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Old 09-15-2007, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Glasgow,Scotland
150 posts, read 254,080 times
Reputation: 60
A Child called 'It' by Dave Pelzer

Read this book in six hours non-stop
Gave it to my co-workers, some were in tears -powerful stuff
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Old 09-15-2007, 06:02 PM
 
4,386 posts, read 9,574,349 times
Reputation: 3578
WOW,everyone on the previous posts reads my books--Abraham,Wayne Dyer,Maxwell Maltz,Castaneda,Emmit Fox,Coehlo,Neal Diamond Walsh,Lord of the Flies,,,I am amazed,thats my library
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Old 09-16-2007, 04:22 AM
 
137 posts, read 567,756 times
Reputation: 109
"From Strength to Strength" by Sara Henderson
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Old 09-16-2007, 08:06 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,429 posts, read 10,520,930 times
Reputation: 8213
Default Great taste!

Let's face nanannie, you got great taste in the books you read!

blessings...Franco
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Old 09-17-2007, 02:34 PM
Status: "Chin up things can only get better" (set 11 days ago)
 
Location: South Bay Native
9,638 posts, read 12,832,883 times
Reputation: 13457
Quote:
Originally Posted by cahpsuth View Post
A Child called 'It' by Dave Pelzer

Read this book in six hours non-stop
Gave it to my co-workers, some were in tears -powerful stuff
I read that one too - great book. I read it on the heels of reading White Oleander. I wish I had more time to read nowadays
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Old 12-05-2007, 12:01 PM
 
382 posts, read 443,476 times
Reputation: 140
Anything written by Ayn Rand had a great impact upon me as a younger reader.
Today, I have to agree with some of the others that The Law of Attraction by Esther Hicks and the Power of Intention by Wayne Dyer have me captivated.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Atlanta Metro
20 posts, read 27,543 times
Reputation: 30
Chasing Daylight - How My Forthcoming Death Transformed My Life by Eugene O'Kelly is an amazing book. He was the CEO of KPMG and was diagnosed with brain cancer. He died only three and a half months after his diagnosis. Even though the book is filled with sadness, it is also filled with the reminder that life is very precious and never take anything or anyone for granted. It is truly inspirational, and I feel that everyone could learn a lot from this touching book written by a truly amazing man.
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Old 12-07-2007, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Piedmont NC
4,597 posts, read 7,144,399 times
Reputation: 9027
Don't know if it changed my life exactly, but it sure gave me the will to go on -- Follow the River, the account of Mary Ingalls, who along with her sister-in-law was kidnapped by Native Americans. To get home, she follows the Ohio River back to West Virginia. Incredible account of a strong woman's will to survive, contrasted superbly against the whiny, petulant sister-in-law. Great read for a Book Club, especially around Thanksgiving.
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Old 12-08-2007, 12:56 PM
 
Location: The mountians of Northern California.
1,357 posts, read 3,882,146 times
Reputation: 1086
About a year after my daughter was diagnosed with classic autism and developmental delays I was a wreck. I read a book called Children with Autism, A Parents Guide. The book has a chapter about grieving. I recognized myself in those grieving steps. I know it sounds really odd, but I was grieving and didn't know it. That book helped snap me out of the funk I had been in. Now when I meet other parents of autistic kids who I can see going through those phases, I let them borrow my book or tell them where to find it. That initial year after the diagnosis, was very hard. The doctors told us our little girl would never do many things. They said she would never fully talk and communicate with us, never mainstream into school, never live away from us, never have friends, never have a job, never find a mate, never never never was what we were told. The book may not touch everyone dealing with autism, but it was what I needed to get back to my old self.
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Old 12-08-2007, 07:36 PM
 
2,932 posts, read 3,118,706 times
Reputation: 2705
sierras, I don't think its odd at all that you didn't know you were grieving. I think a lot of people don't know when they are grieving, and to what extent. I'm glad you found a book that helped you. I hope your precious daughter and you are doing well.
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