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Old 10-20-2010, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,667 posts, read 3,930,843 times
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I'm trying to become a more well rounded individual. I think I could start that by turning off the television and picking up some books. Anyway, here are a few that I've read in school.

  • The Outsiders
  • To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The Scarlet Letter
  • The Great Gatsby
  • The Grapes of Wrath
Any other suggestions of some great works would be appreciated.
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Old 10-20-2010, 03:18 PM
 
Location: Matthews, NC
14,699 posts, read 13,910,429 times
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1984
Animal Farm
Brave New World
Anything by Shakespeare, if only to realize how similar stories are even to this day.
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Old 10-20-2010, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
1,297 posts, read 1,721,967 times
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These are my favorites: Catcher in the Rye, Brave New World, The Bell Jar, Slaughterhouse Five, A Farewell to Arms, Frankenstein, Hiroshima, A Separate Peace
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Old 10-20-2010, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,516 posts, read 16,190,800 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philosophizer View Post
I'm trying to become a more well rounded individual. I think I could start that by turning off the television and picking up some books. Anyway, here are a few that I've read in school.

  • The Outsiders
  • To Kill A Mockingbird
  • The Scarlet Letter
  • The Great Gatsby
  • The Grapes of Wrath
Any other suggestions of some great works would be appreciated.

many publishing houses have series of classic literature.

You should check out Harvard Classics
Franklin Library 100 greatest
Easton Press 100 greatest

The last two sets are kinda pricey, but if you intend to keep them on your shelf, they look really pretty:

http://images.craigslist.org/3na3mf3l25Y45T05W6a8a4a88130238af1834.jpg (broken link)



here is the list from Franklyn Library:

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Old 10-20-2010, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,516 posts, read 16,190,800 times
Reputation: 7263
Here is the List from Easton press:
  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  • Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Conan Doyle
  • The Aeneid by Virgil
  • Aesop's Fables by Aesop
  • Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  • The Analects of Confucius by Confucius
  • Animal Farm by George Orwell
  • Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • Beowulf by Anonymous
  • Billy Budd by Herman Melville
  • Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • Robert Browning - Collected Poems by Robert Browning
  • Candide by Voltaire
  • The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
  • The Cherry Orchard/The Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov
  • The Confessions of St. Augustine by Saint Augustine of Hippo
  • The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, père
  • Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  • Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand
  • David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  • The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio
  • Emily Dickinson - Collected Poems by Emily Dickinson
  • The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri
  • Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
  • Dracula by Bram Stoker
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Essays by Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
  • Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev
  • Faust by Johann Wolfgang-Von- Goethe
  • Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton,-James- Madison,-John Jay
  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • Robert Frost - Collected Poems by Robert Frost
  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  • Grimm's Fairy Tales by Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm,- the-Brothers-Grimm
  • Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  • History of Early Rome by Livy
  • The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
  • Iliad by Homer
  • Ivanhoe by Walter Scott
  • Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
  • The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
  • John Keats - Collected Poems by John Keats
  • Lady Chatterley's Lover by D. H. Lawrence
  • The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
  • Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
  • The Legend of Sleepy Hollow & Other Stories by Washington Irving
  • Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
  • Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  • Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
  • Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  • A Midsummer Night's Dream by William Shakespeare
  • Moby-Dick or, The Whale by Herman Melville
  • The Necklace and Other Tales by Guy de Maupassant
  • Odyssey by Homer
  • Oedipus the King by Sophocles
  • Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  • On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin
  • Paradise Lost by John Milton
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  • The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan
  • Politics by Aristotle
  • The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James
  • A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • The Prince by Niccolò Machiavelli
  • Pygmalion/Candida by George Bernard Shaw
  • The Red and the Black by Stendhal
  • The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
  • The Republic by Plato
  • Rights of Man by Thomas Paine
  • Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
  • Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare
  • Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam by Omar Khayyam
  • The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The Sea Wolf by Jack London
  • She Stoops to Conquer by Oliver Goldsmith
  • Silas Marner by George Eliot
  • The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner
  • A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  • Tales from the Arabian Nights by Richard Burton
  • Tales of Mystery and Imagination by Edgar Allan Poe
  • The Talisman by Walter Scott
  • Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  • The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas, père
  • The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  • Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
  • Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  • Walden by Henry David Thoreau
  • War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  • The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler
  • Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
  • William Butler Yeats - Collected Poems by W. B. Yeats
I have only read about half of these titles, but the Franklyn/Easton books look great on my Shelf


The Harvard Classics are much cheaper. you can find them for less than 5 bucks each on ebay. International collectors library is another one of the cheap sets with good titles
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Old 10-20-2010, 05:00 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,431,888 times
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Bleak House & Middlemarch
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Old 10-20-2010, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,657 posts, read 2,660,765 times
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I applaud the long list of books that HtownLove posted.

However, as the opinion of just myself, some of those books require the reader to bring an appreciation, or at least some education / instructional background, to the full enjoyment of those books. For example Dicken's works helps to know about the social structure and cultural context of English society at the time Dicken's was writing his novels. Same with James Fenimore Cooper, it helps to understand the broad cultural implications of the Emerging country from the British Colonial period and the social structure of the colonist came from.

Just to read some of these books, without preparation which would lead to understanding the context in which the author wrote his book, could result in just mental noise; the reader will only absorb the plot and the description of the characters (and actions) at the top level of the book. The reader might be unable to delve into the depths of the underlying themes and truths of human nature that can be gleaned.

It is only recently in human history that people other that the aristocracy and the higher levels of the middle class were both literate and had inexpensive printing of books available to them. Working people and farm laborers did not have the luxury of reading books, and if they did read, it most likely was limited to religious material IMHO. I am only repeating what we all already know from history books. Obvious example, Scarlet Letter, a 20-something today would have no comprehension as to why a woman is ostracized for have sex outside of marriage, just watch TV sometime. How could one understand ostracizing a woman for having sex without understanding Puritan culture and society structure?

Sorry for the rant. It just seems that one or two of these books on the above lists really need college level Lit courses to get the reader's head around the context, appreciation of the details, and the sub-text of the cultural unwritten (in the book) social codes the characters in the novels exist in.

My rant aside, the books on those lists are still great books.

Phil
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Old 10-20-2010, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Texas
4,667 posts, read 3,930,843 times
Reputation: 4987
I was always tempted the read The Catcher in the Rye, but the subject matter seemed a little too weird for me. That is a great list that got posted though by Htown. There are quite a few title I recognize, and quite a few of them that I've read and forgot to list. Off to the library tomorrow.
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Old 10-20-2010, 07:45 PM
 
11,355 posts, read 6,001,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Philosophizer View Post
I was always tempted the read The Catcher in the Rye, but the subject matter seemed a little too weird for me. That is a great list that got posted though by Htown. There are quite a few title I recognize, and quite a few of them that I've read and forgot to list. Off to the library tomorrow.
it is a great book, I highly recommend it
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Old 10-20-2010, 07:57 PM
 
5,148 posts, read 1,777,205 times
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Here's the ones, I would label must read, out of my library:
Communist Manifesto
Art of War
The Prince
Common Sense
Civil Disobedience
The Curious Case of the Dog in the Nightime (instant classic)
The Simulacra
Farenheit 451
Atlas Shrugged
1984/Animal Farm
Grapes of Wrath/Of Mice and Men
THe Hobbit
Harry Potters (I said it)
The HitchHikers Guide to the Galaxy series

Add:
Sherlock Holmes and Edgar Allen Poe

Only adults right? No Spots First Picnic, Light in the Attic, or Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark?
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