U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-11-2017, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Conway, SC
69 posts, read 69,629 times
Reputation: 68

Advertisements

Good Lord.

I currently make approximately $37/$38k/year as a licensed social worker in South Carolina. I live with two very good friends who live in their grandparents' old house, and so there is no rent, just my 1/3 of utilities and any household repairs and renovations they/we decide to do. This has been very helpful in saving for my future goals, including getting the next stage of social work license I need to be able to work independently, and moving elsewhere.

Is it really that necessary to make near $100k or more to live in the Boston area? I know most jobs pay much better up North than here in the South, but I'm pretty confident that even there, certain career fields, like teachers and social workers, are underpaid. How do they survive?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-11-2017, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,899 posts, read 6,832,090 times
Reputation: 6630
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadly View Post
Good Lord.

I currently make approximately $37/$38k/year as a licensed social worker in South Carolina. I live with two very good friends who live in their grandparents' old house, and so there is no rent, just my 1/3 of utilities and any household repairs and renovations they/we decide to do. This has been very helpful in saving for my future goals, including getting the next stage of social work license I need to be able to work independently, and moving elsewhere.

Is it really that necessary to make near $100k or more to live in the Boston area? I know most jobs pay much better up North than here in the South, but I'm pretty confident that even there, certain career fields, like teachers and social workers, are underpaid. How do they survive?
Ehhh this board is very wealthy. Take it with a grain of salt.

But to answer some concerns: roommates until mid 30s and no car are common.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2017, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Conway, SC
69 posts, read 69,629 times
Reputation: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjimmy24 View Post
Ehhh this board is very wealthy. Take it with a grain of salt.

But to answer some concerns: roommates until mid 30s and no car are common.
Great. Seeing as how I've pretty much accepted the fact that I'll probably have roommates until I'm married (as a social worker I'll never be able to afford to be a one-income home pretty much anywhere lol), and not having to have a car is a factor of wanting to move up North, I can work with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 12:50 AM
 
Location: New England
1,936 posts, read 1,074,088 times
Reputation: 1690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chadly View Post
Good Lord.

I currently make approximately $37/$38k/year as a licensed social worker in South Carolina. I live with two very good friends who live in their grandparents' old house, and so there is no rent, just my 1/3 of utilities and any household repairs and renovations they/we decide to do. This has been very helpful in saving for my future goals, including getting the next stage of social work license I need to be able to work independently, and moving elsewhere.

Is it really that necessary to make near $100k or more to live in the Boston area? I know most jobs pay much better up North than here in the South, but I'm pretty confident that even there, certain career fields, like teachers and social workers, are underpaid. How do they survive?
Nope, not at all. Lots of people on here are snobby. You don't have to live in a single family home in a top school district. It takes six figures to live in a rich town with kids and cars. There are a number of people who live on 40k a year with roommates and do just fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 04:39 AM
 
2,771 posts, read 2,216,535 times
Reputation: 2174
Quote:
Originally Posted by tysmith95 View Post
Nope, not at all. Lots of people on here are snobby. You don't have to live in a single family home in a top school district. It takes six figures to live in a rich town with kids and cars. There are a number of people who live on 40k a year with roommates and do just fine.
You kind of proved the point without realizing it. A family with 2 adults needs close to $80k to live decently. Each kid probably costs at least $5k/year (add $15k+/year for daycare). That's almost $90k with 2 kids but then you have to a find a place to live (without roommates) which is really where families get totally screwed today. Even a town with average schools has a buy in of $300k+.

If you want to live in a "rich town" with cars you need much more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 06:11 AM
 
487 posts, read 361,828 times
Reputation: 801
Even decidedly lower middle class lifestyle in Boston requires fairly high income, let alone living it up. Small two bedroom apartment any place where one can get to the T before their hair turns gray and doesn't need to wear a bulletproof vest on a daily basis will be at least $2000. A newer financed non-luxury car will be $600 or more once payments, insurance, gas and possibly parking are factored in. Cell phone and cable would be another $200. Throw in student loans and credit card payments everyone has nowadays, add food, and that's another $1000 - there goes the entire take-home portion of $75,000 salary and we haven't even gotten to things like saving, going out and all the other good stuff.

Bump it up a notch, switch that public housing style brick box or triple-decker that hasn't been renovated since 1960s for one of those new construction IKEA showrooms, replace that Camry with L-badged Camry, get all those extra channels you'll never watch and you're looking at eating ramen while making $100k.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dm84 View Post
You kind of proved the point without realizing it. A family with 2 adults needs close to $80k to live decently. Each kid probably costs at least $5k/year (add $15k+/year for daycare). That's almost $90k with 2 kids but then you have to a find a place to live (without roommates) which is really where families get totally screwed today. Even a town with average schools has a buy in of $300k+.

If you want to live in a "rich town" with cars you need much more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 06:40 AM
 
32,778 posts, read 22,726,695 times
Reputation: 29800
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigfatdude View Post
Even decidedly lower middle class lifestyle in Boston requires fairly high income, let alone living it up. Small two bedroom apartment any place where one can get to the T before their hair turns gray and doesn't need to wear a bulletproof vest on a daily basis will be at least $2000.


Stop this insanity. Two people I know just rented in Somerville. One right near Porter. One a couple of blocks from downtown Davis Sq. Safe. Nice places. Two bedrooms. Under $2000 a month.


Loads of people don't have cable (or even TVs). If they have a car, they paid cash for a used one. And no, not everyone has CC payments. People largely seem to pay it off every month and just ride them for the points and to help travel cheap (like with the Chase Sapphire).


This board is so prone to over exaggeration it isn't' funny.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 06:47 AM
 
1,390 posts, read 1,959,501 times
Reputation: 1547
Lets not confuse income and wealth.

There are plenty of people I have met in the metro area that a very smart that work for non-profits and mission based entities. Boston is a Hub for these types of jobs which skew the income down. Yet these folks have some amazing work/life balance compared to the corpatists.

Dig a little deeper through and you will find some generational wealth is enabling them to peruse these fulfilling career. I don't want to turn this into a have vs. have not discussion. I hope one day I can make investments in my children (education, help with down payment) that allows them to live this way.

I also have been a big follower of financial independence forums and most millionaires in this circle try to keep their incomes as low as possible to get tax breaks (no capital gains if income is less than $75k) or Obamacare subsidies.

$100k to rent of do an FHA loan in Metro Boston for a family of 5 is tight, IMO. $100k with a hefty down payment on a home and both sets of grandparents living near by to help with the kids is a different story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 06:50 AM
 
32,778 posts, read 22,726,695 times
Reputation: 29800
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston_Burbs View Post
Dig a little deeper through and you will find some generational wealth is enabling them to peruse these fulfilling career. .


Funny, none of the people I know in social work, or at the aquarium, or museums, or working on social justice issues, have any money from family. Their families, what's left of them, don't have crud to give.


Sure, some people in these fields do. Some people in every field does. It's a minority though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-12-2017, 06:56 AM
 
1,390 posts, read 1,959,501 times
Reputation: 1547
Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
Funny, none of the people I know in social work, or at the aquarium, or museums, or working on social justice issues, have any money from family. Their families, what's left of them, don't have crud to give.


Sure, some people in these fields do. Some people in every field does. It's a minority though.
I should re-phrase.

In the High income, top public school town I live in, those who work in the non-profit world (and I have met alot of them, though mostly married women) have wealth from outside their W2 earnings, which drives down the "average family income" metric.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Massachusetts > Boston
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top