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Old 06-01-2017, 02:55 PM
 
8,637 posts, read 8,771,906 times
Reputation: 5185

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I saw a "meet Bran Scalabrine!!!" ad in the metro...A white bum who never contributed anything and last played for us ten years ago. I also see lots of Olynyk gear calling him the new king. When he is probably only the 3rd or 4th best player on the team.

Boston does not embrace black athletes in nearly the same fashion as they do white athletes, if you think so your probably only thinking of Big Papi.
Brian Scalabrine is s broadcaster now so yes he has isn't your typical bum from
10 years ago.

Pierce is still beloved around here, Garnett as well. Mookie Betts is probably the most popular Red Sox player right now.
On the flip side Buckholz was probably the least liked player in Boston last year. A White Cy Young winning pitcher is being **** on by literally everyone.

Actually how hard fans are on a team is inversely proportional to their whiteness.
Celtics fans are by far the most positive, then Pats fans then a huge gap Red Sox then Nruins fans are literally never happy with their team. Now I think that it more to do with the culture surrounding those teams and leagues than race but still.
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Old 06-01-2017, 06:28 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
3,961 posts, read 1,936,696 times
Reputation: 2440
i am haitian-american and i grew up in boston. someone upthread mentioned that west-indians tend to like boston and african-americans tend to hate it; that seems about rite. i dont suffer from caucasian guilt so i doesnt bug me when people call my city the most racist city. what does sting a bit was when i went away to college one of my african-american friends would call me the white boy. i feel like i would be called an uncle tom if i ignored some of the racial tensions that happen in this city. there are significant socio-economic disparities among access to healthcare, education, banking, real-estate, jobs, ... and the proportion of people in lower income parts of the city tend to be minorities. according to a study by the atlantic, boston was #6 in the country for zipcodes with the least racial integration -- chicago was #1; i believe n.y.c. was #2 (i cant find the thread rite now). which surprises me because people always see n.y.c. as the quintessential melting pot (according to city-data, bostons black population percentage is about 1% higher than n.y.c.). surprisingly, many cities in the south had the best racial integration.

what i suspect is a bit of confirmation bias is that when a racial incident occurs is boston, it proves what people been thinking all along. however when racial controversies happen in other cities, it doesnt define the city as much.
things like jena-6, stop-and-frisk, 3-strikes laws, arizona sb-1070, sean bell, amidou diallo, abner luima, eric garner, laquan mcdonald, tamir rice, fergusson, baltimore riots, donald trump, lebrons l.a. house, ... i feel like the nypd is the new lapd.

i notice with the fenway fans n-dropping on adam jones, a lot of people defaulted to bostons-mad-racist. (i find it annoying that people characterize this episode as a few bad apples; the premise no one else in the section cared. and the whole stadium was singing "sweet caroline" by the 7th inning).

Last edited by stanley-88888888; 06-01-2017 at 07:09 PM..
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Old 06-02-2017, 04:29 AM
 
Location: Montreal
114 posts, read 64,669 times
Reputation: 136
Stanley, I commiserate with you on the fate of AA's for like ever. Only problem I have is with the N-word thing. Whatever the context, this expression has become
fraught with meaninglessness, not the other way around for rather obvious reasons. When people in the black community quit dropping the word on themselves, we can talk.
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Old 06-02-2017, 09:20 AM
 
44,548 posts, read 43,091,728 times
Reputation: 14373
Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
i am haitian-american and i grew up in boston. someone upthread mentioned that west-indians tend to like boston and african-americans tend to hate it; that seems about rite. i dont suffer from caucasian guilt so i doesnt bug me when people call my city the most racist city. what does sting a bit was when i went away to college one of my african-american friends would call me the white boy. i feel like i would be called an uncle tom if i ignored some of the racial tensions that happen in this city. there are significant socio-economic disparities among access to healthcare, education, banking, real-estate, jobs, ... and the proportion of people in lower income parts of the city tend to be minorities. according to a study by the atlantic, boston was #6 in the country for zipcodes with the least racial integration -- chicago was #1; i believe n.y.c. was #2 (i cant find the thread rite now). which surprises me because people always see n.y.c. as the quintessential melting pot (according to city-data, bostons black population percentage is about 1% higher than n.y.c.). surprisingly, many cities in the south had the best racial integration.

what i suspect is a bit of confirmation bias is that when a racial incident occurs is boston, it proves what people been thinking all along. however when racial controversies happen in other cities, it doesnt define the city as much.
things like jena-6, stop-and-frisk, 3-strikes laws, arizona sb-1070, sean bell, amidou diallo, abner luima, eric garner, laquan mcdonald, tamir rice, fergusson, baltimore riots, donald trump, lebrons l.a. house, ... i feel like the nypd is the new lapd.

