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Old 08-15-2017, 10:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpio516 View Post
+1

I got into a discussion about metro areas in a different state's board. One person's definition was that a metro area is connected if there isn't 40 miles of rural area between urban/suburban areas.
I'm pretty sure you can drive from Boston to DC without going 40 miles of rural area - but I've never driven south out of Rhode Island on 95. From Springfield to Delaware, there's barely any rural area, let alone 40 continuous miles of it.

The Northeast is the definition of megalopolis. The term came from a 1961 study of the area.

Look at this map, there are two places you could make an argument, but where is the breaking point?
One simple way to look at this has nothing to do with 40 miles of rural area between built-up land. Think of "megalopolis" as a stretch where you leave one city's suburbs and are right into the next city's suburbs, even if they're outlying exurbs with some rural character. Correct me if I have this wrong, but I'm pretty sure you can drive from Boston to Washington and be within the boundaries of some metropolitan area or other the entire way.

I'm basing that on the Census Bureau's official boundaries, not when someone might subjectively feel that the landscape has become kind of rural. The only parts I'm not sure about are whether you're immediately into Hartford's MSA when you leave Worcester's, and whether the gap between Wilmington and Baltimore is entirely within some city's metro area. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe that you do cross directly from one metro into the next in these gaps.

In New England, whether you cross through an unbroken string of metro areas might depend on the route you take. Not sure, but I'd guess you might have to go west from Boston and then enter CT from the north for this to be the case. There may be a gap between the Providence and Hartford MSA's.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by darkone View Post
Boston is part of the NEC. It is especially tied to NYC in terms of business activities and population flow. Additionally, all of New England is inundated with NY and NJ vacationers - just look at the number of those license plates every summer - and really year round. Cape Cod, the Berkshires, the Islands, RI, CT, VT and ME in particular are shared by residents of both metro areas.
Business activities, and the ties between businesses in the BOS-WASH stretch and employees who are alums of colleges in these cities. With these ties, Boston is clearly part of the Northeastern corporate culture.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
I guess it depends on a person's interest/hobbies and lifestyle. A NCAA or NASCAR fanatic would find Boston very lame in comparison to NC. If you are looking at history and natural features, Boston clearly wins. In that regard, Athens or Rome is more more interesting than either Boston or Charlotte. You couldn't pay me to live in those cities though, my point wasn't from the perspective of a tourist.



No Boston is a major center in education, medical care, finance and high tech/R&D. It might not have as significant a connection as NYC and D.C., but it's a close 2nd. Detroit doesn't even begin to compare.



With the mountains and ocean, NC is no slouch either. Of course NE has things to offer that NC doesn't (and vice versa), but California has things going for it that neither MA nor NC can match. My point wasn't to start a p@#%ing contest between different states, but to note that for MOST people not from the area (I understand this forum is frequented by a "different" sort) don't find Boston to be worth the cost IF they can find similar work elsewhere.
You make an excellent point in the first paragraph. An area's desirability does depend on the preferences of those looking at the area.

