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Old 10-28-2013, 04:19 PM
 
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According to the 1930 census there were about 85,000 people of "English Canadian" (i.e. excluding Quebecois who were classified separately) in Boston - more than 10% of the population and about the same size as the Italian and Jewish populations. Most of them were from the Maritime provinces. Boston was arguably the second largest "Maritime" city after Halifax at that time. Certainly on the Canadian side of the border, Boston is often seen as the "big city" and they are big fans of the Boston Bruins and Boston Red Sox.

Yet Canadians aren't really thought of an immigrant group and there isn't really much material about them. Did they settle in any particular areas? Most of them were Protestant but I assume a significant number - perhaps 1/4 would have been Catholic. Did the Protestant Maritime Canadians melt in with New England Yankees or did they retain a separate identity? Did the Irish Catholic Maritimers orient towards the Irish community in Boston?
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Old 10-28-2013, 04:31 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
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Well, my great grandmother was born in Nova Scotia and came here as a teenager. I guess what happened is she married an American and "melted in", as you say.
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Old 10-28-2013, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
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I know and have met quite a few people around here with ancestry from PEI, Nova Scotia. Some still have very proud identity with Scottish culture. Some consider themselves Scotch Irish same as the Scotch Irish in other parts of the United States. They don't seem to differentiate Canadian Scot from European Scot as French-Canadians distinguish themselves from European French. Many French and Scottish Canadians landed in Maine before moving on to Boston and consider themselves proud Mainers as well.

Somerville is an area where many Scotch Canadians landed.
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Old 10-28-2013, 06:42 PM
 
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Count me as another person who has ancestry from the Maritime provinces. My maternal grandmother's family came from Nova Scotia and settled in Roxbury back in the early 1900s.

What I find interesting is that I can hit it off with total strangers of Canadian descent without even trying. My other three ancestral lines are 100% Irish American and yet I have always had more difficulty make friends with Irish Americans.
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Old 10-28-2013, 07:34 PM
 
Location: a bar
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All four of my grandparents where born/raised in Canada (of Irish/Scot decent and Protestant). Father's parents were from New Brunswick and mother's parents were from Newfoundland. They relocated to the Boston area in the early 1900's settling in Chelsea and Somerville. East Boston also had a large Canadian immigrant population at the time I believe.

I still have a lot of family up in New Brunswick (St Stephen area) and have been up there a number of times. And yes they are both Bruins and Red Sox fans. Culturally speaking, I don't think there was enough of a difference to set them apart from the established population so they probably melted right in.
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Old 10-28-2013, 08:17 PM
 
Location: New London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseyB View Post
Well, my great grandmother was born in Nova Scotia and came here as a teenager. I guess what happened is she married an American and "melted in", as you say.
Same.

My great grandfather was from Nova Scotia and came down to MA where he married an Irish woman. Their son married an Irish woman, and their daughter married an Irish man.
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Old 10-30-2013, 03:42 PM
 
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Interesting. Altogether the Maritimers might have outnumbered the Yankees by 1930.

Assimilation occurred rather quickly obviously and that's not surprising given that in a lot of ways Maritime Canadian immigration was more akin to drawing from the "hinterlands" than overseas immigration (just as Detroit drew upon southwestern Ontario). Still I wonder if there may have been a class difference, because it seems that the Yankees remaining in Boston were largely "Boston Brahmins"; most had moved out of the working class or out of the city altogether.

One thing to note is that Irish immigration pretty much stopped after the Famine years in the Maritimes, while in Boston most came well after the Famine and continued to immigrate to Boston in large numbers into the 1920's. Still I assume there must have been a lot of Maritime Irish Catholic/Boston Irish marriages.
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Old 10-30-2013, 06:29 PM
 
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My hat is off to Canada as I believe that more, if not all countries should be like them. Not trying to rule the world, take care of thier people's health, not out starting wars etc. No place is perfect, but this came to mind recently to me and thought I would share this as I was reading this post.
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Old 10-31-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Massachusetts
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Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Interesting. Altogether the Maritimers might have outnumbered the Yankees by 1930.

Assimilation occurred rather quickly obviously and that's not surprising given that in a lot of ways Maritime Canadian immigration was more akin to drawing from the "hinterlands" than overseas immigration (just as Detroit drew upon southwestern Ontario). Still I wonder if there may have been a class difference, because it seems that the Yankees remaining in Boston were largely "Boston Brahmins"; most had moved out of the working class or out of the city altogether.

One thing to note is that Irish immigration pretty much stopped after the Famine years in the Maritimes, while in Boston most came well after the Famine and continued to immigrate to Boston in large numbers into the 1920's. Still I assume there must have been a lot of Maritime Irish Catholic/Boston Irish marriages.

The Maritimers were unable to keep up the seafaring culture once they arrived in the United States, likely due to the English Yankee stronghold on shipping and the Portuguese stronghold on the fishing industry. The Maritimers had to go inland and take manufacturing work in Massachusetts rather than live on the coast, which led to greater intermingling with other groups. The French Canadians were able to continue working in forestry in Maine and keep their cultural identity intact better than the Maritimers, in part because of this.
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