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Old 08-13-2017, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,175 posts, read 876,943 times
Reputation: 1206

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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
The thing is, a lot of these people who "want" to live in Boston only do so for work reasons. These are people with no particular ties to the area, and once they are there a few years they just as soon up and move to NC or wherever else their careers take them. Of course for every one that leaves, there are one or two to replace them but it's not like Boston is the be all end all for reasons other than career opportunities.


I feel like that most transplants. This 1000 times. How do people not agree with this? Why would you choose to move to Boston for reasons other than work if you could pay the same price in NYC or DC, more cosmopolitan places with more to do and better connections? Most poeple I met who move here aren't in love with it and make frequent visits to other cities for fun. No on else has noticed this?


Because the desirable urban area of the Boston core Cambridge/Downtown/Somerville/Brookline/Southie/JP/Charlestown/South End is so small in terms of land area and the practical entertainment options are sparse can be explored within 2-4 months if you move here.


People may shoot down to Dorchester because it so large or traverse Roxbury because its near Longwood and NU...


My biggest gripe is that food and alcohol here is the most expensive I've seen on the east coast by a mile. That and we have the most frequently late public transit in the nation (20% tardiness) that cant even handle our early closing times.


I honestly feel like nothing mentioned above is controversial, maybe debatable.


I think Boston is impressive if youre from small town America or some bland Mass. town where you looked up to Boston with a metaphorical hard-on your whole life and were excited to go to Fenway. Its a pretty solid place to live if your blue collar, or working class though. Terrible for the middle class, and if youre rich I think you could live some place with more to offer in terms of culture and entertainment.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: New Mexico --> Vermont in 2019
9,061 posts, read 17,378,535 times
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The only detachment from the Northeast Corridor is a semi-rural break around the CT/RI border. But most of the Connecticut coast is fairly suburban with pockets of urban all the way to from New London to NYC. Boston to just south of Warwick, RI is all mostly suburban and urban. Providence can stand out on its own for its own regional and urban sphere, but it's undeniably connected to Boston. People around Providence are nuts about the Patriots.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Boston
1,175 posts, read 876,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
Boston has little to offer? Ignorance at its best. It offers a vibrant, urban lifestyle. It is top tier in the USA for not just colleges. It is also top tier for biotech research and development, hospitals and medicine, other tech fields. The economy is booming and the state is in good shape financially. These are reasons that General Electric just moved their headquarters here and many tech companies such as amazon or expanding their presence. An hour to the south Providence offers arts culture with RISD and a pretty good food scene with local chefs coming from Johnson and wales. I might actually prefer providence to Baltimore. The time from Boston to NYC vs D.C. To NYC is very comparable. I'm willing to say NYC offers more sure. But use your brain. Boston doesn't have little to offer.


Al Bostonians think about is work and the economy. You literally just said you have to head an hour south to Providence for culture or to checkout some colleges...what is practical about that?


What does Boston have to offer in terms of lifestyle I couldn't get in Philly NYC or DC? The cape is a dump, I don't like skiing (in large part because im black and everyone literally stares at me at any mountain I go to, if I didn't feel the eyes it'd be better.) I can still go skiing living in NYC or even Philly.


In my opinion the cultural diversity, size, and New England localism are the best part of Boston, as well as the walkability.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:18 PM
 
8,671 posts, read 8,824,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Al Bostonians think about is work and the economy. You literally just said you have to head an hour south to Providence for culture or to checkout some colleges...what is practical about that?


What does Boston have to offer in terms of lifestyle I couldn't get in Philly NYC or DC? The cape is a dump, I don't like skiing (in large part because im black and everyone literally stares at me at any mountain I go to, if I didn't feel the eyes it'd be better.) I can still go skiing living in NYC or even Philly
Oh please, Boston has theatres, Sports, bars, music venues, museums, etc that you can find in any non-NYC place in America, or in some cases exceeds.

Also Boston is very close (1.5-3 hrs) to the Lakes and Whites for year round outdoor activities, DC is like 8 hours from comparable mountains and NY is 2x further. The Coast of Maine and even the North Shore have no comparison on the whole east coast.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:37 PM
 
Location: East Coast
2,788 posts, read 1,591,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Boston has almost nothing to do with Baltimore or Washington.
Lots of people spend time between Harvard and DC. Lots of DC folks do visiting stints at Harvard (typically at the Kennedy School of Government) and experts from not just Harvard, but from other universities in the area are frequently on in depth news shows as experts. Many high level government administrators switch between academia and public service job, swinging in and out of government depending on which party is in power.

So, Boston does have a connection with DC. And it's only about an hour by plane.

I don't know if Boston has a big connection with Baltimore, but who really cares? There may be some interplay between Johns Hopkins med school and affiliated hospitals with the medical folks up here. Both are tops in the field. (Oh, and the O's play the Red Sox.)
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: East Coast
2,788 posts, read 1,591,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Also Boston is very close (1.5-3 hrs) to the Lakes and Whites for year round outdoor activities, DC is like 8 hours from comparable mountains and NY is 2x further.
No it's not. 2 hours - you can go to the Appalachians or the Poconos.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Columbia SC
8,003 posts, read 6,774,443 times
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I say the Northeast Corridor is Washington DC to Boston MA. Rode that train a few times.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:41 PM
 
8,671 posts, read 8,824,558 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
Lots of people spend time between Harvard and DC. Lots of DC folks do visiting stints at Harvard (typically at the Kennedy School of Government) and experts from not just Harvard, but from other universities in the area are frequently on in depth news shows as experts. Many high level government administrators switch between academia and public service job, swinging in and out of government depending on which party is in power.

So, Boston does have a connection with DC. And it's only about an hour by plane.

I don't know if Boston has a big connection with Baltimore, but who really cares? There may be some interplay between Johns Hopkins med school and affiliated hospitals with the medical folks up here. Both are tops in the field. (Oh, and the O's play the Red Sox.)
Fine Boston is no more connected to D.C. than Chicago, Atlanta, SF, LA or any large city with large University/Economic punch.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:41 PM
 
13,927 posts, read 4,155,834 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
The general definition of the Northeast Corridor is Boston to Washington. However I don't really think Boston is really attached to the corridor.

yes it is and you are wrong,move on.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:53 PM
 
Location: East Coast
2,788 posts, read 1,591,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
The thing is, a lot of these people who "want" to live in Boston only do so for work reasons. These are people with no particular ties to the area, and once they are there a few years they just as soon up and move to NC or wherever else their careers take them. Of course for every one that leaves, there are one or two to replace them but it's not like Boston is the be all end all for reasons other than career opportunities.
This doesn't really have much to do with the original question of whether it is in the NE corridor. But, for many careers, the careers will stay in Boston because that is where much of some industries are located.

NC doesn't have nearly the appeal of Boston. You have to deal with the insane legislature down there. I much prefer the politics of MA over NC.

Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Fine Boston is no more connected to D.C. than Chicago, Atlanta, SF, LA or any large city with large University/Economic punch.
But it is. I see a lot more interchange between government and academia with institutions in Boston than in Chicago, Atlanta, SF and LA. Sure, some people might go to U of Chicago, or occasionally you might see someone at Stanford or Emory. But many more go to Harvard. And the question involves the NE Corridor. Boston is physically much closer than any of those cities. it's an hour by plane to DC. Chicago and Atlanta are 2 hours, and SF and LA are 6. Plus Boston is in the same time zone.
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