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Old 07-06-2017, 10:39 AM
 
1,691 posts, read 3,213,438 times
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Here's an enthusiastic overview someone posted on another website-- I dunno, might be helpful...

Boston is a great town. Almost every place is walkable, if you pick a place anyway near the T you'll be absolutely fine without a car. I gave up mine ten years ago and I've never regretted it.
Housing IS expensive but there are plenty of places outside of the downtown core that are still relatively affordable. I wouldn't live in Waltham or god forbid Framingham to save my life. Those areas are a good long drive into the city center and are basically straight suburbs. (and yes Moody St in Waltham is... fine.)
Jamaica Plain is beautiful, lots of green space and large parks. The population skews towards progressive with a couple of built up commercial areas with coffee shops and restaurants, banks ect. Basically a friendly safe neighborhood. It's also rapidly yuppifing and growing more and more expensive. Areas in Dorchester, which has a lingering seedy reputation amonst those who pretty much know nothing about it, is in certain areas gentrifying at a quick pace. The Savin Hill area in Dorchester is a ten minute T ride from downtown has a beach and is a diverse and lovely neighborhood. A little further out is Ashmont. Same as Savin Hill with a bit more night time shenanigans but basically a good place to live. Lower Mills is even further out but is really just like living in an old time New England mill town. It's quiet and quaint. I wouldn't recommend East Boston. I lived there for years and with the closeness of the airport it is the loudest neighborhood ever. It does have a large population of Central Americans so the food there is outrageously good and cheap. I miss that. Brighton Center is just fine, quiet, has all the little shops you'd need to get by, pharmacy, banks, bars, places to catch a bite. Allston and Mission Hill are the epicenters for our undergrad student populations. Allston is fun but can be loud and surprisingly expensive. Somerville and Cambridge are very popular. They will be your most expensive bets. I tend to find them a bit boring personally. There's a certain lack of economic diversity. Mostly a lot of transplants with high paying jobs living in housing stock that should be nicer for what they are paying.
There are no areas in the whole of our metro region that even come close to the bad areas in Chicago. There were over 100 shootings in Chicago on July 4th. 100! Boston doesn't see that many in multiple years. There are a handful of streets in Boston I wouldn't necessarily advise you to walk around at night, but there are no places you wouldn't be perfectly safe strolling around during the day. We are a prosperous place with incredible cultural institutions, a decent music scene and great restaurants. The area has much going for it. I could go on and on about the nature of our resilient and forward thinking areas of economic growth too but suffice it to say, come on down and see for yourself why it's a comfortable city to live in.
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Old 07-06-2017, 07:50 PM
 
486 posts, read 361,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vickychandrasen View Post
@Ne999 - Thank You !! My husband's job is in Downtown Boston on Franklin St, I need to find a job once I get there. Over here I am a Yoga Instructor. Neighborhood-wise I am looking to find more information on Allston, Cambridge Port. Some of the apartments that we saw in Somerville are very cramped and dark -no sunlight even though it is $2000. Trying to find apartments that are atleast 600 sqft and well ventilated. I know these things take time , keeping my fingers crossed !!
Ask your realtor if there's any units available in Ledgeview condos in Savin Hill - if so, you should be able to get a renovated 800sqft two bedroom with off-street parking for around $2000/month, with most of the utilities included. It's a quiet bedroom community and doesn't have that many entertainment options in the immediate vicinity, but it's only a 10 minute subway/sub-$10 Uber ride to downtown.
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Old 07-12-2017, 12:20 AM
 
Location: In the hot spot!
3,279 posts, read 4,418,769 times
Reputation: 2992
Quote:
Originally Posted by missionhill View Post
Here's an enthusiastic overview someone posted on another website-- I dunno, might be helpful...

