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Old 12-24-2010, 06:05 PM
 
Location: California
396 posts, read 769,355 times
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Hi, I am appying to mba programs in entrepreneurship and Babson is #1 (not on my list, but in rankings for entrepreneurship). I am also looking to relocate since I want a change of scenery from Chicago.

Wellesly looks pretty secluded and I prefer to be in a little more congested area (I like running into strangers). Looking at Google maps, Wellesley looks to be about 13 miles from Boston, is there a good compromise to live somewhere in between? I've commuted daily about 9 miles to go to school in undergrad so it shouldn't be a problem, but could someone suggest a neighborhood that has a sizable population in the Boston area thats more towards west/sw of the city?

I am entertaining Arizona, and some schools in southern california since I prefer sun and warm but will be willing to sacrifice it for a good program (plus california is looking like s**t when it comes to opening up a business).
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Old 12-24-2010, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Maryland not Murlin
8,185 posts, read 21,737,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odannyboi View Post
(I like running into strangers).
Eh, take it from me and don't mention this again.


Anyways, you can take commuter rail from Back Bay Station in Boston to Wellesley. Take the Framingham/Worcester line and get off at Natick Station. Wellesley is like a mile walk from the station. Back Bay is easily accessible from most points around town.

Or, you can take a shuttle bus that runs between MIT and Wellesley/Babson. MIT is also pretty easily accessible by public transportation.

Both options will open up pretty much any spot in Boston.
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Old 12-24-2010, 07:27 PM
 
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If you take commuter rail, you don't have to go to Natick. There are three stops in Wellesley.

What would work best depends in part on whether you would plan to have a car and drive to campus. Depending on how much activity you'd like, and what kinds of activity, a couple of neighborhoods in Newton could work if you'd be driving to classes. Newton is a small city with several small commercial districts rather than one large downtown. Newton Centre and West Newton have two of the busier commercial districts. The commercial activity centers around small local stores, including some ethnic businesses, and small neighborhood eateries, some of them on the upscale side. If that appeals to you, these areas could work if you had a car, but would not be so good if you'd be depending on public transit, as there are large gaps in the times of commuter rail service in Newton in the direction you'd travel returning to Newton from Wellesley.

Finding the best area depends in part on the kinds of activities you'd like to have right outside your door. If you were planning to drive to Wellesley, some neighborhoods on the west side of Brighton, particularly Brighton Center and Oak Square, could be good if you'd like the neighborhood nightlife to center around local eateries and neighborhood bars. The area around downtown Waltham has a young professionals population, a bunch of restaurants, and an old-style downtown movie theater that shows an eclectic mix of films. If that sounds appealing, this area would be worth a look, again if you'd have a car and plan to drive to classes.

Without a car, the Coolidge Corner and Brookline Village neighborhoods in Brookline would be good possibilities if you'd enjoy a local neighborhood similar to the commercial districts in Newton but with quicker transit access to Boston. From those areas in Brookline you'd be looking at a ride into Boston on the green line subway/light rail line to catch the commuter rail out to Wellesley.

Jamaica Plain is another area with subway connections to the commuter rail line that goes to Wellesley. JP has a young professionals scene in some neighborhoods. Other neighborhoods aren't the greatest. I'm not familiar enough with that area to give you a street-by-street rundown on JP, but I can tell you that you want some good info on which neighborhood you're in if you move there. Not only are some streets and neighborhoods in JP not the nicest, but those areas also are likely to have less that would be of interest to a student/young professional kind of person.

All the areas I've suggested are based on the assumption that you'd be looking for a young professionals or established white collar kind of area. If the undergrad student scene is your thing, look in Boston around the Fenway and Kenmore Square (including the west end of Back Bay) sections of Boston. From those areas there's fairly quick subway service to Back Bay Station for the commuter rail to Wellesley, and at some hours you'd be able to catch the commuter train in the immediate vicinity of Kenmore Sq. at Yawkey Station.
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Old 12-25-2010, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
7,064 posts, read 10,808,136 times
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Babson is located in a residential neighborhood. You'd take the train to the Wellesley Hills stop and walk (maybe a mile and a half) from there. I think you need a car.

