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Old 12-06-2010, 10:42 PM
 
8 posts, read 15,154 times
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My job with Lowe's is transferring to the new Lowe's they are opening in Quincy. I've visited Boston a few times, but I really know nothing about the areas I should avoid or prefer in terms of crime and safety. I've grown up in big cities... I grew up in Detroit, and Phoenix... so I get that any time you have people packed together things are bound to happen, even in the "safer" areas. I'm not saying I don't want to live in Quincy, but right now I'm looking for the best deal I can get for my move-in costs, so I'm considering all areas in the greater Boston region within 15 miles of Quincy, but no further south than Quincy and no farther north than Revere. Also, I'd like to stay on the east side of I-95. Basically, I just want to have a good peace of mind that my car won't get broken into when I'm not by it, and my place won't get broken into when I'm not in it. Thanks for taking the time to read through all of this.
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Old 12-06-2010, 11:47 PM
 
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Do you plan to buy or rent? What's your approx. budget? What kind of general feel do want in the place where you live (urban, suburban, urban/suburban mix, open space or walk to the coffee shop around the corner)? Do you want ready access to public transit? There are a variety of communities in the area you're focusing on. Answers to questions like those above will help narrow things down to those that would be the best fit for you.
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Old 12-07-2010, 12:02 AM
 
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I'll be renting with an approximate monthly rent budget of 1600 for a 2 bedroom apartment. I like to live in places where there's a lot to do in my vicinity. During the warm months, I'd like to just be able to walk out of my place and find things to do. Being close to public transit is moderately important for those times where I'd like to go have a few drinks and be able to take the responsible route and not drive. I'm really walking blind right now. I've had people I know that live near Boston say that Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, and Dorchester are not the greatest areas to live, but then people on here say they are really nice, so I'm even more confused than when I had originally started haha.
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Old 12-07-2010, 02:18 AM
 
Location: Dallas
4,625 posts, read 8,598,994 times
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Well a big variable is are you driving or taking public transit? The Red Line goes to Quincy and if your work is close to a Red Line stop you have some nice options. If you're talking about being someplace where there are fun things to do, there are many stops along the red line that fit that bill and then you can totally avoid traffic hassles and even scrap the car insurance, parking hassles etc. The areas where all the fun things to do are the areas that have serious parking challenges.

Ok but by assuming you are keeping a car, your best bet is still to live somewhere on the Red Line. Let's say for example you lived in Southie or Savin Hill. You could hop on the Red line, go straight to downtown or Cambridge, get drunk as a skunk, then stumble back to Harvard or Park St station and take back home. You could also live in certain parts of DOT, but I wouldn't really rec that to someone from out of town who can't decipher the jigsaw puzzle pattern of DOT's good vs bad hoods. You could also choose somewhere in Cambridge - but don't expect a two bedroom for $1600. The Red Line also services the West End (If you Lived There, you'd be There now) and Beacon Hill (studio for $1600 but with all the prestige). Downtown Crossing too if you want downtown - just forget parking unless you go high-rise but then again, studio.

There's a spot out near UMASS called Columbia Point. I guess it's ok. Honestly keeping the car and wanting a two bedroom, I think Savin Hill or Quincy are your best options to start. Southie next - +1 for fun stuff, -1 for parking headaches. Anywhere north of Southie will be way fun, but not car friendly and more studio/maybe 1bdrm for $1600. Other alternatives with careful research could be Lower Mills or Ashmont in DOT, but again, I don't recommend.

Now factoring out the Red Line, you could plant yourself along the Orange Line or the commuter rail stops and drive crosstown while leaving the train to downtown option open. Look up MBTA.com. However, I don't see those as good options for what you describe.

I also think Revere, Eastie, etc is too far north and not on the Red Line so the commute gets way tougher. Bridge and tunnel traffic could be a pain in the arse. A lot of sitting.

