, certainly in Boise proper, though I guess high-tech has been hit hard with the employment cutbacks at large local employers like HP & Micron. But going Right-to-work will greatly benefit the state over the longer term.
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Old 02-11-2013, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Mountain Home, ID
1,955 posts, read 2,999,840 times
Reputation: 2411
The state went Right-to-Work in 1986. You'd think we would have noticed some of those benefits in over 25 years.
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