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Old 06-09-2017, 12:42 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
3,967 posts, read 1,938,119 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
poutine
is it me, or does that sound like a euphemism for something ?
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Old 06-09-2017, 12:48 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,527,617 times
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As has been mentioned, it started as the common type of simple regional rivalry that almost every city everywhere has with a neighbor. In the 17th - early 19th centuries both cities were on a more or less level playing field and both cities shared the emergent country's bedrock of intellectual, economic and cultural life.

By the end of the 19th century, New York's economy developed enormously, and I doubt Boston didn't feel a certain hit to the ego. Meanwhile, supercilious New Yorkers see Boston as quaint.

Today the rivalry is mostly about baseball though. The few that have genuine nasty reactions to the other city are usually emotionally stunted or low IQ people who use the rivalry to inflate their own ego or sense of self worth.

I was born and raise in New York and once you get past the subject of baseball, most people I have heard express an opinion on Boston were pretty positive, especially compared to how I have heard people talk about other cities, more so even the farther you get from the Northeast.

But outside baseball, the rivalry is much like Cleveland-Cincinnati, Portland-Seattle, LA-San Francisco, and so on. Maybe even less contentious than those. Boston and New York have been together for a long time. Both watched the whole country develop, and in many ways I think they see themselves (and the northeast in general) as very different from the rest of the country.
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Old 06-09-2017, 01:48 PM
 
8,640 posts, read 8,775,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
poutine
What exactly do you think soggy French Fries was suppose to be?
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Old 06-09-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Montreal
114 posts, read 64,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
What exactly do you think soggy French Fries was suppose to be?
Poutine in french also refers to Putin (homonym), your supreme leader via his VP Trump, your Grand Poobah. If you eat enough of that stuff, you'll end up gassing your entourage like the old Boston Baked Bean controversy of old.

Insofar as the French spoken here is fake, Massachussets isn't anymore pure English than Quebec is French, so what's your beef?
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Old 06-10-2017, 05:36 AM
 
8,640 posts, read 8,775,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BOORGONG View Post
Poutine in french also refers to Putin (homonym), your supreme leader via his VP Trump, your Grand Poobah. If you eat enough of that stuff, you'll end up gassing your entourage like the old Boston Baked Bean controversy of old.

Insofar as the French spoken here is fake, Massachussets isn't anymore pure English than Quebec is French, so what's your beef?
The first 2 points were jokes, I stand by the last one though.
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Old 06-12-2017, 06:00 AM
 
32,716 posts, read 22,666,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
What exactly do you think soggy French Fries was suppose to be?


Anyone who gets a nice serving of poutine and thinks "soggy French fries" is in need of professional help.
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Old 06-14-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: New London
1,671 posts, read 1,738,691 times
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Wild thought I had recently:

The folks who settled MA (the Pilgrims) had lived in Holland for a few years prior to making the trip across the sea. They ultimately decided that they would rather brave the New World than keep living in the Netherlands.

Do you think the fact that NY was first settled by the Dutch would've put the two areas somewhat at odds with each other even right after their founding because of the Pilgrims' history with the Dutch?

Probably not. Again it's just a crazy thought.
(Also apologies if someone's already shared a similar thought. I didn't read the entire thread before posting)
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Old 06-14-2017, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,854 posts, read 6,808,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iAMtheVVALRUS View Post
Wild thought I had recently:

The folks who settled MA (the Pilgrims) had lived in Holland for a few years prior to making the trip across the sea. They ultimately decided that they would rather brave the New World than keep living in the Netherlands.

Do you think the fact that NY was first settled by the Dutch would've put the two areas somewhat at odds with each other even right after their founding because of the Pilgrims' history with the Dutch?

Probably not. Again it's just a crazy thought.
(Also apologies if someone's already shared a similar thought. I didn't read the entire thread before posting)
Well the pilgrims and Dutch were very different. The Dutch were quite into free enterprise internationally, whereas the pilgrims were very strictly religious, somewhat utopian. Shared very little in common. BUT the pilgrims left the Netherlands due to the coming end of the Dutch-Spanish "12 Years' Truce." The Pilgrims likely wanted to not mess around with a possible Spanish takeover during the Inquisition. So I don't think it was the case that they got to the Netherlands and thought "we hate this way of life and these people" (not anymore than most Puritans said that of anyone else at least), but rather it was necessity.
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Old 07-03-2017, 02:21 PM
 
5,292 posts, read 5,274,340 times
Reputation: 1100
Quote:
I was born and raise in New York and once you get past the subject of baseball, most people I have heard express an opinion on Boston were pretty positive, especially compared to how I have heard people talk about other cities, more so even the farther you get from the Northeast.
*The city of Baltimore gave the New York Yankees, Babe Ruth!




Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
As has been mentioned, it started as the common type of simple regional rivalry that almost every city everywhere has with a neighbor. In the 17th - early 19th centuries both cities were on a more or less level playing field and both cities shared the emergent country's bedrock of intellectual, economic and cultural life.

By the end of the 19th century, New York's economy developed enormously, and I doubt Boston didn't feel a certain hit to the ego. Meanwhile, supercilious New Yorkers see Boston as quaint.

Today the rivalry is mostly about baseball though. The few that have genuine nasty reactions to the other city are usually emotionally stunted or low IQ people who use the rivalry to inflate their own ego or sense of self worth.

I was born and raise in New York and once you get past the subject of baseball, most people I have heard express an opinion on Boston were pretty positive, especially compared to how I have heard people talk about other cities, more so even the farther you get from the Northeast.

But outside baseball, the rivalry is much like Cleveland-Cincinnati, Portland-Seattle, LA-San Francisco, and so on. Maybe even less contentious than those. Boston and New York have been together for a long time. Both watched the whole country develop, and in many ways I think they see themselves (and the northeast in general) as very different from the rest of the country.
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Old 07-03-2017, 09:30 PM
 
8,640 posts, read 8,775,115 times
Reputation: 5185
It was a hot summers day in 1776, 12 Colonies stood up to the might of the British Empire and New Yorkers, well they didn't, and we haven't got along ever since.
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