Now, without tracing this thread back through a number of pages, I'm not sure how NC entered the discussion, but Massnative is responding to some posts questioning Boston's attractiveness as a place to live in terms of amenities, rather than being only a place you go to for college or a job. In regard to those posts Massnative is responding to, regardless of what anyone thinks of Boston as a place to live--good or bad--I'm kind of lost when it comes to what this has to do with whether Boston is part of the Corridor.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
If Boston was the size of Salem then no. But it's not. It's a big city and very culturally relevant to the rest of the Northeast. Plus its not even THAT far it's just the Northeast is so densely packed that it seems far.
Good point. The gap between Boston and NYC is large only in a relative sense. It seems large when you consider how close together the big cities are from NYC south to D.C. Try to picture defining any kind of "corridor" between the very few and very widely scattered large cities in the interior of West, for example, and by comparison Boston is just a quick run to the corner store up from NYC.
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Old 08-15-2017, 10:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
Richmond is sort of an extension of the NE corridor, then of course you have Quantico and other major federal facilities south of D.C.. There isn't really an equivalent of that north of Boston, although it's really now looking like the NE Corridor is no longer the BOS-WASH Corridor but the Portland-Rchmond Corridor. There's more to it than just trains.
It's been years since I've traveled through VA on the road. I recall a very sparsely settled stretch between Washington and Richmond back in the day, but I do hear that this has filled in quite a bit. I'm more familiar with areas north of Boston, and I do subjectively have the sense that southern Maine is dense and busy enough to form the last straggling outskirts of the Corridor at the northern end. I've heard that the stretch from D.C. south to Richmond, or even southeast to the Hampton Roads area, may have become similar, but, as said above, I haven't driven through there in years, so I'll have to go on hearsay.
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:59 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Originally Posted by ogre View Post
It's been years since I've traveled through VA on the road. I recall a very sparsely settled stretch between Washington and Richmond back in the day, but I do hear that this has filled in quite a bit. I'm more familiar with areas north of Boston, and I do subjectively have the sense that southern Maine is dense and busy enough to form the last straggling outskirts of the Corridor at the northern end. I've heard that the stretch from D.C. south to Richmond, or even southeast to the Hampton Roads area, may have become similar, but, as said above, I haven't driven through there in years, so I'll have to go on hearsay.

So in all honesty with no exaggeration, the sprawl from DC extends now to Massaponax Virginia which is south of Fredericksburg and 61 miles from Washington DC. From that same point to the center of Richmond is 49 miles, but to connect to the northern Richmond suburbs is probably only about 30 miles away. At most that 30 miles is the largest gap that exists on the East Coast that I know of along I-95. Meaning from Petersburg Virginia all the way to New Hampshire there shouldn't be a gap larger than 30 miles of almost no development, unless somewhere in CT there is one greater. Richmond to HR has a much larger gap, but is still not completely uninhabited.

There still also is SOME development off of exits in that 30 mile grey area, which I definitely expect to fill in, because express HOT lanes from DC are being extended all the way to Fredericksburg, so one day those Richmonders will be able to take toll lanes for more than half the trip to DC.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: East Coast
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Originally Posted by ogre View Post
In regard to those posts Massnative is responding to, regardless of what anyone thinks of Boston as a place to live--good or bad--I'm kind of lost when it comes to what this has to do with whether Boston is part of the Corridor.
I've been thinking this (and occasionally pointed it out) through this entire thread. Whether you like a city has nothing to do with whether it is part of the corridor.

Regarding Richmond, DC sprawl is ridiculous. It seems to have calmed down a bit, but during the housing frenzy, prices were getting crazy in DC. I read that some people who worked in DC went as far as WV for housing (!!! -- I cannot even fathom doing this, and I don't see how that was at all sustainable). Crazy as this was, people were doing it. It seems like the housing prices have calmed somewhat. I had friends back then who were trying to buy a house and they were outbid on every single house they bid on, even with offering quite a bit over asking. I'm not hearing about that so much now.

So, it's not surprising that DC sprawl would creep toward the Richmond metro area. However, when you get outside the DC suburban counties in VA, you are seriously in the SOUTH. The culture is very different. It's that cultural difference that really disconnects a city like Richmond, and all the cities that some people would argue should be in the corridor -- Richmond, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Atlanta. They have their own linkage, but they are different from the cities in the NE corridor.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:33 AM
 
Location: That star on your map in the middle of the East Coast, DMV
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Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
I've been thinking this (and occasionally pointed it out) through this entire thread. Whether you like a city has nothing to do with whether it is part of the corridor.

Regarding Richmond, DC sprawl is ridiculous. It seems to have calmed down a bit, but during the housing frenzy, prices were getting crazy in DC. I read that some people who worked in DC went as far as WV for housing (!!! -- I cannot even fathom doing this, and I don't see how that was at all sustainable). Crazy as this was, people were doing it. It seems like the housing prices have calmed somewhat. I had friends back then who were trying to buy a house and they were outbid on every single house they bid on, even with offering quite a bit over asking. I'm not hearing about that so much now.

