U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-16-2013, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Camberville
11,407 posts, read 16,042,027 times
Reputation: 18109

Advertisements

Higher ed is a tradeoff - you make less money until you hit the higher echelons but have great benefits. 55K isn't entry level in higher ed - that's solidly mid-career, even in Mass. In my office, we start our entry level people (who, for the most part, have at least 2 or 3 years of experience and/or a masters degree) at 35K. After 3 years in an entry level role where I was given more and more work to do, I finally got a promotion that gives me all of 45K - which isn't even enough to rent a 1 bedroom apartment within 30 miles of the school I work for.

Most people in higher ed either have a spouse who makes more money (as it seems that you do) or are using the job for the free master's degree benefits (as I am doing). It's something you have to do because you enjoy it, rather than looking for a ton of money.

May I ask what field of higher ed you work in? The great thing about Boston is that there are many companies that sell to universities - software, books, supplies, consulting, etc. Many of my coworkers seem to start out in higher ed, get some experience and either a masters, MBA, or some technical courses under their belt, and then go work for a vendor or one of the education-focused startups in the area.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-16-2013, 09:02 AM
 
101 posts, read 74,382 times
Reputation: 119
Default re

My company basically sells to universities. The thing is there are a lot of engineers here make a lot...they don't seem to be suffering from higher ed/non-profit salary issues. The least paid people are probably myself and the admins. I get that engineering is a lucrative field though. The marketing people make good money also...my group is within marketing...it would be great to move into a higher up marketing role...but again i may end up getting typecasted as a support person if I stay here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2013, 09:57 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
16,521 posts, read 33,501,499 times
Reputation: 15259
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysium78 View Post
My company basically sells to universities. The thing is there are a lot of engineers here make a lot...they don't seem to be suffering from higher ed/non-profit salary issues. The least paid people are probably myself and the admins. I get that engineering is a lucrative field though. The marketing people make good money also...my group is within marketing...it would be great to move into a higher up marketing role...but again i may end up getting typecasted as a support person if I stay here.
Right. That's because their tech skills are in high demand with other companies. And marketing people are paid well and expected to meet and exceed set sales goals. If they don't meet them, then they get let go.

The only way for you to make more money is to add to your skill level and to be more important to your company's performance. If you aren't absolutely needed, your job will always be one of the first to be cut.

Again, talk to a career counselor and see about adding to your job skills. If you want job security or more money, you have to be proactive about adding to your skillset and knowledge in order to keep up with the job market and changing economy. You are competing with younger people who know more than you and are up to date with the latest trends in your field. You are 35 now, in ten years if you aren't careful, you'll be a dinosaur at your company and in your field.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-18-2013, 10:55 AM
 
3,943 posts, read 3,865,107 times
Reputation: 2198
Here's a few things to consider

1) Non profits are in some dire straights right now. Some people act as if they are charities and have some huge amount of funds in the bank. That's not really the case. The more specific a non profit is and the more detached so to speak the harder it will be to get funds. The Red Cross has been around for quite some time and when a disaster hits they are there. It could be a storm, earthquake, terrorist attack etc. Everyone knows about the red cross. It's pretty general. Now for a non profit trying to fight police brutality how many people can relate to that? If a non profit is specific to some disease or condition that is found in 0.000001% of the countries population how will it get funding?

2) Leading from #1 Non profits must have a business plan. Look up the article The Marketization of Non Profits. One of the authors was a professor of mine. Non profits have salaries, bills and have to have a plan. One that has made some controversial moves was the MFA. Basically a fair amount of their gallery is in Asia. They rotate this out to gain more funds, some might call it outsourcing of non profits but they still have to get funds in. Naturally they don't display everything they have since there is seasonality.

3) I would make the argument that for the most part there are few entry level non profit positions. For the most part you move up to a mid level in the private or public sector and then move over.

4) People in non profits are not exactly motivated by money. Much of the time the mission is what they are tied to. This is both good and bad. It can be good to get people perhaps to work for a bit less but it can be bad if they get stereotyped. For example I've seen on Linkedin a number of profiles where someone has performed work in non profits that when strung together paint a possible political connection/affliation. One was into secular humanism and has a photo of himself with Richard Dawkins. He lives in Atlanta (bible belt) and hasn't found full time work for years. Another worked for a PIRG group, an environmental one and I think PETA.

5) Non profits are kinda iffy on transparency. It's more open than the private sector but not as much as the public. Case in point a 990 form will tell you much about the organization. However open town meeting law does not apply meaning that they do not really have to consult the public on their actions.

"55K isn't entry level in higher ed - that's solidly mid-career, even in Mass. In my office, we start our entry level people (who, for the most part, have at least 2 or 3 years of experience and/or a masters degree) at 35K. After 3 years in an entry level role where I was given more and more work to do, I finally got a promotion that gives me all of 45K - which isn't even enough to rent a 1 bedroom apartment within 30 miles of the school I work for."

In all due respects that sounds pretty low to me. I know box store retailers that pay about 40k a year easily to just be a department manager and that's just straight hourly pay. Once you add in the OT for sundays, holidays and various bonuses it gets higher. You can pm me for some of them if you'd like. I know professors at maybe 50-60k but then that's leveled on associate, assistant etc.

"You are 35 now, in ten years if you aren't careful, you'll be a dinosaur at your company and in your field."

I would say it generally makes sense to jump every three to five years. Not so much industry but organization. If it doesn't have the possibilities to advance it makes it harder to argue to stay. Waiting for retirements might make sense in jobs that are physically demanding but if people can work in it to their 70s or 80s then it might be a long time for new openings.

