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Old 08-14-2017, 01:00 PM
 
8,652 posts, read 8,788,567 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
In practical terms, I do believe that Boston is part of the Northeast corridor (the BosWash) despite any short stretches of less densely populated land between NYC and Boston.

But in support of posts making the contrary claim, I must concur that Boston is truly something special, exceptional, and to be singularly distinguished from those degenerates in the Mid-Atlantic with which the noble race of Bostonians have nothing in common. Boston must never be conflated with the Hoi Polloi. Better to consider it a distinguished partner of its Canadian and European cousins if it must be associated with any at all.

/s
Oh come on, DC Union Station is 3x busier than South Station for Amtrak Passengers. And that's even with the fact that both Northern and Southern Suburbs of DC have direct Amtrak NE Corridor service while anyone living North of Boston has to travel into Boston to take the train, and DC-NY gets 2x the train frequency than Bos-NY. The Freight map on the last page shows a similar picture.

Its quite clear that Boston is an outlier compared to the cities within the DC-NY Corridor.
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Old 08-14-2017, 03:33 PM
 
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Sure it's an outlier because it's the furthest from another major city. Relatively speaking when looking at what the rest of the country views as close in proximity Boston remains close and a part of the corridor
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Old 08-14-2017, 05:22 PM
 
1,335 posts, read 945,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
Sure it's an outlier because it's the furthest from another major city. Relatively speaking when looking at what the rest of the country views as close in proximity Boston remains close and a part of the corridor
Generally speaking, people ... specifically people posting on the internet ... fail to view things 'globally'.

I post one rail tonnage map and now everyone's nitpicking the volume difference between Boston, NYC, and DC while failing to acknowledge the original goddamned point: all these northern cities are interconnected to a degree not seen in large swaths of this country. Transfer doesn't have to be equal between cities to equal 'interconnected".

Oh, there's a 60-90 minute section of CT/MD which feels a bit desolate? Well, in Montana that's called "a trip to the store".
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Old 08-15-2017, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,871 posts, read 6,822,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Oh come on, DC Union Station is 3x busier than South Station for Amtrak Passengers. And that's even with the fact that both Northern and Southern Suburbs of DC have direct Amtrak NE Corridor service while anyone living North of Boston has to travel into Boston to take the train, and DC-NY gets 2x the train frequency than Bos-NY. The Freight map on the last page shows a similar picture.

Its quite clear that Boston is an outlier compared to the cities within the DC-NY Corridor.
Absolutely agreed.
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Old 08-15-2017, 07:37 AM
 
Location: East Coast
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Just because the DC station is busier than the Boston station doesn't mean that Boston is not part of the corridor.
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Old 08-15-2017, 08:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Oh come on, DC Union Station is 3x busier than South Station for Amtrak Passengers. And that's even with the fact that both Northern and Southern Suburbs of DC have direct Amtrak NE Corridor service while anyone living North of Boston has to travel into Boston to take the train, and DC-NY gets 2x the train frequency than Bos-NY.
Richmond is sort of an extension of the NE corridor, then of course you have Quantico and other major federal facilities south of D.C.. There isn't really an equivalent of that north of Boston, although it's really now looking like the NE Corridor is no longer the BOS-WASH Corridor but the Portland-Rchmond Corridor. There's more to it than just trains.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:18 AM
 
Location: East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Richmond is sort of an extension of the NE corridor, then of course you have Quantico and other major federal facilities south of D.C.. There isn't really an equivalent of that north of Boston, although it's really now looking like the NE Corridor is no longer the BOS-WASH Corridor but the Portland-Rchmond Corridor. There's more to it than just trains.
It's really not. Both Portland and Richmond are very different from the large cities in the BOS-WASH corridor.

Richmond is not that connected to DC. It's not physically that far, but there's not that much interplay between the two.

Although I do agree that there is more to the corridor than just trains.
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Old 08-15-2017, 09:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
It's really not. Both Portland and Richmond are very different from the large cities in the BOS-WASH corridor.
So is Providence, Worcester, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Richmond is not that connected to DC. It's not physically that far, but there's not that much interplay between the two.
It's pretty built up now between the two, and that corridor shares a lot in between.
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Old 08-15-2017, 12:34 PM
 
Location: East Coast
2,771 posts, read 1,578,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
So is Providence, Worcester, etc.
?? I don't understand this point. They're arguably within the corridor (especially Providence) because they're between two of the other cities. (Although I don't think anyone ever thinks anything of Worcester outside of MA)


It's pretty built up now between the two, and that corridor shares a lot in between.
There's sprawl from DC. But they're really not connected.
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Old 08-15-2017, 04:16 PM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
3,471 posts, read 3,006,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpio516 View Post
+1

I got into a discussion about metro areas in a different state's board. One person's definition was that a metro area is connected if there isn't 40 miles of rural area between urban/suburban areas.
I'm pretty sure you can drive from Boston to DC without going 40 miles of rural area - but I've never driven south out of Rhode Island on 95. From Springfield to Delaware, there's barely any rural area, let alone 40 continuous miles of it.

The Northeast is the definition of megalopolis. The term came from a 1961 study of the area.

Look at this map, there are two places you could make an argument, but where is the breaking point?
Crazy thing is that map is almost 20 years ago. Just for example DC-Baltimore region alone has added 2 million people since 2000. I can only imagine the whole megalopolis.
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