U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 04-20-2012, 07:12 AM
 
Location: London/Doha/Cambridge
1,833 posts, read 1,277,953 times
Reputation: 1192

Advertisements

I agree about 10 Tables, I wasnt as impressed as everyone else, but if I lived near by I could see it becoming a place I try a few times.

Its unfortunate that your experience at Craigie wasnt great. I go there often, especially to the bar and am always impressed. Give a few more places on that list a try and you may have a new perspective on Boston's dining scene.

Another place it pained me to leave off was Istanbul'lu in Telle Square. I spent 2010 living in Istanbul and its the closest to a casual authentic homestyle Turkish restaurant I have tried in N. America.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-20-2012, 04:51 PM
 
121 posts, read 121,131 times
Reputation: 114
I have visited Boston a couple of times now. I recently visited SF and I though it looked like boston in many areas. Also, as a region SF is surrounded by natural beauty. Boston as a region also appealed to me due to proximity of Newport, Capecod and the islands with White mountains a couple of hrs away.

The walkability, public transit, the geographical region and the economical aspects together makes the city world class.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2012, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
2,667 posts, read 2,469,755 times
Reputation: 2938
Quote:
Originally Posted by kram79 View Post
I have visited Boston a couple of times now. I recently visited SF and I though it looked like boston in many areas. Also, as a region SF is surrounded by natural beauty. Boston as a region also appealed to me due to proximity of Newport, Capecod and the islands with White mountains a couple of hrs away.

The walkability, public transit, the geographical region and the economical aspects together makes the city world class.
Boston is world class. I think it's quite possibly THE most walkable city in the United States. One great thing about it is that while it's quite big, you can get out of it relatively quickly and find yourself in Cape Cod, Cape Ann, or the stunning scenery of western MA.

As a non-American, I would definitely come to Boston specifically as a tourist. It's a special place.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2012, 05:37 PM
SXN
 
350 posts, read 639,068 times
Reputation: 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by lucas9 View Post
LOL, who talks about Chicago?

NYC of course. LA, sure. I hear people talk about Boston just as much as they do Chicago. The only thing anyone says about Chicago these days how its population is declining and how high the crime is.
When's the last time Boston was considered for hosting the Olympics?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2012, 05:50 PM
SXN
 
350 posts, read 639,068 times
Reputation: 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post

Chicago has a more extensive subway network because it's a larger city. However, I find that Boston's system serves the city and metro better than Chicago's and is more efficient. Chicago is plagued by delays and service trouble.

You gotta be kidding. Have you ever been on the green line?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-03-2012, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,259 posts, read 3,061,124 times
Reputation: 1516
Irfox: Seafood in Seattle is loads better than in Boston, and that's gospel. Chinese food in Boston is better not mentioned, especially not in the same breath as SF.

Times Square is leagues above Faneuil Hall in terms of popular culture and special moments. To be fair, Battery Park is also not among those, as even fewer people know about that.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Boston
5,408 posts, read 9,482,482 times
Reputation: 5796
Quote:
Originally Posted by SXN View Post
You gotta be kidding. Have you ever been on the green line?
The Green Line is light rail, not heavy rail like the Red, Orange, or Blue lines. The closest thing to the Green Line in the US is San Francisco's Muni Metro and the Green Line is LIGHTYEARS ahead of that in terms of speed in efficiency.

I've spend a total of 1.5 months in Chicago for both leisure and work. The Blue Line (from O'Hare to the loop) is broken down somewhere along the line about 50% of the time I'm there.

I'm not saying Boston's network is perfect. Far from it. But Chicago's is more frustrating from a reliability standpoint. I also think it's less user friendly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
Irfox: Seafood in Seattle is loads better than in Boston, and that's gospel. Chinese food in Boston is better not mentioned, especially not in the same breath as SF.
Honestly, I don't know enough of Seattle's seafood to counter that. I've only been once and briefly (flew into Seattle en route to Vancouver and spent two days before renting a car and continuing on). However, even if Seattle is better it's one city. I've been to most major cities on either coast and Boston is definitely at the top of the list for seafood. That includes San Francisco.

Boston hurts in the Chinese food area because of quantity, not quality. Boston's Chinatown is nowhere NEAR as big as SF, LA, NYC, etc. However, there are places in Boston that are as good as what you'll find in almost any major city in this country. Again, I've been to some of the "best" places in San Francisco. SF is a second home to me. I've had Chinese food in Boston that's just as good as the best I've had in SF. There's just a LOT more to choose from over there. If you want to get into other Asian cuisine, it's no contest. San Francisco has a lot more.

