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Old 01-25-2011, 03:33 PM
 
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While you won't find a Williamsburg in the Boston area, you can certainly find something cooler than Brookline. What are the elements of cool? Old buildings, a mix of class and ethnicity, public spaces (indoors and out), higher ed institutions somewhere in the background (Williamsburg, though [physically] on Long Island, is 3 stops on the subway from NYU and its family of pretentious institutions, without which the hipster frenzy we know today would not exist)... Not an exhaustive list, but you get the idea. Allston has it, but in a more vulgar variety; Davis in a hip-but-clean version; Central in a Telegraph Ave street people aspect. Harvard Square had it all when we baby boomers were young but alas... Northeastern's new prominence may have something to do with the intermittent scenes in Rox and Jamaica Plain along the orange line stops.
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Old 01-28-2011, 01:04 PM
 
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I guess the question is...do you want a lively arts/music scene? Or is it that you want to be around a lot of people who all happen to be wearing the same too-tight pants and the latest ironic trend co-opted from Gen X's earlier version?

Because if it's the former...I'd say Central Square, Inman Square, parts of JP, Union Square, etc. Really, a lot of places. Doing a mental tabulation, I'd say that the majority of my friends are artists or musicians, or both. None of them would be considered "hipsters". You can be an artist, an intellectual, and a weirdo without being a hipster.

If you just want to see people dressed in the hipster uniform...I dunno. Maybe Allston?
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Old 01-28-2011, 04:39 PM
 
Location: Up North
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milkandhoney View Post
I want alternative vibes and beautiful people.
Try another state
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Old 02-03-2011, 07:13 AM
 
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this is interesting because I have basically the same question as the OP, for a completely different reason. I'm leaving NYC because i find it way too crowded, dirty, expensive, and generally too much of a sensory/financial assault on all fronts. but my social circle here is mostly 20-30 year old 'hipsters' of some sort or another (no one will admit to the label, but they are young people who wear tight jeans/thrift store fashion, party a lot, often have higher education, are into 'alternative' music and art scenes).. I would love to be involved in these things here in NY but I can't deal with the roaches, the expense, the cancerous rats dying on subway platforms, the horrible post-industrial aura of decay in brooklyn in general - or the constant jockeying for social status near bedford ave on the L. I like (many of) the people but the situation is too ADD and over the top for me to participate really.

I have work lined up in brookline, MA and really enjoyed my time at Tufts Univeristy where I did undergrad studies, but brookline is such a culture shock to me coming from 6 years of life in NYC that I feel highly uncomfortable about living anywhere nearby. I'm a 28 year old man and similarly plan to bike everywhere.. I'll be sure to consider the suggestions in the serious posts in this thread.

having lived on campus at tufts for 4 years, and spent a lot of time in davis sq, I find that area pretty non-hipster. many of the young people are affiliated with tufts, which had during my tenure a small hipster population who generally fled the campus for other parts of the boston metro area at any opportunity. it was mainly a relaxed-fit jeans, white new balance sneakers and generic t-shirt or polo kind of scene, with many exceptions of course. the architecture in the area borders on suburban as well if you stray off the main drag. diesel in davis seems to attract a good number of more 'hipster' or young fringe artistic types however. It seems like a good place to meet people at least.
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Old 02-04-2011, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Up North
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Originally Posted by PaulDenton View Post
this is interesting because I have basically the same question as the OP, for a completely different reason. I'm leaving NYC because i find it way too crowded, dirty, expensive, and generally too much of a sensory/financial assault on all fronts. but my social circle here is mostly 20-30 year old 'hipsters' of some sort or another (no one will admit to the label, but they are young people who wear tight jeans/thrift store fashion, party a lot, often have higher education, are into 'alternative' music and art scenes).. I would love to be involved in these things here in NY but I can't deal with the roaches, the expense, the cancerous rats dying on subway platforms, the horrible post-industrial aura of decay in brooklyn in general - or the constant jockeying for social status near bedford ave on the L. I like (many of) the people but the situation is too ADD and over the top for me to participate really.