Boston is a great town. Almost every place is walkable, if you pick a place anyway near the T you'll be absolutely fine without a car. I gave up mine ten years ago and I've never regretted it.
Housing IS expensive but there are plenty of places outside of the downtown core that are still relatively affordable. I wouldn't live in Waltham or god forbid Framingham to save my life. Those areas are a good long drive into thexpensiv center and are basically straight suburbs. (and yes Moody St in Waltham is... fine.)
Jamaica Plain is beautiful, lots of green space and large parks. The population skews towards progressive with a couple of built up commercial areas with coffee shops and restaurants, banks ect. Basically a friendly safe neighborhood. It's also rapidly yuppifing and growing more and more expensive. Areas in Dorchester, which has a lingering seedy reputation amonst those who pretty much know nothing about it, is in certain areas gentrifying at a quick pace. The Savin Hill area in Dorchester is a ten minute T ride from downtown has a beach and is a diverse and lovely neighborhood. A little further out is Ashmont. Same as Savin Hill with a bit more night time shenanigans but basically a good place to live. Lower Mills is even further out but is really just like living in an old time New England mill town. It's quiet and quaint. I wouldn't recommend East Boston. I lived there for years and with the closeness of the airport it is the loudest neighborhood ever. It does have a large population of Central Americans so the food there is outrageously good and cheap. I miss that. Brighton Center is just fine, quiet, has all the little shops you'd need to get by, pharmacy, banks, bars, places to catch a bite. Allston and Mission Hill are the epicenters for our undergrad student populations. Allston is fun but can be loud and surprisingly expensive. Somerville and Cambridge are very popular. They will be your most expensive bets. I tend to find them a bit boring personally. There's a certain lack of economic diversity. Mostly a lot of transplants with high paying jobs living in housing stock that should be nicer for what they are paying.
There are no areas in the whole of our metro region that even come close to the bad areas in Chicago. There were over 100 shootings in Chicago on July 4th. 100! Boston doesn't see that many in multiple years. There are a handful of streets in Boston I wouldn't necessarily advise you to walk around at night, but there are no places you wouldn't be perfectly safe strolling around during the day. We are a prosperous place with incredible cultural institutions, a decent music scene and great restaurants. The area has much going for it. I could go on and on about the nature of our resilient and forward thinking areas of economic growth too but suffice it to say, come on down and see for yourself why it's a comfortable city to live in.
What a great review! We were at home (Boston) last month for a graduation and were pleasantly surprised by the growth. There was a progressive, positive vibe happenning and I loved it. To the OP, I'm going to echo the others who suggested Jamaica Plains, I think it comes closest to meeting what you are looking for. I would go with Quincy next and then Malden. Malden is more diverse than Quincy, but I like downtown Quincy better. Check Dorchester as well because certain sections are undergoing serious gentrification right now. Boston is expensive, but it's a nice city?
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Old 07-12-2017, 10:59 AM
 
12 posts, read 7,545 times
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Thanks everyone , all your suggestions have been very handy these last few weeks. The advice I have got from all of you here has been very reliable and genuine.

My husband and I drove to Boston yesterday to check out some apartments and we really liked somerville and Cambridge. We did find 1 apt in Somerville in highland avenue near the school. However we will need to take the 88/90 buses to get to the Red Line. I wanted to ask how reliable are these buses as we will be heavily dependent on them. In new york it is hard to depend on buses if you want to keep time. But am not sure if that is the case in Boston as well. Since we will not have a car do you think it will be a problem?
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Old 07-12-2017, 11:41 AM
 
596 posts, read 784,660 times
Reputation: 1181
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickychandrasen View Post
Thanks everyone , all your suggestions have been very handy these last few weeks. The advice I have got from all of you here has been very reliable and genuine.