Quote:
Times Square is leagues above Faneuil Hall in terms of popular culture and special moments. To be fair, Battery Park is also not among those, as even fewer people know about that.
Yes and no. They're so different that it's tough to do a head to head comparison. Times Square is so well known around the world that you immediately get a real sense of place. There's always something going on there too (though it's usually pretty lame). That said... once you've spent 10 minutes looking at the lights and admiring all the people, the moment is over. It's flashy, gaudy and obnoxious. It's full of overpriced goods and gimmicks that target naive tourists. While every visitor to NYC needs to see it, it really offers more than a photo op. Faneuil Hall is very touristy, but it offers more than just overpriced goods for tourists. It's truly colonial and a great exhibit of Federalist architecture whereas Times Square is billboards, lights and monoliths. From a content standpoint, Faneuil Hall is a great gateway to the waterfront and does offer good food and recreation options for both tourists and locals alike.

Battery Park is very well known as it's where the tourist boats to Ellis Island/Statue of Liberty come in, it's adjacent to the Staten Island Ferry, and it offers one of the best (only, really) views of the Statue of Liberty from Manhattan.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Houston
2,259 posts, read 3,061,124 times
Reputation: 1516
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
T
Honestly, I don't know enough of Seattle's seafood to counter that. I've only been once and briefly (flew into Seattle en route to Vancouver and spent two days before renting a car and continuing on). However, even if Seattle is better it's one city. I've been to most major cities on either coast and Boston is definitely at the top of the list for seafood. That includes San Francisco.
It's not to say that Boston doesn't have good seafood at all, but much better can be had in other cities (like Seattle) for less. If you ever go again, you'll see it's not even a comparison.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Boston hurts in the Chinese food area because of quantity, not quality. Boston's Chinatown is nowhere NEAR as big as SF, LA, NYC, etc. However, there are places in Boston that are as good as what you'll find in almost any major city in this country.
I believe that's false. Boston's Chinese food quality tends to be very poor, as it caters to a very specific population. I think SF is light years ahead in terms of quality Chinese cuisine. I really can't think of one restaurant in this city that I would recommend to my friends from China or California. In fact, a lot of the Chinese friends I have here have commented that Boston's Chinese food tends to be much more Americanized. We won't even go into sushi. I would place Boston mid-second tier in terms of all around food options.
[/quote]

Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
Yes and no. They're so different that it's tough to do a head to head comparison. Times Square is so well known around the world that you immediately get a real sense of place. There's always something going on there too (though it's usually pretty lame). That said... once you've spent 10 minutes looking at the lights and admiring all the people, the moment is over. It's flashy, gaudy and obnoxious. It's full of overpriced goods and gimmicks that target naive tourists. While every visitor to NYC needs to see it, it really offers more than a photo op. Faneuil Hall is very touristy, but it offers more than just overpriced goods for tourists. It's truly colonial and a great exhibit of Federalist architecture whereas Times Square is billboards, lights and monoliths. From a content standpoint, Faneuil Hall is a great gateway to the waterfront and does offer good food and recreation options for both tourists and locals alike.

Battery Park is very well known as it's where the tourist boats to Ellis Island/Statue of Liberty come in, it's adjacent to the Staten Island Ferry, and it offers one of the best (only, really) views of the Statue of Liberty from Manhattan.
That's exactly what tourists do though---"the lame stuff." Usually when you're a tourist you have a limited amount of time to see all the things that you should see and if someone was coming to America they'd most certainly probably choose to see Times Square over Faneuil Hall, even though Times Square is admittedly overdone. You don't get the same sense of awe from Faneuil hall, namely because you have to have much more understanding of the history.

Also, you really get much better views and atmosphere from the Brooklyn Heights promenade, because you can see all of the city; It's definitely much more scenic and charming than Battery Park.

Last edited by theSUBlime; 05-04-2012 at 03:54 PM..
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 03:57 PM
 
1,029 posts, read 2,172,202 times
Reputation: 509
So you're going to compare the largest/oldest Chinatown on the Pacific Rim with Boston? What's next, you're going to say the Grand Canyon beats any river valley in New England? You're basically cherry picking the most famous (Read: often overrated) feature from different cities to say Boston is lacking? I don't want to get drawn into another pissing contest that people on here seem to love, but we could easily do the same for Boston. Did you know that Berkeley and Stanford are second tier to Harvard and MIT? Did you know that Brazilian food in Framingham kills Oakland? How embarrassing! Did you know that the Needle is second tier to the CN Tower? Did you know that Worcester has a better armor museum than Los Angeles?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-04-2012, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Boston
5,408 posts, read 9,482,482 times
Reputation: 5796
Quote:
Originally Posted by theSUBlime View Post
It's not to say that Boston doesn't have good seafood at all, but much better can be had in other cities (like Seattle) for less. If you ever go again, you'll see it's not even a comparison.
Maybe so. But I think that Boston's best seafood (in terms of value) is, unfortunately, outside of the city proper. I think you have to visit some of the smaller towns on the coast inside the metro and just outside to experience the best (Gloucester and New Bedford jump immediately to mind). Much of what's in Boston is overpriced. That goes for everything from ultra high end seafood to cheapest fried seafood. I think many people in the Boston area have no idea what seafood riches they have right in their own backyard. Fresh claim boils... enough to feed 6 people... for $16 can be found all over Fall River and New Bedford. I've been to a few clam shacks along the coast that serve lobster rolls for $10-12 that have what feels like a pound or more of meat on them. Nowhere... and I mean nowhere in the country does scallops better than Massachusetts. You can take that to the bank. If you've had good scallops in another city, there's a very good chance they came from Massachusetts. I've had "New Bedford Scallops" in a high end restaurant in Paris.

