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Old 07-12-2013, 10:48 PM
 
502 posts, read 332,250 times
Reputation: 770
Death and Dying in Central Appalachia by James Crissman who is a professor of sociology. The book talks about how people handled the whole dying process back then compared to now. I know it sounds macabre lol, but it's actually a very interesting book. I'm really into Appalachian culture type of books because I love the region. I have traveled through the mountains of Eastern Kentucky many times and remembered seeing family graveyards in people's backyards and was fascinated by the practice. So, I went searching for a book at my local library on the customs of the dying process in the Appalachian region and found this jewel of a book.
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Texas
11,859 posts, read 6,839,667 times
Reputation: 49781
Quote:
Originally Posted by KiwiKate View Post
Have we talked about "Little Bee" by Chris Cleave? A very beautifully written story about a young Nigerian girl and an Englishwoman whose lives connect in Nigeria and then again in England. Love it!
I have that book on a bookshelf and had completely forgotten about it until you mentioned it. I will read it and thanks for the recommendation, KK.
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
4,644 posts, read 4,431,078 times
Reputation: 2556
Quote:
Originally Posted by hodgemo2 View Post
I'm not usually a fantasy person either, but I have LOTR in my book pile as well. Maybe after SoIaF. I've had a love/hate relationship so far while reading A Game of Thrones. It is SO slow going a lot of the time, but I really want to know what happens. So far A Clash of Kings is moving along nicely.
Martin spends too much time describing food And clothing. How many times do you have to be told the King's Guard cloaks are white. I skip those references because they don 't advance the plot.
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:46 PM
 
Location: An hour from NYC*wheep*
312 posts, read 245,251 times
Reputation: 272
Altough I'm not into Young Adult fiction books, I did just finish The Maze Runner and it was much better than I expected. It wouldn't insult teens who read this book or sugar coat anything in it. It's very thrilling, interesting, and full of action. If you liked the Hunger Games or any similar teen dystopia novel, you will like this book.
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Old 07-13-2013, 05:16 AM
 
529 posts, read 547,255 times
Reputation: 505
Quote:
Originally Posted by football45013 View Post
Death and Dying in Central Appalachia by James Crissman who is a professor of sociology. The book talks about how people handled the whole dying process back then compared to now. I know it sounds macabre lol, but it's actually a very interesting book. I'm really into Appalachian culture type of books because I love the region. I have traveled through the mountains of Eastern Kentucky many times and remembered seeing family graveyards in people's backyards and was fascinated by the practice. So, I went searching for a book at my local library on the customs of the dying process in the Appalachian region and found this jewel of a book.
This looks very interesting and is certainly not a run of the mill suggestion. thank you for sharing it. this is when I really appreicate the forum- I most certainly would not stumble on this book without this forum. (here's hoping I can get it at the library)
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Old 07-13-2013, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Kenmore, WA
6,775 posts, read 3,159,140 times
Reputation: 9425
Quote:
Originally Posted by KiwiKate View Post
Have we talked about "Little Bee" by Chris Cleave? A very beautifully written story about a young Nigerian girl and an Englishwoman whose lives connect in Nigeria and then again in England. Love it!
Thank you! My library has it on audio.

Quote:
Originally Posted by football45013 View Post
Death and Dying in Central Appalachia by James Crissman who is a professor of sociology. The book talks about how people handled the whole dying process back then compared to now. I know it sounds macabre lol, but it's actually a very interesting book. I'm really into Appalachian culture type of books because I love the region. I have traveled through the mountains of Eastern Kentucky many times and remembered seeing family graveyards in people's backyards and was fascinated by the practice. So, I went searching for a book at my local library on the customs of the dying process in the Appalachian region and found this jewel of a book.
Sadly, my library doesn't have this one in any form -- but Amazon did! My "one-click" has it on it's way to me from PA, and when I finish it my library will have a copy, too!

I am still plodding my way through both books started awhile ago: "The Living" and "Behind the Beautiful Forevers." They are both very well done, but this summer doesn't seem to be my time to listen to or read a book for any lengthy time. I seem to be dabbling in this and that and "oh, what is that over there?"
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Old 07-13-2013, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Texas
11,859 posts, read 6,839,667 times
Reputation: 49781
Quote:
Originally Posted by football45013 View Post
Death and Dying in Central Appalachia by James Crissman who is a professor of sociology. The book talks about how people handled the whole dying process back then compared to now. I know it sounds macabre lol, but it's actually a very interesting book. I'm really into Appalachian culture type of books because I love the region. I have traveled through the mountains of Eastern Kentucky many times and remembered seeing family graveyards in people's backyards and was fascinated by the practice. So, I went searching for a book at my local library on the customs of the dying process in the Appalachian region and found this jewel of a book.
Oh....this book sounds so interesting. I have a minor in soci and this is right up my alley. Thanks for mentioning it.
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Old 07-13-2013, 01:54 PM
 
13,974 posts, read 11,358,177 times
Reputation: 5189
I am now reading "Wild Grass Three Stories Of Change in Modern China" by Ian Johnson. It gives one a view of modern China using the stories of 3 individuals.
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Old 07-13-2013, 03:49 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
2,231 posts, read 1,794,784 times
Reputation: 4369
Finally I've managed to read something that I think is worth sharing with the readers of this forum. I've done tons of reading lately but almost all of it has been escapist fiction - most everything by Robert Crais, a few things by Greg Iles and a couple of others but....

I've just finished Still Alice by Lisa Genova. It is the story of a 51 year old woman who is a Harvard professor of psychology and her gradual decent into early onset Alzheimer's. I strongly recommend it. One of her first episodes occurs in Harvard Square when she is lost and can not find her way home which is just several blocks and a route that she has walked for 25 years.

Over the past few years I have had 3 episodes of forgetfulness that were unlike any ordinary forgetting that we all experience and after the fact they were very scary to me. I can only say that it was like some black hole opened up and the particular piece of knowledge/information was simply not accessible and yet I knew that I should have had no trouble recalling it.

I've got several other books in the to be read stack but find I can not just jump into something else yet.
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Old 07-13-2013, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Texas
11,859 posts, read 6,839,667 times
Reputation: 49781
Quote:
Originally Posted by zugor View Post
Finally I've managed to read something that I think is worth sharing with the readers of this forum. I've done tons of reading lately but almost all of it has been escapist fiction - most everything by Robert Crais, a few things by Greg Iles and a couple of others but....

I've just finished Still Alice by Lisa Genova. It is the story of a 51 year old woman who is a Harvard professor of psychology and her gradual decent into early onset Alzheimer's. I strongly recommend it. One of her first episodes occurs in Harvard Square when she is lost and can not find her way home which is just several blocks and a route that she has walked for 25 years.

Over the past few years I have had 3 episodes of forgetfulness that were unlike any ordinary forgetting that we all experience and after the fact they were very scary to me. I can only say that it was like some black hole opened up and the particular piece of knowledge/information was simply not accessible and yet I knew that I should have had no trouble recalling it.

I've got several other books in the to be read stack but find I can not just jump into something else yet.
That is one of the best books I have ever read. I've read it three times. It was recommended here in the forum and then I recommended it to everyone. I also gave a copy of it to the director of the ALF (assisted living facility) where my mother is. I think everyone should read it but particularly those who are dealing with a family member or friend who has Alzheimer's.

In the book the reader views Alzheimer's from the patient's perspective. We all need that so that we won't get upset with our loved ones when they keep forgetting things and repeating themselves over and over. The author really did her homework for this novel. I am very impressed with both the book and the author.
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