i notice with the fenway fans n-dropping on adam jones, a lot of people defaulted to bostons-mad-racist. (i find it annoying that people characterize this episode as a few bad apples; the premise no one else in the section cared. and the whole stadium was singing "sweet caroline" by the 7th inning).
Hello stanley-88888888. I am the one who mentioned that West Indians and Africans tended to have better reviews of Boston than African-Americans. I am merely going off of the experiences in my life. To clear things up, I've never been to Boston. What I know of Boston comes from what I have read in magazines, encyclopedias, and from what I've heard. Growing up, I never heard much that was nice about Boston, particularly in the category of racism. For what it's worth, I did meet a few Haitian-Americans who were raised in the Boston area and lived in the Atlanta area. They never had a bad thing to say about Boston. According to them, any racism they dealt with was in the South.

Now, for the South, I can agree about what they experienced. I live in the suburbs of Atlanta and I've dealt with racism. I've had to deal with being called the "N"word alot. I've dealt with rednecks in high school who made comments like "I'm gonna hang you by the end of my rope". One kid said "go pick my cotton" before proceeding to call me the "N" word. And in the South, the Confederate flag is a big issue here.

However, with Boston, when my Haitian friends said positive things about Boston, I was taken aback. Everything I ever heard about Boston, and have continued to hear was about the racism against Blacks in that city. Basically, nothing nice. I've never been, so I have no idea what experiences I would have. What I know is that what I've heard from American Blacks vs Blacks of foreign background have been markedly different. And I'm not going to call anyone "Uncle Tom" or "White Boy" for that. I just figure that Blacks of immigrant background have a different(although in someways similar) experience in America than Black Americans do.

I do notice this about the most segregated zip codes. They are in the most densely populated areas, and places where people have been living there since day one of America. And I have this to tell you. In the Atlanta area, we have our somewhat segregated areas. Atlanta had alot of "white flight" during the 70s. There are many suburbs in Atlanta that have gone from majority-White to majority-Black within 10 years. Some suburbs are about 90% Black. I think one big factor in the South is this. With Boston, there has been alot of gentrification, so alot of poorer Whites had to leave. Boston is also markedly expensive compared to Atlanta. Atlanta is undergoing alot of gentrification, and has become more expensive, but not like Boston. I also notice that compared to New England, there are a higher percentage of working class and poorer Whites in the South. In some ways, integration and segregation occur on economic lines.

As for being called "white boy" and "uncle tom", I've been called those terms by some White people. In my case, it had nothing to do with your situation. It was me being a "non-stereotypical African-American". Alot of "you're the Whitest Black guy I know" comments or the "Carlton Banks" comments have come from Whites. I've gotten some similar comments from Blacks. However, it would often shock me when some White people made comments like that.
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Old 06-03-2017, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Boston
5 posts, read 5,743 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite_heights77 View Post
I'm from Baltimore and we do have our own set of racial problems, agitators and collaborators. But, it seems that Boston is historically nefarious for its racist nature more than any other city I've encountered.

I remember hearing a friend of mine from Dorchester who once stated, "In South Boston (Southies) don't like f*&&n anybody: Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Italians and even other whites who are not from South Boston!!! It's been like that since I was a kids and it remains so to this very day!" LOL
I didn't read this thread but saw this comment (above). I moved to Southie recently and I'd have to say that quote is pretty accurate.
For reference, I grew up in rural MD (Harford Co), lived in Baltimore (city), Northern CA, NYC (for the last 17 years), and now Boston. I was pretty shocked by how racist some of the people are (comments in bars, mostly). It's the kind of stuff I heard as a kid in white-bread MD, but that was in the 70's. Granted, I only go to dive bars, but the townies are pretty racist- probably the worst I've ever encountered. Coming from NYC, it seems strange because NYC was pretty much the opposite.
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Old 06-03-2017, 06:11 PM
 
42 posts, read 26,470 times
Reputation: 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Brian Scalabrine is s broadcaster now so yes he has isn't your typical bum from
10 years ago.

Pierce is still beloved around here, Garnett as well. Mookie Betts is probably the most popular Red Sox player right now.
On the flip side Buckholz was probably the least liked player in Boston last year. A White Cy Young winning pitcher is being **** on by literally everyone.

Actually how hard fans are on a team is inversely proportional to their whiteness.
Celtics fans are by far the most positive, then Pats fans then a huge gap Red Sox then Nruins fans are literally never happy with their team. Now I think that it more to do with the culture surrounding those teams and leagues than race but still.
I think the point is that people went out of their way to recognize Brian Scalabrine beyond most players of his caliber in Boston. Most broadcasters who are ex-NBA players tend to have had a decent career, Scalabrine averaged 3 ppg.

