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Old 11-16-2010, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Quincy, MA
385 posts, read 1,258,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
I think it's whiter than most comparably sized cities. Also, Boston's more "diverse" neighborhoods are generally further out from the city center and the prototypical tourist attractions.
I think this is it. Visitors just don't visit those neighborhoods. And if they go to Fanueil Hall or something, they may not realize that most of the people they're seeing are other tourists, not locals.

 
Old 11-16-2010, 02:56 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
3,057 posts, read 5,240,877 times
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Boston isn't diverse? Huh?

From what I've heard, Boston has the most diverse population of Irish-Catholics in the World. Brown hair, blond hair, red hair, blue eyes, green eyes, male, female, tall, short. It reminds me of New York City, only without all of the different races.
 
Old 12-20-2010, 11:55 PM
 
5 posts, read 9,474 times
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People don't view Boston as diverse because all the diversity is on the fringes. Boston proper, (ie Beacon Hill, the West and North Ends, downtown, Back Bay, Fenway, and the South End) has become an almost exclusively upper and upper middle class white population. And Chinatown seems headed in the same direction. All the "diversity" is in Roxbury, Dorchester, East Somerville, East Boston, Jamaica Plain, Chelsea, Everett, Allston. You shouldn't have to go to the outer fringes of a city to experience diversity. Downtown Boston's diversity is this: Yuppies, College Students, and Tourists. Neighborhoods like Chelsea, Dudley Square, and Allston Village are way more interesting AND real then anything downtown.
 
Old 12-22-2010, 07:02 PM
 
83 posts, read 291,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lz1982 View Post
I think this is it. Visitors just don't visit those neighborhoods. And if they go to Fanueil Hall or something, they may not realize that most of the people they're seeing are other tourists, not locals.
^^ This.
 
Old 12-26-2010, 01:47 PM
 
1,296 posts, read 1,906,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
I think it's whiter than most comparably sized cities. Also, Boston's more "diverse" neighborhoods are generally further out from the city center and the prototypical tourist attractions. Most visitors never get to see Boston's most culturally vibrant neighborhoods.

Another point is that Boston's major historic immigrant groups are Irish and Italian. These groups are now very established in the area and don't really "jump out" as being so different. Of course, anyone who lives here now can tell you that the Cape Verdean, Brazilian, Haitian, and other new immigrants are a large presence in the city. Still, they're not as visible as the larger concentrations are outside the city center.

Finally, old stereotypes die hard.
So where do all of the African Americans, Hispanics, Indians, and Asians live in Boston?
 
Old 12-26-2010, 06:46 PM
 
Location: North Jackson
1,867 posts, read 2,978,200 times
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Stabbing Black people with American flags, and attempting to turn over school buses filled with Black children, make for compelling TV. And leave an impression that is hard to live down, even now decades later.

In any other major city in the USA, no matter where Black folks live, they do work downtown in significant numbers. You can't go to downtown NY, Philly, DC, LA, Atl, Chi, etc, without seeing Black folks.

Go to downtown Boston on a workday morning or evening, and you're likely to not see a single Black person.

Sure, Roxbury and Mattapan are filled with Black folk, but they don't work or venture downtown in any kind of significant numbers. This leads to people from other cities assuming there are no Black folks in Boston, because if there were, then surely they would be visible downtown (like they are in every other city in the USA).
 
Old 12-27-2010, 03:33 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
16,475 posts, read 33,447,811 times
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Why must every discussion about diversity end up being about race and the lack of visible black people in a particular area? And what's the big deal if an area appears very white? And why is that a crime that is solely the fault of white people?

The metro Boston area is extremely diverse and full of people from all nationalities, cultures, races and faiths. When I worked at on Boston restaurant, while the place was run by Albanians, the rest of the staff was a veritable United Nations soup. I worked with those that were from Sudan, Morocco, Greece, Scotland, Ireland and Brazil... just to name a few. And very few of those you see in Boston proper are able to afford to live there. Most live in the close surrounding neighborhoods. And we do have our Chinatown and Little Italy just as many other major cities do. But there are many tiny cultural clusters everywhere, usually grounded by a good ethnic grocery store. Humans by nature prefer to live near others that share common bonds of nationality and spirituality. It's convenient to live near a favorite food store and church. And it also feels comfortable to do so. So a lot of Russian Jews live in Brookline. Many Armenians live in Watertown and there are several great Armenian bakeries there that make great lamejuns. There are clusters of Brazilian neighborhoods in several towns. And the same goes for those from India and Pakistan.

What you see in the daytime in Boston on the streets are a lot of tourists. And they tend to be from other parts of the US, Europe and Asia. I really have never encountered a lot of black tourists. But maybe that's because Boston is an appealing destination for them. I think that many tourists come for historical attractions of the area, but most of that history is about the American Revolution and they would consider it white history.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 02:41 PM
 
Location: North Jackson
1,867 posts, read 2,978,200 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miu View Post
Why must every discussion about diversity end up being about race and the lack of visible black people in a particular area? And what's the big deal if an area appears very white? And why is that a crime that is solely the fault of white people?
It wouldn't be a "big deal" if the area was all-White for reasons other than Hate. For example, Minnesota is a pretty White state, but the Blacks who are from that area have nothing negative to say about how they were/are treated. However Boston has earned their reputation from the way they behaved during the 70s "busing" situation.

Your original statement about the lack of visible Black people being the discussion when diversity comes up, is because how White people treat Black folks is the true measure of the diversity of an area. You can list all the ethnicities you want, but if they tend to band together to fight off "the Blacks" then I would hardly call it a tolerant area. If the Irish, Italian, Scottish, Polish, German, etc. manage to live together, but then all join together to fight against a Black kid going to "their" school, then that speaks volumes about the true diversity of the city.

Your comments about history are way off-base as well. I am from Philly and I can see multitudes of tourists of all races in the historical parts of town. No one there is thinking of it as White history - it's American history.

Regardless, my comment about their not being any Black people "downtown" was not referring to Fan Hall or the Old State House - I was really talking about the financial area and such. The places where Boston people work every day.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 20,304,285 times
Reputation: 10182
To me, Boston is culturally diverse, but not really racially diverse on the scale of most major American cities. That is the same boat I would put Seattle in.
 
Old 12-28-2010, 03:09 PM
 
5 posts, read 5,031 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JacksonPanther View Post
Regardless, my comment about their not being any Black people "downtown" was not referring to Fan Hall or the Old State House - I was really talking about the financial area and such. The places where Boston people work every day.
You do realize that the Medical, Biotech and Education industries are the largest employers in Boston for the most part dont you? All of the above industries are centered in areas other than the Financial District. Take a walk around the Biotech hub Kendall Square, Medical Hub Longwood and the Universities and tell me there is no racial and ethnic diversity in these areas.

You comments about the Financial District show your lack of knowledge on the Boston area and where people actually work. Take a walk around the hospitals these days, there are more new Dr's from Asia and Africa than White Americans.
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