Also, Boston's hardly the only city that doesn't offer cheap seafood. I've never seen good, cheap seafood in New York, Miami, DC, LA, or San Francisco. They're no better than Boston in that regard. I've had surprisingly good calamari in Phoenix, though which shocked the hell out of me.

Quote:
I believe that's patently false. Boston's Chinese food quality tends to be very poor, as it caters to a very specific population. I think SF is light years ahead in terms of quality Chinese cuisine. I really can't think of one restaurant in this city that I would recommend to my friends from China or California.
I guess we'll agree to disagree. I would tell you that in Boston Potluck Cafe is a good "general purpose" restaurant. If they're looking for a specific dish or a specific type of Chinese cuisine, there are other options. Quincy has plenty too.

Quote:
In fact, a lot of the Chinese friends I have here have commented that Boston's Chinese food tends to be much more Americanized. We won't even go into sushi. I would place Boston mid-second tier in terms of all around food options.
Almost every Chinese person I've spoken with in San Francisco says the exact same thing about San Francisco's Chinese food. In Chinatown, that sentiment is almost comically drawn out beyond the restaurants as even the architecture was designed by an American to look Chinese and isn't based on anything authentic. My girlfriend lived in the Laurel Heights area. We've tried a bunch of places on Clement and nearby streets that were merely OK. San Francisco gets a TON of credit for having outstanding Chinese food. But real authentic options are few and far between.

Boston's sushi is lacking on the lower price levels. It's really hard to find anything that's not some sort of "crazy roll!" loaded with tempura and spicy mayo. I've had a real hard time finding simple sashimi and sushi made with fresh ingredients for a reasonable price here. But on the high end, Boston does alright. There are a few very good places and O Ya is one of the top 5 sushi restaurants in the country according to a lot of measures (many rank it number 1). I would certainly agree. It's one of the best meals I've had anywhere.

I don't know about other types of food either. I haven't seen a city with as good a selection of food from the Caribbean. Portuguese food (especially outside the city a little bit) is outstanding in Boston. You'd be hard pressed to find a single Portuguese place in many other cities. Boston has excellent Brazilian food too. Italian is an obvious and easy choice. Outside of NYC and Chicago (and possibly Philadelphia) no city beats Boston for Italian. Boston has two high end French restaurants (Menton and L'Espalier) that are better than what you'll find in most cities as well.

It's a generations old stereotype that Boston doesn't do food well. It's just plain inaccurate. Of course, some cities are better in certain areas, but Boston beats many in others. It's certainly no slouch when it comes to food and it's definitely not second tier (unless you consider the top tier to be only NYC and LA). I'd rank it 5th or 6th in the US overall. 1) NYC, 2) LA, 3)Chicago (yes, I meant to put it there) 4) SF and 5) Boston.

Quote:
That's exactly what tourists do though---"the lame stuff." Usually when you're a tourist you have a limited amount of time to see all the things that you should see and if someone was coming to America they'd most certainly probably choose to see Times Square over Faneuil Hall, even though Times Square is admittedly overdone. You don't get the same sense of awe from Faneuil hall, namely because you have to have much more understanding of the history.
You're right that most tourists would choose Times Square over Faneuil Hall if they have limited time. Why wouldn't they. It's far more famous. However, that hardly means it's better. If you ask international tourists which specific spot they like better, you'd likely find that most prefer Faneuil Hall (I know the vast majority I've met would say that).

Quote:
Also, you really get much better views and atmosphere from the Brooklyn Heights promenade, because you can see all of the city; It's definitely much more scenic and charming than Battery Park.
Absolutely. I was just going from the tourists perspective. All of the hop on, hop off tours stop there, the ferries, and the views make it a popular tourist spot. Brooklyn more or less doesn't exist in the minds of some tourists.

Last edited by lrfox; 05-04-2012 at 04:18 PM..
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top