One last word - the T stops running at 1am sharp. So if you want to stay in the pub until closing time, you'll be cabbing home unless you live in downtown like I did, in which you can stumble home with the thousands of other drunks who live in downtown. That's a really nice amenity - crazy fun. You haven't lived till you see a hundred college kids puking on Bolyston St on a Saturday night!
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Old 12-07-2010, 09:55 AM
 
8 posts, read 15,154 times
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Thanks for the detailed information. Also, thanks for letting me know about the MBTA website. I will be keeping my car, but my future place of employment is directly across from the Quincy Adams Station, and I think I may have found an apartment in Malden that has a shuttle to the Orange line. But I would only use that on days where my work schedule puts me driving thru rush hour. Most times, I'll be leaving for work around 6:30 am. So the commute at that time should be terrible. When I lived in Detroit and Phoenix, rush hour didn't really pick up until around 8.
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Old 12-07-2010, 09:43 PM
 
5,771 posts, read 13,416,382 times
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I'm not sure how the parking is in the area, but based on your other criteria I'd suggest checking the neighborhood around Porter Square in Cambridge. The neighborhood has developed into somewhat of a young professionals kind of area, very close to a big young professionals area in Somerville's Davis Sq., and right on the red line. Davis Sq. would be worth a look too, but I'm really not sure how the parking is around there, as Somerville is very densely populated and densely built.
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Old 12-08-2010, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Brookline, MA
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Honestly, I would go with Quincy. It meets so many of your criteria. Fits your price range. Super close to work, has public transportation, areas like Quincy Center and Wollaston walkable and commercial with bars, restaurants, shopping. Quincy is it's own city and like any large area, there are nice parts and not-so-nice parts. I lived there and really liked it (lived near Quincy Center). I'm not sure how old you are, but if you're in your 20s/30s, the area attracts a lot of people that age because of the T and the the proximity to Boston.

Davis Sq. and Porter Sq. in Cambridge aren't bad ideas either if you want to live in the city. But, you'll pay more for an apartment and parking will probably be a bigger pain.
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Old 12-08-2010, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,727 posts, read 3,249,328 times
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I'd stick with Quincy too. It has both a city feel and a family feel to it and is quite safe for the most part. I never hear of car break-ins in Quincy, just a few late night robberies at a couple of the MBTA Stations (Quincy Center, North Quincy) but that was a while ago. You should have no problems during the daytime and just stick to common sense at night and try not to walk on dimly lit places.

There should be plenty of affordable choices around the area where the new Lowes is. There is a lot if mixed housing all along that corridor, both renters as well as family homes. True Davis Sq, Porter Sq and all those nodes on the other side of town are hipper for young people but the ride back down to Quincy will be and awfully long one.
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Old 12-08-2010, 11:05 PM
 
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Thanks for all the input on this. I have placed 4 applications for apartments in my price range with the amenities I'm looking for. 2 in Quincy, 1 in Malden, and 1 in Revere. Malden has a strong pull with me right now because the couple of people that I already know in the area live within 10 miles and, call me strange, but I'd rather live close to my social life than my work life haha. I'm 26 and my roommate's 24, so what I've read about the area sounds inviting. I'll probably take Quincy as an alternate should things fall through in Malden. Anyone heard anything about the Grenada Highlands Apartments? And out of the 2 routes to Quincy, which sounds best... Broadway to 93 or US-1 to 93?
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Old 12-08-2010, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,714 posts, read 12,021,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thisnamerocks View Post
Thanks for the detailed information. Also, thanks for letting me know about the MBTA website. I will be keeping my car, but my future place of employment is directly across from the Quincy Adams Station, and I think I may have found an apartment in Malden that has a shuttle to the Orange line. But I would only use that on days where my work schedule puts me driving thru rush hour. Most times, I'll be leaving for work around 6:30 am. So the commute at that time should be terrible. When I lived in Detroit and Phoenix, rush hour didn't really pick up until around 8.

Why in the world would you want to live in Malden if your job is next to the Qunicy Adams Station? Get a place in Quincy or Braintree. At least until you get a feel for the area. Rush hour is brutal everywhere including Boston. Living North of Boston and working south of it, is asking for alot of misery especially as winter sets in.
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