I have work lined up in brookline, MA and really enjoyed my time at Tufts Univeristy where I did undergrad studies, but brookline is such a culture shock to me coming from 6 years of life in NYC that I feel highly uncomfortable about living anywhere nearby. I'm a 28 year old man and similarly plan to bike everywhere.. I'll be sure to consider the suggestions in the serious posts in this thread.

having lived on campus at tufts for 4 years, and spent a lot of time in davis sq, I find that area pretty non-hipster. many of the young people are affiliated with tufts, which had during my tenure a small hipster population who generally fled the campus for other parts of the boston metro area at any opportunity. it was mainly a relaxed-fit jeans, white new balance sneakers and generic t-shirt or polo kind of scene, with many exceptions of course. the architecture in the area borders on suburban as well if you stray off the main drag. diesel in davis seems to attract a good number of more 'hipster' or young fringe artistic types however. It seems like a good place to meet people at least.
Since when was caring about other things besides bad trendy fashion a bad thing? This discredits anything else you were going to say.

Its too bad you can't come up with a better way to describe a group of people other than by how they dress.
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Old 02-05-2011, 03:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Since when was caring about other things besides bad trendy fashion a bad thing? This discredits anything else you were going to say.

Its too bad you can't come up with a better way to describe a group of people other than by how they dress.
You may have noticed that there is a loose correlation between people's style of dress and certain of their values and personality characteristics - this is because they choose what to wear and the decision process is evident through the results. I did not say that people who dress in this way are 'bad.' that would be ridiculous and in fact I've had friends at Tufts and elsewhere who match this description pretty much word for word. But none of them (so far) were painters, serious musicians, or free-thinking foreign revolutionaries. They were computer science majors, engineers or poli sci. Some of them very bright and with an excellent sense of humor.

I'm sure you can find me some genius indie musician who wears the uniform i described, and I'm sure I can find an intern at the H.R. department of Gillette who's majoring in mechanical engineering and dresses like noel fielding in the mighty boosh. this is because I am speaking in generalities which is a necessity when discussing the topic at hand: demographics of different areas.

I'll stand by this: If you want to be surrounded by artists and intellectuals (personally I like the former and have little use for the latter), and you're on a campus where the de facto uniform is relaxed fit levis, white new balance sneakers and a generic text-bearing t-shirt or polo, you're on the wrong campus. This is not becuase I am horribly shallow (a wild logical leap on your part), but because the majority of young artists and 'intellectuals' would not be caught dead dressed that way. Likewise I think the majority of the Tufts Engineering department would feel similarly about going to class in skinny jeans, boat shoes and a v-neck t-shirt.

I hope this clarifies the matter
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Dallas
4,625 posts, read 8,536,495 times
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My vote is be on the Red Line. Central Sq, Porter Sq, Davis Sq. Central is best. Most action, eccentricity. Not Boring. Easy on - off to Davis?Porter/HVD/ Park St. Sounds like fun to me. Boy, you think YOU'RE bored. Come to suburban Dallas. I'm ready to move to Mexico and join the Zetas!
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Old 02-06-2011, 08:22 AM
 
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as others have said - Boston's hipsters are spread out all over the city - there aren't hipster ghettos here.

you might prefer living in somerville/cambridge just because there are a lot of people your age, and you'll eventually run into young starving artist/musician types. JP is about the same, but has more trees and is a little older and more activist.

IMO - don't follow the scene, though... head someplace you like and make your own scene. there are artist contingents in southie, east boston, roxbury, parts of dorchester, and roslindale - but boston is pretty insular and unless you go out and find groups that do things you're into, you aren't going to find that critical mass of people doing weird stuff like you are in other cities. it's kind of a shame since there's a lot of energy here, but I think maybe because everyone's in school and no one has any free time.
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