In San Antonio, we have a similar situation with another redhead ex-player, Matt Bonner. However, he shot 40% from 3 and even had shoe deals with Adidas and New Balance.
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Old 06-04-2017, 08:46 AM
 
5,292 posts, read 5,272,940 times
Reputation: 1100
Stanley,

Thanks for your input! This reading is very interesting and I'd like to respond. I'm an African American who was partially raised by West Indian grandparents. I want to further build on what you've expressed. There is some truism to what you speak, but these dynamics need to flushed out and expanded so we can comprehend. Like I said, I'm an intelligent AA who's been called white because I don't live up to their distorted and perverted optics of what I should be in their eyes - like them!

For those who called you an Uncle Tom, really don't have a true/genuine historical understanding of who and what Uncle Tom was all about. More on this later...


Quote:
Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
i am haitian-american and i grew up in boston. someone upthread mentioned that west-indians tend to like boston and african-americans tend to hate it; that seems about rite. i dont suffer from caucasian guilt so i doesnt bug me when people call my city the most racist city. what does sting a bit was when i went away to college one of my african-american friends would call me the white boy. i feel like i would be called an uncle tom if i ignored some of the racial tensions that happen in this city. there are significant socio-economic disparities among access to healthcare, education, banking, real-estate, jobs, ... and the proportion of people in lower income parts of the city tend to be minorities. according to a study by the atlantic, boston was #6 in the country for zipcodes with the least racial integration -- chicago was #1; i believe n.y.c. was #2 (i cant find the thread rite now). which surprises me because people always see n.y.c. as the quintessential melting pot (according to city-data, bostons black population percentage is about 1% higher than n.y.c.). surprisingly, many cities in the south had the best racial integration.

what i suspect is a bit of confirmation bias is that when a racial incident occurs is boston, it proves what people been thinking all along. however when racial controversies happen in other cities, it doesnt define the city as much.
things like jena-6, stop-and-frisk, 3-strikes laws, arizona sb-1070, sean bell, amidou diallo, abner luima, eric garner, laquan mcdonald, tamir rice, fergusson, baltimore riots, donald trump, lebrons l.a. house, ... i feel like the nypd is the new lapd.

i notice with the fenway fans n-dropping on adam jones, a lot of people defaulted to bostons-mad-racist. (i find it annoying that people characterize this episode as a few bad apples; the premise no one else in the section cared. and the whole stadium was singing "sweet caroline" by the 7th inning).
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Old 06-04-2017, 08:51 AM
 
5,292 posts, read 5,272,940 times
Reputation: 1100
We need to talk! I graduated from Joppatowne High School (Harford Co) class of 1987. When you say rural, like Churchville or Fallston, MD rural? Harford County is quickly becoming developed.

Maryland is an interesting place! I'd like to speak to you about your time in the state?



Quote:
Originally Posted by broadwayron View Post
I didn't read this thread but saw this comment (above). I moved to Southie recently and I'd have to say that quote is pretty accurate.
For reference, I grew up in rural MD (Harford Co), lived in Baltimore (city), Northern CA, NYC (for the last 17 years), and now Boston. I was pretty shocked by how racist some of the people are (comments in bars, mostly). It's the kind of stuff I heard as a kid in white-bread MD, but that was in the 70's. Granted, I only go to dive bars, but the townies are pretty racist- probably the worst I've ever encountered. Coming from NYC, it seems strange because NYC was pretty much the opposite.
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Old 06-13-2017, 08:09 PM
 
44,548 posts, read 43,091,728 times
Reputation: 14373
Quote:
Originally Posted by broadwayron View Post
I didn't read this thread but saw this comment (above). I moved to Southie recently and I'd have to say that quote is pretty accurate.
For reference, I grew up in rural MD (Harford Co), lived in Baltimore (city), Northern CA, NYC (for the last 17 years), and now Boston. I was pretty shocked by how racist some of the people are (comments in bars, mostly). It's the kind of stuff I heard as a kid in white-bread MD, but that was in the 70's. Granted, I only go to dive bars, but the townies are pretty racist- probably the worst I've ever encountered. Coming from NYC, it seems strange because NYC was pretty much the opposite.
It is like some people still maintain that nutty mentality. As for why this is persisting in Southie, I still don't know.
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Old 06-16-2017, 07:01 AM
 
422 posts, read 175,091 times
Reputation: 218
Quote:
Originally Posted by green_mariner View Post
It is like some people still maintain that nutty mentality. As for why this is persisting in Southie, I still don't know.
Many people who were born and raise in "Southie" Boston still live there .They will always carry a grudge and pass it on down to family members about the forced busing back in the 70's,always.
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