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Old 03-06-2012, 10:40 PM
 
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I have a friend in NYC that told me he knows a few families that got priced out of the area, and moved to Florida, Oregon, etc. just anywhere that is cheaper in rent.

Do any people here know someone that moved out of the Boston area/State because of the cost of living? It shocks me that rent is soooooo expensive in Boston. For 750 a month, i'm renting a 2 bedroom in Seattle, while in Boston, a 2 bedroom costs 1800+


thanks
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:38 PM
 
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$750 for a 2bdr in Seattle is pretty good deal. I know people paying $1300, and about to be priced out of the area.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:00 AM
 
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Seriously, there seems to be a post every week on here about getting priced out of Boston. Yes, it's happening, but it has pretty much been the case in every major US city ever since suburban flight started reversing in the 80s and 90s. Boston is a small city, just under 50 sq mi like San Francisco. Unlike some old cities like Philadelphia, it did not gobble up the surrounding towns. Philadelphia has almost three times the area of Boston. Unlike some newer towns, Boston developed before the era of automobiles and sprawl. Phoenix has over ten times the area of Boston! So much of what we would call the suburbs here in Boston, would be part of the city elsewhere. I mention all this to give some perspective. Based purely on city size, it's silly for one to say, "I can still buy in Phoenix but I'm priced out Boston." You add it lax building codes, virtually limitless land for building, and a fraction of the student population, and it gets really silly to compare Boston with a place like Phoenix.

One can live 20-30 miles from downtown Boston and find reasonably priced houses that are in safe neighborhoods. Some places like Ayer even have commuter rail access. Do you know what 20-30 miles away from San Francisco (the closest analogue to Boston) will get you? Nothing or a bullet to the chest. You're still priced out in places like Walnut Hill, Petaluma, and Palo Alto. You have to go twice that distance for the average earner to think about buying in a safe place.

Seriously, enough already.
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Old 03-07-2012, 04:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cato the Elder View Post
Seriously, there seems to be a post every week on here about getting priced out of Boston.

Seriously, enough already.
That's because the OP keeps starting them.

anyone know people who were priced out of boston/ma?
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Old 03-07-2012, 09:41 AM
 
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It may not be as bad as San Francisco or Manhattan, but it IS a problem.
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Old 03-07-2012, 10:28 AM
 
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Well, it's a world wide problem and for someone to come on here every other day with a "OMG" post is overkill. Someone from Boston could easily head to the Seattle forum and say, "I have a $500/month studio in Boston (nevermind that it's roach infested and under a T bridge), I can't believe apartments around Pike Place are double that!" Yeah, we get Seattle is generally cheaper than Boston, but it's been getting more expensive as well like every city not named Detroit. Someone from Minneapolis could incessantly post about wanting to return to his hometown of Seattle but getting priced out. It gets a bit tired after a while though when it's the same person beating the same pulverized horse.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:17 PM
 
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well, yes I asked this question before and it didnt really get answered, maybe 1 person answered it before someone attacked me. and now i'm getting attacked here.

I wanted to know because i want to move back to the Boston area, I was born and raised in Boston. I don't want to get to a point where I move there for 5 years, rent keeps on going up, T fares keep on going up, and I find myself coming back to seattle or going somewhere else. I thought this is a forum that people like you guys, help people like me who ask a question, and I do the same in return.

thanks Dport7674 and Bruins_fan for your response. you earned rep points.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:40 PM
 
1,430 posts, read 2,095,208 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cato the Elder View Post
Seriously, there seems to be a post every week on here about getting priced out of Boston. Yes, it's happening, but it has pretty much been the case in every major US city ever since suburban flight started reversing in the 80s and 90s. Boston is a small city, just under 50 sq mi like San Francisco. Unlike some old cities like Philadelphia, it did not gobble up the surrounding towns. Philadelphia has almost three times the area of Boston. Unlike some newer towns, Boston developed before the era of automobiles and sprawl. Phoenix has over ten times the area of Boston! So much of what we would call the suburbs here in Boston, would be part of the city elsewhere. I mention all this to give some perspective. Based purely on city size, it's silly for one to say, "I can still buy in Phoenix but I'm priced out Boston." You add it lax building codes, virtually limitless land for building, and a fraction of the student population, and it gets really silly to compare Boston with a place like Phoenix.