So, it's not surprising that DC sprawl would creep toward the Richmond metro area. However, when you get outside the DC suburban counties in VA, you are seriously in the SOUTH. The culture is very different. It's that cultural difference that really disconnects a city like Richmond, and all the cities that some people would argue should be in the corridor -- Richmond, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Atlanta. They have their own linkage, but they are different from the cities in the NE corridor.
There is a neck of WVA that is actually closer to DC than Richmond Va is, and many of those people would or still do commute into western suburbs like Tysons or Loudoun County Va, not all go into DC. With the Metro Silver Line being extended out to the west past Dulles airport I think this will only increase.

I agree Richmond is completely a part of the South and not culturally connected to Boston or New England etc. But believe it or not many people there in Richmond look northward before they do southward to the Carolinas and Atlanta etc. Which makes maybe a little sense due to their proximity to the corridor. Development almost completely dies south of Richmond/Petersburg for a pretty long stretch going southward.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:42 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
I've been thinking this (and occasionally pointed it out) through this entire thread. Whether you like a city has nothing to do with whether it is part of the corridor.

Regarding Richmond, DC sprawl is ridiculous. It seems to have calmed down a bit, but during the housing frenzy, prices were getting crazy in DC. I read that some people who worked in DC went as far as WV for housing (!!! -- I cannot even fathom doing this, and I don't see how that was at all sustainable). Crazy as this was, people were doing it. It seems like the housing prices have calmed somewhat. I had friends back then who were trying to buy a house and they were outbid on every single house they bid on, even with offering quite a bit over asking. I'm not hearing about that so much now.
Many people are still moving to the Harpers Ferry, WV area simply because it's the closest place to D.C. that is still affordable (and from PA as well). There is even a train from there that takes around 1.5 hours. You couldn't pay me to make that commute but when people become desperate...but many of those people are actually commuting to places like Sterling, VA.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
So, it's not surprising that DC sprawl would creep toward the Richmond metro area. However, when you get outside the DC suburban counties in VA, you are seriously in the SOUTH. The culture is very different. It's that cultural difference that really disconnects a city like Richmond, and all the cities that some people would argue should be in the corridor -- Richmond, Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Atlanta. They have their own linkage, but they are different from the cities in the NE corridor.
Some areas outside of Richmond like Chesterfield County to the south, do feel a bit southern. The city of Richmond (despite its history) and areas northward, not so much. It's changed a lot. It's nothing at all like Charlotte or Atlanta, and it shares almost no ties to those cities. Richmond and D.C. areas are more different than Boston/Providence, but Boston/NYC? I don't even know if I would say that much. But cultural differences aside, all these cities share many resources that are economic, governmental, educational and medical.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ogre View Post
You make an excellent point in the first paragraph. An area's desirability does depend on the preferences of those looking at the area.

Now, without tracing this thread back through a number of pages, I'm not sure how NC entered the discussion, but Massnative is responding to some posts questioning Boston's attractiveness as a place to live in terms of amenities, rather than being only a place you go to for college or a job. In regard to those posts Massnative is responding to, regardless of what anyone thinks of Boston as a place to live--good or bad--I'm kind of lost when it comes to what this has to do with whether Boston is part of the Corridor.
I'm not sure why that poster turned it into a matter of one's like or dislike of Boston. But while being too lazy on my part to go that far back in the discussion, I'm maybe recalling Boston being discredited as having full status in the NE Corridor due to its alleged lower importance than its peers D.C. and NYC. Which again, is a point I was initially disputing. Then one or two posters countered that Boston is the be all end all, which I disagreed with as well. As to why I brought NC in to the discussion, well there was honestly no point at all. I threw that out there totally randomly, anywhere else would work as well for that sake of the argument. But I guess realistically, there aren't many people moving from Boston to Billings, MT so it would have had to be somewhere people from MA actually transfer or move to.
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