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Old 07-24-2010, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Colorado (PA at heart)
5,230 posts, read 6,265,306 times
Reputation: 6045
Quote:
Originally Posted by brubaker View Post
I guess I just don't see any advantage. It's more fragile than a book. It costs more. You still have to pay for the books to view on the thing. It's attractive to thieves. It cost hundreds of dollars. Until I see one, I refuse to believe it's easier on the eyes than a physical book. It cost electricity to run. And on and on and on. There's no permanency to it. There's no guarantee that I'll be able to pick it up and read it 20 years from now on a backwoods camping expedition. And it costs more.

There's just no advantage to the thing. It's like they've reinvented the wheel. We already have books? Why am I gonna pay $200+ dollars to do the same thing through some fragile, cumbersome, electric gadget? It sounds, like most new doo dads everyone's clamoring to buy, like another sinkhole to throw my precious time into... maintainng and fiddling with it trying to get it to work. I already have my sluggy, buggy computer to do that for me. Why add something else?
Most of your points are valid but to say there are NO advantages isn't fair. There are many advantages already mentioned in this topic that you are simply choosing to ignore. Also, e-readers are not cumbersome. Most are lighter weight than many paperbacks (definitely lighter than a hardback), plus they are thinner and don't require being held open which I find cumbersome (in fact, I used to get cramps in my hands from holding a paperback open too long). Also, you have never used one so you can't comment on it's functionality or ease of use. Convenient that you refuse to believe it's easy on the eyes until you see it since you will probably never see it.
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Old 07-24-2010, 08:59 AM
 
176 posts, read 177,010 times
Reputation: 282
Now where did I leave my stone tablet copy of Clan of the Cave Bear?

Oh, I remember. It is under Stephen Kings, Under The Dome scrolls.
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Old 07-24-2010, 09:00 AM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley
4,095 posts, read 7,843,945 times
Reputation: 3257
Quote:
Originally Posted by brubaker View Post
I guess I just don't see any advantage. It's more fragile than a book. It costs more. You still have to pay for the books to view on the thing. It's attractive to thieves. It cost hundreds of dollars. Until I see one, I refuse to believe it's easier on the eyes than a physical book. It cost electricity to run. And on and on and on. There's no permanency to it. There's no guarantee that I'll be able to pick it up and read it 20 years from now on a backwoods camping expedition. And it costs more.

There's just no advantage to the thing. It's like they've reinvented the wheel. We already have books? Why am I gonna pay $200+ dollars to do the same thing through some fragile, cumbersome, electric gadget? It sounds, like most new doo dads everyone's clamoring to buy, like another sinkhole to throw my precious time into... maintainng and fiddling with it trying to get it to work. I already have my sluggy, buggy computer to do that for me. Why add something else?
You clearly don't want one, and that's fine. But, as I described it, it's neither heavy, fragile nor cumbersome (the iPad is, the Kindle is not). In my case, I'm a very heavy reader, and I don't have the space to keep everything I read - I already have bookshelves in every room of the house and a larger house isn't an option. Some books I like well enough that I buy them for my "permanent" library, usually used from one of Amazon's secondary sellers.

The Kindle stays charged for about a week on one charge (less if you leave the wireless turned on, which is only necessary when downloading a book). You can see them at a Target (either now or very shortly in the future). The Sony version is available at several stores. Barnes and Noble has a version you can see in-store.

As I mentioned, the ability to change font sizes is incredibly helpful to me. If you've ever looked at the selection of large print books, it's frankly pitiful. I'm not at the large-print-only point yet, but I know it's coming and I'm glad I have options. I also live in a rural area without a lot of access to bookstores (our very small library is part of an inter-library loan, but it can take many months to get books in, and if I can't browse the books, how do I know what I want to order?). With the Kindle I can download a sample (usually a full chapter) before I buy.

The down side of a Kindle is the inability to share books with other people outside of your Kindle network, the inability to sell books back (although I usually just donated mine), the relatively small number of books available compared to what has ever been published (Amazon claims 650,000 books available currently). In general, if it's recently been published, is enduringly popular or is out-of-copyright, it's on Kindle. Price wasn't as much of an issue (books at Amazon were generally between $0.99-$5.99 for back catalog, $9.99 for brand new stuff), but when Apple introduced the iPad, the made some deals with publishers and now a couple (Hatchett and Penguin) are charging hardback prices for just-released ebooks, which I refuse to pay. Given my backlog of books, waiting a year or so for the price to come down isn't an issue. There are also a couple of authors who won't allow their books to be published in any electronic format, mostly out of piracy concerns.