One can live 20-30 miles from downtown Boston and find reasonably priced houses that are in safe neighborhoods. Some places like Ayer even have commuter rail access. Do you know what 20-30 miles away from San Francisco (the closest analogue to Boston) will get you? Nothing or a bullet to the chest. You're still priced out in places like Walnut Hill, Petaluma, and Palo Alto. You have to go twice that distance for the average earner to think about buying in a safe place.

Seriously, enough already.
Well said.

Having spent a lot of time in Chicago, I always found it interesting to compare the surroundings of O'Hare to the equal distance outside of Bostons city center which would be.... Hanscom. Totally different worlds because of the layout of the city, age, and zoning. I went to the top of the Sears tower once, and there were many roads that went straight until they were lost on the Horizon.


I feel like some people (not necessarily the OP) lack the desire to think outside the box when researching where to live. They look at center city Boston, see the rent prices, and complain. While some research would fine some decent deals to be had in and around the city.

I recently moved from Allston to Townsend, MA which may seem like a massive distance away from Boston, but it is really not. My house is a 1980s 3/4 bed, 1200sf, cape on .7 acres in a subdivision for 230k... not exactly a wallet breaking price. If I want to go into the city, I can be there in an hour. I either rout 2 it or go on 93 depending on where in the city I need to go to. Funny thing is, it took me longer to get to the TD Garden when I was in Allston. Maybe I have thick skin because I work in the construction industry, but I think it is totally feasible for someone to commute from where I live to Boston if they worked a 7-330 or 6-230

Its the same way with parking and having a car in the city. I lived on Mission Hill and in Allston for 5 years and had my car for all of them. I never had to look more than 5mins for a spot, never got it broken into, and was able to learn the ins and outs of the city neighborhoods so that I could drive where ever and not have to waste time on the T. There is enough 2 hour, m-f parking in the city that you should never have to pay for parking.


To the OP,.... I would look at Oak Square, Melrose, Fort Hill, and Dorchester-Savin Hill-over the bridge for apartments. All of those are a good blend of affordable, safe, and entertaining.

Last edited by Boston_Burbs; 03-07-2012 at 01:32 PM..
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Old 03-07-2012, 02:14 PM
 
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Agreed as well. I just found an apartment for $900 in Taunton. If you go to the suburbs and outer outlying areas you will get cheaper rates. Not all jobs require you to "go" into boston.
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Old 03-07-2012, 05:34 PM
 
1,039 posts, read 3,084,234 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by civic94 View Post
well, yes I asked this question before and it didnt really get answered, maybe 1 person answered it before someone attacked me. and now i'm getting attacked here.

I wanted to know because i want to move back to the Boston area, I was born and raised in Boston. I don't want to get to a point where I move there for 5 years, rent keeps on going up, T fares keep on going up, and I find myself coming back to seattle or going somewhere else. I thought this is a forum that people like you guys, help people like me who ask a question, and I do the same in return.

thanks Dport7674 and Bruins_fan for your response. you earned rep points.
No one is attacking you. Some are just questioning the sincerity/efficacy of these posts. Are you truly just looking for answers? Okay, the answer is yes. I know someone who wanted a mansion in the Back Bay and was priced out so they had to settle for Wellesley. And yes, yes (rent will keep going up in most places, and T fares are guaranteed to go up). Now how does this help you?

But let's me honest. Are you truly looking for magic answers to such an overarching and vague question? Or were you here hoping to drum up some malcontents willing to commiserate with you?

No place is perfect for everyone at all times. I can guarantee you that many people weren't happy in Boston 100 years ago, 50 years ago, 20 years ago, and 10 minutes ago.
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