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Old 09-16-2011, 08:32 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
2,671 posts, read 3,737,185 times
Reputation: 2666
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mahrie View Post
Afternoon Gunluvver2!

. . .
I like JAWS for Windows (you can get it for Macs too) and I chose the most recent and comprehensive version, I don't remember what it's called, sorry, but Google will promptly give you a list of all the available versions. I need paragraphs and sometimes pages read back to me when I'm writing my novels, but there are less sophisticated versions available, and the price varies with the number of features required. I researched everything on the market and like JAWS best - by miles.

As for our Bible CDs, we listen to the NASV Translation but I don't have a clue who the narrator is. I'll ask my husband and see if it's printed in small print somewhere on the discs and let you know if I find out. . . .

P.S. Hubby just came home and told me that the narrator of the NASV Audio Bible is Steven B. Stevens. Doesn't ring a bell for me but perhaps you're familiar with him?

Mahrie,
I had a friend that used an early version of JAWS about fifteen years ago. It was the best available at the time but it was very expensive.

I like the NASV and the NIV alongside the KJV. I grew up with the KJV and I like the sounds of the Shakespearean type English but when I am studying I prefer the NIV.

I am not familiar with Steven B. Stevens" narration but I will check it out. I like Jerry Falwells narration but my old cassettes are getting worn out. If Morgan Freeman would narrate the Bible I would stand in line to buy it.

I do volunteer work with our State (Nebraska) Library Commission, Talking Book and Braille service. I started doing that about 12 years ago after having to take a medical retirement. I drove trucks over the road for many years and Audio books probably saved my life a few times by keeping me awake at night. I still listen to a lot of books on Audio. Our Lincoln, Nebraska city libraries have great selections of Cds, DVDs and electronic books so I can afford them.

Thanks for your reply,

GL2
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Old 09-16-2011, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Texas
28,114 posts, read 23,056,487 times
Reputation: 33627
I don't get it...if you are doing something else so you are listening because you need to do something while listening, then how are you really paying attention to the book (or, more importantly in the case of driving, how are you paying attention to the thing you're really supposed to be doing)? So why not just read it? Besides, reading it is WAY faster.

No. If I listened to a book on tape, I would say, "I listened to xyz book." If I read it, I'd say I read it. Also remember that some books on tape edit the book down so you may not get the whole thing.
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Old 09-16-2011, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Nebraska
2,671 posts, read 3,737,185 times
Reputation: 2666
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
I don't get it...if you are doing something else so you are listening because you need to do something while listening, then how are you really paying attention to the book (or, more importantly in the case of driving, how are you paying attention to the thing you're really supposed to be doing)? So why not just read it? Besides, reading it is WAY faster.

No. If I listened to a book on tape, I would say, "I listened to xyz book." If I read it, I'd say I read it. Also remember that some books on tape edit the book down so you may not get the whole thing.
************************************************** *******

You never drive with the radio on? You never talk to a passenger while driving?

Some people are forced to use audio books because of disabilities. Although I probably read ten books in print for every audio title I listen to I love the experience of listening to a good story read by an interesting narrator.

GL2
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Old 09-16-2011, 12:26 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,385,043 times
Reputation: 1996
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunluvver2 View Post
************************************************** *******

You never drive with the radio on? You never talk to a passenger while driving?

Some people are forced to use audio books because of disabilities. Although I probably read ten books in print for every audio title I listen to I love the experience of listening to a good story read by an interesting narrator.

GL2
I agree. Like I said earlier, I only listen to audio books when I commute back and forth from TN to MI. It's a 10-hour drive on I-75, and the radio stations come and go. Frankly, I get sick of my cds. I've made this trip about 10 times this summer, and listening to twenty hours of music is boring to me. I've listened to dozens of classic literature audio books during these drives. When I need to pull off to fill up my car with gas or to eat, I turn the cd off so I can concentrate on traffic. I also turn it off if the weather gets nasty and I need to focus on the road 100%.