I would recommend if you sell products to get a good understanding of the state procurement laws because if you can understand them in this state you can understand them in all states as Mass is the hardest. Youtube also has a fair amount of free content for various software packages. For governmental there is a large amount of online classes. FEMA has a huge list of classes, MIT courseware and the list goes on and on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 02:36 PM
 
1,218 posts, read 2,028,909 times
Reputation: 1309
$55K at 35 is too low. It's at least a good thing that you've recognized this and want to do something about it. It will be difficult to live well, raise and family (if that's what you eventually want) and save for retirement. There's some good advice on this board so far but the one piece I would reiterate is to get out of the non-profit sector. That will give you a boast to start with. I would also reiterate that making it known to your managers that you want to move up and working extra hard by taking responsibilities on that are above your level. Someone once told me to start doing the job one level above you is the surest way to get ahead.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-21-2013, 11:33 PM
 
64 posts, read 65,945 times
Reputation: 37
Are you kidding me? I have lived here on half of that salary. It is very easy to live here on $30k let alone $50k +. So find a significant other get married and double your intake. Stop worrying about your job. If you love what you do, then you'll be fine. You need to stop complaining and be happy you have a job in the first place. Learn to invest and in 20-30 years from now you'll be just fine, and you know what your just fine now to I guarantee it or your living way out of your means. Now, don't get me wrong never settle for less and always strive for more but your literally stating how do I live here on what I make, that is nonsense.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2013, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
2,535 posts, read 4,511,962 times
Reputation: 2572
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysium78 View Post
I'm 35 years old and have always lived in Boston. I currently make 51k. Not too long ago I had a job where i was making 42k and I managed. Reading other people's salaries I'm wondering if I'm just settling for less than I'm worth at this point. I work at a higher ed/non profit company and I'm in a customer support type role. I have a masters degree. I guess I went into the wrong field? I'd like to make more but once you accept a salary unless you get a big promotion within the company it's tough to get much more than a 5% raise. I once worked at a company for 6 years where i felt i put in a strong effort in trying to get ahead, trying to get promotions, but it didnt happen easily and then I got laid off. I went back to a customer support role because I feel like that's what I'm good at. I dont know where else i can go from here and I guess it's scary. I'm like ok am i going to have a salary in the 50k range for the rest of my life?? I went back and got a masters thinking it would help me...really hasn't.

I like my job, but i feel like i'm making less than i should be. It's discouraging, but getting a job these days seems so difficult. Interviewing is exhausting. I guess I'm just venting. It's just irritating seeing 22 year olds fresh out of college complaining about a salary of 55k. They dont know how lucky they are!
Do yourself a favor and take a Myers Briggs. Then read everything you can about your personality type and what positions would best fit that personality. When you are working within your strengths, you will be the most successful. The book Do What You Are is a good place to start.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2013, 11:38 PM
 
1,641 posts, read 2,205,615 times
Reputation: 694
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysium78 View Post
I'm 35 years old and have always lived in Boston. I currently make 51k. Not too long ago I had a job where i was making 42k and I managed. Reading other people's salaries I'm wondering if I'm just settling for less than I'm worth at this point. I work at a higher ed/non profit company and I'm in a customer support type role. I have a masters degree. I guess I went into the wrong field? I'd like to make more but once you accept a salary unless you get a big promotion within the company it's tough to get much more than a 5% raise. I once worked at a company for 6 years where i felt i put in a strong effort in trying to get ahead, trying to get promotions, but it didnt happen easily and then I got laid off. I went back to a customer support role because I feel like that's what I'm good at. I dont know where else i can go from here and I guess it's scary. I'm like ok am i going to have a salary in the 50k range for the rest of my life?? I went back and got a masters thinking it would help me...really hasn't.

I like my job, but i feel like i'm making less than i should be. It's discouraging, but getting a job these days seems so difficult. Interviewing is exhausting. I guess I'm just venting. It's just irritating seeing 22 year olds fresh out of college complaining about a salary of 55k. They dont know how lucky they are!
So, what is the problem? Do you need more money? Or are you just irritated that other people are making more money than you are, because I want to #$R%^T&*( everytime I see someone get a private jet and buy their private island in Hawaii.

Yeh, life is hard and you said it, exhausting and confusing. Too many variable, I said. Sometimes I wonder, why I even try? But someone a long time ago, who was smarter than me told me, she said, "Shut the **** up, you little *****. If you can't make up your mind, you don't deserve anything you wish for". Then she kissed me gently on my lips.

You see, even if you had the money, you'll always just complaint about what you don't have. Make sure you deserve what you work hard for.

I should of married that girl. I didn't, because she didn't want to move. So, don't make mistakes that you keep on regretting, no matter where you are, and who you are with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2013, 08:42 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 1,411,896 times
Reputation: 1442
Quote:
Originally Posted by elysium78 View Post
The thing is there are a lot of engineers here make a lot...they don't seem to be suffering from higher ed/non-profit salary issues.
That's because they have no choice. They have to pay them that much, or they will have no/crap engineers. They are in high demand from the private sector, and when you get down to it, are often not that easily replaceable, it takes months to get someone up to speed at a new company, that's a much bigger investment they don't want to lose. Additionally, I presume they essentially design/make the product, in which case they are the single most important people the company has. If the product is crap, no amount of sales or support talent is going to fix it in the long run.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top