Most the entire "fiddling" I do with the Kindle is downloading: go to the Amazon web site, find the book, buy the Kindle version, turn on the wireless on the Kindle, click on Menu then click on Check and Sync and within about 30 seconds the book is downloaded. Books from other sources require downloading it to my computer, connecting the Kindle via USB to my computer and copying it over. I also have to do file maintenance because I have more books than the device will hold. Absolute favorites just stay on the device. Things I might want to read again get backed up (either on Amazon's servers or on my computer). Other things I just delete off my device.

As far as cost - the Kindle is my TV/cable. I can do without TV, but I can't do without books.
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Old 07-24-2010, 01:00 PM
 
1,992 posts, read 2,588,940 times
Reputation: 1695
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozgal View Post
anti e-book here.

I love gadgets and all that, however you can not compare to a real book.
I am on a computer all day so reading a book is for me, easier on my eyes.

Plus, I couldn't imagine my home without a bookcase full of books.

Exactly the same here. Nothing like smelling a book and touching its pages.

I love gadgets so I'm not saying that I'll never buy one, but right now I'm not traveling a lot to be worried about volume or weight.

Last edited by DFWgal; 07-24-2010 at 01:14 PM..
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Old 07-24-2010, 02:14 PM
 
Location: OUTTA SIGHT!
3,025 posts, read 1,190,440 times
Reputation: 1899
Who needs to carry around their entire library anyways?
Geez, pick a book and commit.

Isn't that the beauty of being a reader of books versus the internet?
The ability to focus for longer periods of time?

I'm sure it has some benefits to some people.
Vive la différence! But, newspapers are already closing and scaling back on a massive level
... I certainly don't want the same thing happening to book publishers.

If it hasn't already.

But whatever. Buy...don't buy. It doesn't matter to me really.

Last edited by brubaker; 07-24-2010 at 02:26 PM.. Reason: 'vive la différence' not 'viva la difference'
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Old 07-24-2010, 02:16 PM
 
5,004 posts, read 5,066,815 times
Reputation: 5629
I'm happy to use a computer, a cellphone or a laptop.

However, I prefer to read books, rather than a Kindle. I'll only purchase one when I'm forced to.
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Old 07-24-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: OUTTA SIGHT!
3,025 posts, read 1,190,440 times
Reputation: 1899
I never use a computer.
Those things are evil and I'll be damned if you'll ever get me in front of one!

But seriously, I wish I had a Stephen King scroll.
How cool would that be?
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,597 posts, read 7,332,185 times
Reputation: 9030
Default E-Books sales soared this year

Much to my chagrin, the sales of e-books rose 207% the first five months of this year alone. This, according to the August 2, 2010, issue of TIME Magazine. Amazon sells more books for its Kindle e-reader than it does hardcover volumes.

Somebody -- a whole lot of somebodies! -- likes e-books.

The article also addressed the issue of the 'bestsellers list,' as in what constitutes a bestseller now -- a book in print, or an e-book, and whether there needs to be two lists now. Found that interesting too.
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:33 PM
 
10,818 posts, read 5,606,236 times
Reputation: 14683
i read an interesting article over the weekend on this topic, in favour of the e-book for the added connectivity to the story that the reader can have.

It had some valid points, in regards to teaching & keeping kids interested in learning, there was an example of Alice In Wonderland on the ipad where you can make the characters move & change etc....

I'll never say never, but not at the moment...
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
2,638 posts, read 5,792,727 times
Reputation: 3317
Quote:
Who needs to carry around their entire library anyways?
Geez, pick a book and commit.
I often read multiple books at once. I have one in the bathroom, one in my car, one (sometimes more) in the living room, one on my nightstand. Some books I only read when I am in a certain mood. I especially love really long books, and they are HEAVY and cumbersome to carry around. Some books I have had to buy multiple physical copies because I re-read certain titles so much that I wear my original copies out. The ones I leave in my car also get worn out extra quickly because they are exposed to heat, humidity, and UV. I love having a selection of books with me all the time on my e-reader. I can keep my real books inside, safe from light and heat and humidity, and I can carry around multiple titles with no weight or bulk when I am out and about.
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