I second the recommendation for Brighton.
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Old 12-25-2010, 11:27 AM
 
Location: California
396 posts, read 769,355 times
Reputation: 276
Quote:
Originally Posted by K-Luv View Post
Eh, take it from me and don't mention this again.
explain, please.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
If you take commuter rail, you don't have to go to Natick. There are three stops in Wellesley.

What would work best depends in part on whether you would plan to have a car and drive to campus. Depending on how much activity you'd like, and what kinds of activity, a couple of neighborhoods in Newton could work if you'd be driving to classes. Newton is a small city with several small commercial districts rather than one large downtown. Newton Centre and West Newton have two of the busier commercial districts. The commercial activity centers around small local stores, including some ethnic businesses, and small neighborhood eateries, some of them on the upscale side. If that appeals to you, these areas could work if you had a car, but would not be so good if you'd be depending on public transit, as there are large gaps in the times of commuter rail service in Newton in the direction you'd travel returning to Newton from Wellesley.

Finding the best area depends in part on the kinds of activities you'd like to have right outside your door. If you were planning to drive to Wellesley, some neighborhoods on the west side of Brighton, particularly Brighton Center and Oak Square, could be good if you'd like the neighborhood nightlife to center around local eateries and neighborhood bars. The area around downtown Waltham has a young professionals population, a bunch of restaurants, and an old-style downtown movie theater that shows an eclectic mix of films. If that sounds appealing, this area would be worth a look, again if you'd have a car and plan to drive to classes.

Without a car, the Coolidge Corner and Brookline Village neighborhoods in Brookline would be good possibilities if you'd enjoy a local neighborhood similar to the commercial districts in Newton but with quicker transit access to Boston. From those areas in Brookline you'd be looking at a ride into Boston on the green line subway/light rail line to catch the commuter rail out to Wellesley.

Jamaica Plain is another area with subway connections to the commuter rail line that goes to Wellesley. JP has a young professionals scene in some neighborhoods. Other neighborhoods aren't the greatest. I'm not familiar enough with that area to give you a street-by-street rundown on JP, but I can tell you that you want some good info on which neighborhood you're in if you move there. Not only are some streets and neighborhoods in JP not the nicest, but those areas also are likely to have less that would be of interest to a student/young professional kind of person.

All the areas I've suggested are based on the assumption that you'd be looking for a young professionals or established white collar kind of area. If the undergrad student scene is your thing, look in Boston around the Fenway and Kenmore Square (including the west end of Back Bay) sections of Boston. From those areas there's fairly quick subway service to Back Bay Station for the commuter rail to Wellesley, and at some hours you'd be able to catch the commuter train in the immediate vicinity of Kenmore Sq. at Yawkey Station.
Wow, thanks! I'm trying to fly out there next month so I'll definitely check out these neighborhoods.

I actually don't like young urban professional areas but wouldn't mind the undergrad scene. Despite my educational/work background I prefer blue collar areas (born and raised in Southside Chicago).

I will be bringing my car unless I get driven to the poorhouse and end up having to sell it...

Seriously, thanks for taking the time to post that!
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Old 12-26-2010, 11:37 PM
 
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Again, the question of whether you'd have a car could be a factor in determining the best areas. I suggested a couple of neighborhoods in Brookline. Brookline bans parking on the street overnight, so anyone living there with wheels needs to have off-street parking included in the property or would need to rent a parking space. I'm not fully familiar with Newton's parking situation, but if I've got it right, generally parking on the street is allowed but I think they have some restrictions during snowstorms that can be a pain.

In any case, Newton and Brookline both are very affluent towns, which might not be the best fit based on your latest info about what character you prefer your neighborhood to have. Of any neighborhoods in those towns which I suggested above, Brookline Village might be the best fit for you if you'd have no car or could work out a parking arrangement. Brookline Village is an upscale area, but seems to have a mix of professionals, families, and some students, rather than being quite as exclusively affluent as much of Brookline, and Brookline Village is very close to the undergrad student areas around Boston University.

The Fenway/Kenmore Square area around B.U. could be a good fit for you if you really want a lot of an undergrad student scene. Parking could be an issue in that area because it's on the edge of the central city, so the area is densely built up and is pressed for parking.