My husband and I drove to Boston yesterday to check out some apartments and we really liked somerville and Cambridge. We did find 1 apt in Somerville in highland avenue near the school. However we will need to take the 88/90 buses to get to the Red Line. I wanted to ask how reliable are these buses as we will be heavily dependent on them. In new york it is hard to depend on buses if you want to keep time. But am not sure if that is the case in Boston as well. Since we will not have a car do you think it will be a problem?
We take those buses fairly frequently, and no, they are not always on time. However it is only about a 20-30 minute walk from that area to Davis Square. When I want to go to (or from) Davis Square I usually just start walking (unless I know that a bus is coming in the next several minutes). On Highland Avenue there is a bus stop every couple of blocks. I have a car, but I rarely use it. It is possible to live a car-free lifestyle in this neighborhood (you might have to make some adjustments).
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Old 07-12-2017, 12:15 PM
 
12 posts, read 7,545 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pito_Chueco View Post
We take those buses fairly frequently, and no, they are not always on time. However it is only about a 20-30 minute walk from that area to Davis Square. When I want to go to (or from) Davis Square I usually just start walking (unless I know that a bus is coming in the next several minutes). On Highland Avenue there is a bus stop every couple of blocks. I have a car, but I rarely use it. It is possible to live a car-free lifestyle in this neighborhood (you might have to make some adjustments).
Thanks for your quick response. We would love to walk but its only during the winter months that we are worried about. Also, my husband needs to go downtown everyday. Google maps says its 35min commute, so is it safe to assume it might take 15-20 mins extra because of bus delays etc? Also, since you said you live in the area, are there grocery/convenience/pharmacy stores nearby? Thanks again!
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Old 07-12-2017, 12:24 PM
 
32,733 posts, read 22,687,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vickychandrasen View Post
Thanks for your quick response. We would love to walk but its only during the winter months that we are worried about. Also, my husband needs to go downtown everyday. Google maps says its 35min commute, so is it safe to assume it might take 15-20 mins extra because of bus delays etc? Also, since you said you live in the area, are there grocery/convenience/pharmacy stores nearby? Thanks again!


Yes, plenty. Market Basket is down the hill (that is where I did 90% of mine). There is multiple pharmacies and convenience stores in Davis, Porter, and at least a Rite Aid just outside of Union Sq.

Download the bus app and you're fine. I took those busses often and they run frequently.
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Old 07-12-2017, 01:33 PM
 
Location: (six-cent-dix-sept)
3,973 posts, read 1,941,937 times
Reputation: 2440
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickychandrasen View Post
Thanks everyone , all your suggestions have been very handy these last few weeks. The advice I have got from all of you here has been very reliable and genuine.

My husband and I drove to Boston yesterday to check out some apartments and we really liked somerville and Cambridge. We did find 1 apt in Somerville in highland avenue near the school. However we will need to take the 88/90 buses to get to the Red Line. I wanted to ask how reliable are these buses as we will be heavily dependent on them. In new york it is hard to depend on buses if you want to keep time. But am not sure if that is the case in Boston as well. Since we will not have a car do you think it will be a problem?
waiting for the bus outside in the winter is harsh. I preferred to be underground where it is warm. the frequency of the subway is much higher than the bus (sometimes every ten minutes vs. hourly).

highland créole cuisine is on that block if i remember correctly.
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Old 07-12-2017, 01:54 PM
 
12 posts, read 7,545 times
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Originally Posted by stanley-88888888 View Post
waiting for the bus outside in the winter is harsh. I preferred to be underground where it is warm. the frequency of the subway is much higher than the bus (sometimes every ten minutes vs. hourly).

highland créole cuisine is on that block if i remember correctly.
We need to make a decision by EOD today for the apartment on highland Avenue. As of now the only thing holding me back is the distance to David Square ... walking is something I will not consider during the winter months unless its less than 10 - 12 minutes. But in this case its a 30 minute walk.
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Old 07-12-2017, 02:03 PM
 
Location: a bar
2,545 posts, read 4,856,832 times
Reputation: 2588
Quote:
Originally Posted by vickychandrasen View Post
We need to make a decision by EOD today for the apartment on highland Avenue. As of now the only thing holding me back is the distance to David Square ... walking is something I will not consider during the winter months unless its less than 10 - 12 minutes. But in this case its a 30 minute walk.
I understand everyone's tolerance to the winter temps is different, but walking 30 minutes in Jan and Feb isn't that bad IMO. Particularly 5 minutes in, once the blood gets flowing. I'd certainly rather walk for 30 minutes, than stand and wait for a bus for 15.
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