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Old 06-30-2011, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Texas
28,177 posts, read 24,286,762 times
Reputation: 33844

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1984...and Animal Farm. Animal Farm is one of my all-time favorite books.
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Old 06-30-2011, 06:34 AM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,487,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kevxu View Post
I wonder if in many schools there still is a core of American classics. I find not knowing about Tom Sawyer equivalent to not knowing about the Declaration of Independence.
I think that might be pushing it quite a bit; however, many kids don't study the Declaration in school. Sadly, my school didn't study it in depth. Now, I love history so I have done so on my own, but it is neglected, except in a general since, by many schools.

About Tom Sawyer: In 10th grade we were required to read Huck Finn. I hated it. I was a 15-year-old girl required to read about some dumb kid boy. Also, growing up in rural Mississippi, I was super-sensitive about the N-word that was in the book. That experience, rightly or wrongly, completely turned me off of Mark Twain for years. Some fifteen years later, I am more open to Twain, but I am still dubious.

Generally, I think there are many people who are forced to read complicated or "boring" books in HS or they are forced to read them too young, and it turns them off of the classics. I think that's really, really sad. Honestly, I wouldn't have grasped 1984, The Heart of Darkness, or Catch-22 in tenth grade. I read them as an adult and liked them. I was one of those kids who found books slowly and complicated language confused me and turned me off.

I guess I just have sympathy for folks for "didn't get it" in HS and rejected the classics as fun reading later in life. I think some of them would enjoy the classics if they picked up different authors or just different books.

Of course, there are those who weren't "scarred"; they are just lazy and illiterate. I have a few in my distant family.
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Old 06-30-2011, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
3,416 posts, read 1,564,179 times
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Of Mice and Men - short and easy read but also sad..
Catcher and the Rye - I still don't get the hype surrounding this book.
The Stand - you don't have to be a Stephen King nut to love this book!
Les Miserables - LONG, very LONG. Some Parts were incredible and some parts were hard to read.
Lonesome Dove - fun and easy read.
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Old 06-30-2011, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
2,779 posts, read 3,912,340 times
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There are so many best sellers on the fiction list every year that it doesn't surprise me when someone hasn't read one of those titles. The number of people that have never read books that we were assigned to read in Literature classes does surprise me. Examples: Tale of Two Cities, Robinson Crusoe, The Count of Monte Cristo, Lord of The Flies, Les Miserables, Oliver Twist, Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, 1984, Animal Farm just to name a few.

GL2
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Old 06-30-2011, 03:30 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,487,190 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunluvver2 View Post
The number of people that have never read books that we were assigned to read in Literature classes does surprise me. Examples: Tale of Two Cities, Robinson Crusoe, The Count of Monte Cristo, Lord of The Flies, Les Miserable, Oliver Twist, Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer, 1984, Animal Farm just to name a few.

GL2
Isn't it funny - I never had to read any of those in school! I read most of them as an adult.
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Old 06-30-2011, 05:34 PM
 
5,525 posts, read 6,159,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poletop1 View Post
Low-tracked?
Tracking (also called streaming or phasing) is separating pupils by academic ability into groups for all subjects within a school.[1] In a tracking system, the entire school population is assigned to classes according to whether the students' overall achievement is above average, normal, or below average. Students attend academic classes only with students whose overall academic achievement is the same as their own.

For more


Tracking (education) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-30-2011, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Texas
28,177 posts, read 24,286,762 times
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Sometimes I will say, "Sucks to your asmar."

No one ever knows what I'm talking about.
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Old 06-30-2011, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
2,779 posts, read 3,912,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peppermint View Post
Isn't it funny - I never had to read any of those in school! I read most of them as an adult.
I read all of them in Grade School or High School but didn't really enjoy them. When I was a few years out of College I reread all of them and loved them. It is difficult for MOST teens and pre-teens to comprehend adult life experiences.
GL2

Last edited by Gunluvver2; 06-30-2011 at 08:40 PM..
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Old 06-30-2011, 10:06 PM
 
1,249 posts, read 1,084,580 times
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The definition of a classic -- something that everybody wants to have read and nobody wants to read.


Mark Twain
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Old 06-30-2011, 11:36 PM
 
43 posts, read 34,808 times
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Sorry, freshman English class ruined me forever on reading Dickens, Great Expectations was a complete bust.
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