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Old 01-02-2014, 05:58 PM
 
Location: New London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadameMerle View Post
with a fairly astonishing number of single family home neighborhoods very close to the inner core (astonishing to me at least, as a Londoner!).
This is probably the big thing. Boston's suburbs aren't necessarily not dense, but they have single family houses rather than attached houses, so that a Boston suburb looks like this whereas a London suburb might look like this .

I think I blame the 1950s.......

However.....

Quote:
outer London borough (considered suburban-ish and low density by most Londoners) which seems to have a density on par with inner Boston neighborhoods to me.
I find it hard to believe that London has suburbs that look like this.... (If they exist, please show a picture )


Streets of the North End by garreyf, on Flickr
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Old 01-02-2014, 06:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
This is probably the big thing. Boston's suburbs aren't necessarily not dense, but they have single family houses rather than attached houses, so that a Boston suburb looks like this whereas a London suburb might look like this .

I think I blame the 1950s.......

However.....



I find it hard to believe that London has suburbs that look like this.... (If they exist, please show a picture )


Streets of the North End by garreyf, on Flickr
I just looked it up and their borough has a density of 13,000 per sq mile. I lived in an inner borough, Tower Hamlets, where the density is 34,000 per sq mile (according to wikipedia).

The North End is tiny; there are certainly areas of Redbridge that are extremely dense (large apartmtment buildings etc) but it is a mixture of terraced houses, semis and apartment blocks as well as a lot of green space (including Hainault Forest).

Last edited by MadameMerle; 01-02-2014 at 06:50 PM..
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Old 01-02-2014, 06:20 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
This is probably the big thing. Boston's suburbs aren't necessarily not dense, but they have single family houses rather than attached houses, so that a Boston suburb looks like this whereas a London suburb might look like this .
Your example (Everett) is probably not that different in density from outer London suburbs. Go a bit further out by the 128 corridor and it is less dense almost all of London.
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Old 01-02-2014, 06:32 PM
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Location: Western Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by professeurpablo View Post
Yes, that article was interesting to me too. It was in New Geography. That said, the differing structure and organization of urban areas in the US, particularly after the suburban and highway boom of the 1950s, really redefined what we consider urban areas to be. If you were to count only the inner suburbs of Boston, say inside 128, I would imagine the results of the survey in that article would be quite different. Here is the article for those who are interested:

World Urban Areas Population and Density: A 2012 Update | Newgeography.com
Overall, the density of the Boston urban area (showed by the map I added in the previous page) has a very low average density. However, a significant portion of the population lives at much higher densities, while much of the Boston urban area contains few people. One way around that is weighted density, where census tracts get weighted by the number of people they contain in computing the average. Boston ranks fairly high for American standards by this measure:

Density calculations for U.S. urbanized areas, weighted by census tract - Austin Contrarian

Or you could graph the densities at which people live for the entire urban area.

Density calculations for U.S. urbanized areas, weighted by census tract - Austin Contrarian

Boston has a dense center, but outer regions like Atlanta.
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Old 01-02-2014, 06:41 PM
 
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I like the weighted rank, thanks for that. It seems to align more closley with my mental sense of US density.

To compare internationally, of course, we'd need to recalculate those...

Belated thanks to professeurpablo for the New Geography link.
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Old 01-02-2014, 09:24 PM
 
Location: New London
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Go a bit further out by the 128 corridor and it is less dense almost all of London.
Well, theoretically, if you go far enough, you could get this or this , but point taken.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Density calculations for U.S. urbanized areas, weighted by census tract - Austin Contrarian
Or you could graph the densities at which people live for the entire urban area.
Density calculations for U.S. urbanized areas, weighted by census tract - Austin Contrarian
Boston has a dense center, but outer regions like Atlanta.
I don't know if I agree with Honolulu and San Jose being so high on their lists....

Or at least I don't know if many people would say that Honolulu feels denser than Chicago, or San Jose feels denser than Boston.Would they?
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:15 PM
 
Location: south central
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey92 View Post
Population-weighted Density by Distances from City Hall
That link is showing that at 25 miles out from city hall Boston has a higher density than NYC and only second to LA somehow
Lowell and Lawrence are both approximately 25 miles away from Boston City Hall.
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Old 01-16-2014, 04:19 PM
 
Location: south central
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadameMerle View Post
I remember reading somewhere that Boston and Atlanta are the two least dense urban areas with populations over 2 mil in the world. I can't find the article I read it in right now, though...but will update if I do.

Purely anecdotally, my parents are from an outer London borough (considered suburban-ish and low density by most Londoners) which seems to have a density on par with inner Boston neighborhoods to me. This is a low rise city for the most part, with a fairly astonishing number of single family home neighborhoods very close to the inner core (astonishing to me at least, as a Londoner!).
MadameMerle, here is a list of the largest urban areas in the world http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...59568121,d.cGU

It lists by population, and shows density and land area covered. If you look at these statistics, what stands out? Look at the land areas and densities of American cities and compare them to any other nation.

Edit: I see someone else posted the article. This is a link to the full list, which I guess will just amplify the differences further between American cities and the rest.
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