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Old 02-18-2017, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,117 posts, read 856,378 times
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You have to understand that there are relatively few top earners. When you have a bifurcated economy (two tiered) like Boston does there is a large increase in city services, retail, amenities and the like. Meaning when you increase the size of the creative class the service class grows even faster and the service class in metropolitan America is overwhelmingly minority. Most service workers in America are minorities and or immigrants. So as the top earners demand more Whole Foods and clothing stores immigrants come to work those jobs and to keep the economy running they are afforded subsidies as a populace. The growth of the creative sector and service sector pus the middle class workers out who in Boston were heavily white.
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Old 02-18-2017, 02:02 PM
 
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A lot of the jobs you describe are becoming automated. Whole foods isn't doing well. Even rich people dont want overpriced groceries.
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Old 02-18-2017, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
3,455 posts, read 4,354,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Boston was

49.5% white in 2000
47% white in 2010
44.6% white in 2015

And to an early comment yea I would agree the perception of Boston is white and the downtown area and college areas. But the lived in residential neighborhoods are very much so minority. So I'm sort of making my case that the reality of the citizens is different than the perception. Using the logic you all are utilizing that would be like saying Hartford CT is predominately white because the downtown Hartford is very white and people associate Hartford with its suburbs.
I don't think I was trying to say Boston is really white, but more that it seems much whiter than it actually is to most people. As a metro it's a lot whiter than any other major East Coast city, so the relatively high minority population is also partly an artifact of the relatively small city limits.

Whitest metropolitan areas in the United States - Everything2.com
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Old 02-18-2017, 02:09 PM
 
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Boston is diverse. If you spend most of your time in roxbury it probably seems black, if you spend most of your time in Charlestown or southie it probably seems white
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Old 02-18-2017, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,117 posts, read 856,378 times
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Originally Posted by Whatsnext75 View Post
Do you think what you described above is positive? That well off, high earning educated people have less kids and low earning lower educated people have more? What will this country be like in years to come if that continues? Already these types of people complain there are no jobs for them and education isnt getting any less expensive.

the hard facts is Boston is becoming a hard city to afford. Why people want to come here and pile a bunch of people in an apartment and work a minimum wage is beyond me..but is seems like that's what some people choose to do.
No I don't think it's a good thing, it's just the unfortunate reality.
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Old 02-18-2017, 10:12 PM
 
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'The growth of the creative sector and service sector pus the middle class workers out who in Boston were heavily white.'

I see what you're saying...so you say boston is becoming a city of rich folks who need these lower people there in the city also to serve them. But where do these service people live, how can they afford boston?

20/20 did a show recently about silicon valley and it was pretty disturbing. It showed a bus driver for google or someplace who spent his days driving high paid employees to work-the job had no benefits and there a few other awful details, another guy who commuted 3 hours to uc berkeley to serve food in the cafe there or something and then a woman who cleaned offices at visa but had no where to live. My point is that yes these service people are needed and there are jobs but they are still ****ty jobs. This place isnt quite like silicon valley but maybe it's on the way.

I know MIT pays their janitorial staff well. I think they all make $25 an hr and get full benefits.

Last edited by Whatsnext75; 02-18-2017 at 10:14 PM.. Reason: Added
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Old 02-19-2017, 01:08 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,117 posts, read 856,378 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatsnext75 View Post
'The growth of the creative sector and service sector pus the middle class workers out who in Boston were heavily white.'

I see what you're saying...so you say boston is becoming a city of rich folks who need these lower people there in the city also to serve them. But where do these service people live, how can they afford boston?

20/20 did a show recently about silicon valley and it was pretty disturbing. It showed a bus driver for google or someplace who spent his days driving high paid employees to work-the job had no benefits and there a few other awful details, another guy who commuted 3 hours to uc berkeley to serve food in the cafe there or something and then a woman who cleaned offices at visa but had no where to live. My point is that yes these service people are needed and there are jobs but they are still ****ty jobs. This place isnt quite like silicon valley but maybe it's on the way.

I know MIT pays their janitorial staff well. I think they all make $25 an hr and get full benefits.
They live scattered throughout the neighborhoods I said are diversifying as well as the classics of RDM. they tend to have moms Dads and an Older kid all contributing to family income and maybe even another older child or aunts and uncles who contribute to the household. I think Boston has many low income 3/4 income households. There is also a pretty robust drug trade in Boston that sustains many of the poorer residents that's for sure. Many do live in section 8 although that waiting list is about 4 years deep at the moment.. it is my experience that many find co-op or community trust arrangements and other alternative means of living.
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Old 02-19-2017, 06:26 AM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
3,973 posts, read 1,941,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whatsnext75 View Post
...
the hard facts is Boston is becoming a hard city to afford. Why people want to come here and pile a bunch of people in an apartment and work a minimum wage is beyond me..but is seems like that's what some people choose to do.
my experience is that being poor is better than living in poverty.
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Old 02-19-2017, 02:55 PM
 
3,268 posts, read 2,196,076 times
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https://www.bostonglobe.com/business....html#comments

fit in well with this discussion.

A women chose to live in a shelter before taking a section 8 voucher in hyde park and waited for a spot to open in Newton. I have to wonder if that's really gonna be worth it in the end. Are schools that bad in hyde park?

and what makes these poor people so entitled that they think they can just use newton schools? Plenty of other people would love to just be able to use them as well.
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Old 02-19-2017, 06:52 PM
 
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For what it's worth it seems a little ridiculous that poor people think their kids going to the same schools as other poor kids is beneath them. Maybe someone who is working hard and living weymouth would like the opportunity to send their kid to newton public schools. Instead the opportunity goes to someone who turned down section 8 to live in a shelter because the section 8 housing offer wasnt good enough. Ive heard newton public schools have become incredibly crowded...this isnt helping.

I would love to see what this kid ends up doing someday who's mom chose to live in a shelter all for newton public schools. I hope he appreciates it...but she also chose to be in the situation she was in. People dont suddenly just end up poor and with child one day.

I still think the city/state needs to do something about the wealth gaps...but poor people also shouldn't get to choose what affluent public school their kids go to just because a bunch of *******s around here want to give them a handout. Theyre ruining the schools for.the people who worked to get there!
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