Judging by what you say about your preferences in the character of a neighborhood, an area you might want to check out, near The Fenway and Northeastern University, is the Mission Hill neighborhood in Roxbury. The neighborhood has a mix of quite a few students, a scattering of young professionals, and a good number of solidly blue-collar black people who in many cases are more longtime residents of the neighborhood. Mission Hill's drawback is that it's another area near the fringe of the central city, so once again parking could be tight if you'd have a car. By public transit you'd have to reach Wellesley by first taking the T to a commuter rail station and then taking the commuter train out to Wellesley, then followed by the walk to Babson which Brightdoglover described. So Mission Hill may be a mix for your needs. The neighborhood's character could be a good fit, but it's not the best area for your transportation needs, whether by auto or public transit.

You really may want to look closely at those neighborhoods I suggested on the west side of Brighton. It depends on your transportation situation, as this would not be a good area to live if you needed to get to Wellesley by public transit. With a car, this could be a good area for you. Those areas in Brighton have a mix of young urban professionals, grad students, and a longtime blue-collar population (largely white, if that's a factor). It depends on what you'd prefer in the way of nightlife and shopping in your immediate neighborhood. In Oak Square and Brighton Ctr. you'd be looking at small local mom-and-pop kinds of places. The area has kind of an outer urban residential feel, with lots of single-family detached houses, but close together with tiny yards or basically no yards. So the area has a moderately urban neighborhood feel while being low-density enough so parking may be easier than right in the heart of the city.

Farther east, around Cleveland Circle in Brighton and the blocks on either side of Mass. Ave. in Brighton and Allston it's a big undergrad area. There are some college student kinds of dance clubs in Allston, and T service into other kinds nightlife in Boston proper. One potential drawback to these areas is that they have the reputation for having the student gheto problems with indifferent landlords and housing of so-so quality. The Brighton/Allston student areas are kind of hit-or-miss in that regard. You might luck into a decent place, or you might get screwed, but the area does have the undergrad feel you said you'd be okay with.

If and only if you'd have a car, you might also want to check out the area around downtown Waltham which I suggested in the earlier post. Getting from Waltham to Wellesley by public transit would be tough, but with wheels it's the closest of any places people have suggested here. While it's true that there has been an influx of young professionals into downtown Waltham in recent years, there's also a small Hispanic neighborhood west of downtown, a longtime blue-collar population, and a middle-class suburban family population on the north side of town. Not exactly the mix you had on Chicago's South Side, and definitely nowhere near as urban, but at least Waltham has some kind of a sociological mix rather than being totally a young professionals area, and if you'd have a car, Waltham gets some points for its proximity to Wellesley.

Last edited by ogre; 12-26-2010 at 11:53 PM..
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Old 12-27-2010, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Boston Suburb
2,025 posts, read 4,994,412 times
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Good advice on towns here already so I won't repeat. But I keep reading how one would get to Babson without a car. DON'T PLAN ON IT. The commuter rail station is not near Babson enough for walking. Plus, you have to go up a steep hill to get there.

Do it if you are: young and fit and you have plenty of time to do the walking, waiting for the train and subway connections and don't mind treaching through snow and getting to class late is no big deal and being limited by the sparse train schedule is ok.

So my only advice is to find a place that comes with a parking spot since you WILL need a car and in some towns parking can be a headache.
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Old 12-27-2010, 09:57 PM
 
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Correction for my post last night: It was CaseyB's post I was referring to which first outlined the walk from the train station in Wellesley Hills to Babson. I agree with MMYK72 that this can be done, but you'd need to be in decent shape, and used to doing a lot of walking while being outside in all kinds of weather, and used to negotiating public transit even on the bad days when there are delays.

Here is the transit service's page on the commuter rail line that serves Wellesley: MBTA Commuter Rail > Framingham / Worcester Lines Schedules and Maps. The timetables there should give you an idea whether the train schedules would be in sync with your class schedules.
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Old 12-28-2010, 06:56 PM
 
Location: California
396 posts, read 769,355 times
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Yup I would be bringing my car (I am kinda attached to it anyways).

Ogre... you are the MAN. Thanks for giving that info, I really appreciate it and will definitely use it while looking for a place. Its ok that the areas are pressed for parking because it the same situation over here.

I am googling some of these neighbohoods you mentioned and they look really nice!
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Old 12-28-2010, 10:38 PM
 
5,757 posts, read 13,320,646 times
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Hey, let us know which ones you like after you've seen them in person. Good luck with your search, and the college applications.
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