I'm a little baffled by the arguments against audio books. I do understand that listening and reading are different physical acts so if you use words precisely (which most people do not do), I can understand how/why you'd differentiate. My purpose in reading is to expose myself to new ideas, which I can also accomplish by listening to audio books.
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Old 09-16-2011, 01:30 PM
 
1,376 posts, read 1,661,835 times
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I've listened to books during very long car rides, but not just to sit around and listen to.

And the narrarator better be good. I once checked out a book just to listen to George Guidell. (Unsure of how to spell his last name, if you're a fan of audio books, you will know him).

Yes, a lot of audio books are abridged, which makes me think I'm missing something.
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Old 09-16-2011, 01:49 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,385,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LongtimeBravesFan View Post
I've listened to books during very long car rides, but not just to sit around and listen to.

And the narrarator better be good. I once checked out a book just to listen to George Guidell. (Unsure of how to spell his last name, if you're a fan of audio books, you will know him).

Yes, a lot of audio books are abridged, which makes me think I'm missing something.
I always look for "unabridged" when I pick out audio books from the library. Once I got an abridged by accident and took it back. The audio books I get are usually 10-15 cds long unless they're children's audio books.
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Old 09-16-2011, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Texas
28,114 posts, read 23,056,487 times
Reputation: 33627
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunluvver2 View Post
************************************************** *******

You never drive with the radio on? You never talk to a passenger while driving?

Some people are forced to use audio books because of disabilities. Although I probably read ten books in print for every audio title I listen to I love the experience of listening to a good story read by an interesting narrator.

GL2
I never said there was anything wrong with listening to a book on tape (especially if you are disabled). But that is not the same thing as READING a book.

One is active. One is passive. And they are two different verbs that mean entirely different things.

If you want to read or listen and then say, "I was exposed to the information in this book," I wouldn't have a problem with it. But being exposed to the information is not the same as reading. You can't just use the words interchangeably because you were exposed to the same information.
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Old 09-16-2011, 09:02 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,385,043 times
Reputation: 1996
I disagree that listening to an audio is passive. I imagine that most teachers, mothers, and wives would also disagree. You definitely use different parts of the brain, but I'd hardly say listening is passive.
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Old 09-16-2011, 09:57 PM
 
26 posts, read 24,898 times
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I just had this conversation a few weeks ago with some friends.

Personally, I don't qualify listening to books on audio as "reading." I don't think of a person who is well-read as someone who has been able to "read" 2 books a week by listening to them in the car or while cooking. I see how easy it would be, but our children don't learn by listening to books on tape. However, "read" the best you can! Some people don't have the time and I completely understand. I wouldn't look down on you.
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Old 09-16-2011, 10:21 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 2,385,043 times
Reputation: 1996
Quote:
Originally Posted by chelala13 View Post
I just had this conversation a few weeks ago with some friends.

Personally, I don't qualify listening to books on audio as "reading." I don't think of a person who is well-read as someone who has been able to "read" 2 books a week by listening to them in the car or while cooking. I see how easy it would be, but our children don't learn by listening to books on tape. However, "read" the best you can! Some people don't have the time and I completely understand. I wouldn't look down on you.
This actually brings up a couple of points:

1) And this one has been brought up before, but is reading a book via braille still reading? Why? If a person is blind and they have listened to two audio books a week, seeing as how books in braille are expensive and few libraries carry them, are they not well read?

2) As a former teacher, I'd argue that while children may or may not learn from having books read aloud, they do certainly learn through listening and auditory instructions.

3) Piggy-backing off #2, some people are auditory learners. Some folks absorb more through listening. Now, I would argue that they should try to pick up physical books as much as possible to stretch their visual learning abilities.

4) How is listening to an audio book distractedly different from a person skimming a physical book?

5) Also, where does all of this leave poetry? When I was in college, I was taught that reading poetry is fine, but it's meant to be heard. Listening to poetry is how one "gets" it. Maybe my profs misinformed me.

I think folks just have different places that they draw the line. I draw the line at adaptations and abridged books since they alter the author's original work.
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