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Old 08-13-2017, 04:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
This doesn't really have much to do with the original question of whether it is in the NE corridor. But, for many careers, the careers will stay in Boston because that is where much of some industries are located.

NC doesn't have nearly the appeal of Boston. You have to deal with the insane legislature down there. I much prefer the politics of MA over NC.



But it is. I see a lot more interchange between government and academia with institutions in Boston than in Chicago, Atlanta, SF and LA. Sure, some people might go to U of Chicago, or occasionally you might see someone at Stanford or Emory. But many more go to Harvard. And the question involves the NE Corridor. Boston is physically much closer than any of those cities. it's an hour by plane to DC. Chicago and Atlanta are 2 hours, and SF and LA are 6. Plus Boston is in the same time zone.
Atlanta has Emory, the CDC, CNN etc I would say Atlanta is tied closer to D.C. Than Boston.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:04 PM
 
Location: East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Atlanta has Emory, the CDC, CNN etc I would say Atlanta is tied closer to D.C. Than Boston.
Yes, it does have the CDC, which is pretty much the only argument. It is much further away from DC than any of the other cities in the chain, without the connecting cities in between. While CNN is headquartered in Atlanta, they have lots of shows that broadcast from NYC and CNN has a decent presence there.

Yes, Emory is a great institution and a world class university. But that alone isn't enough to tie it to DC. Generally the only government types who end up there are the ones who were from Atlanta in the first place.

Atlanta is respectable enough on its own. But it's not part of the NE corridor. And not tied more to DC than the other cities you mentioned.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:14 PM
 
403 posts, read 157,133 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pandas&presents View Post
My vote would be that it is not.

I lived most of my life in the areas surrounding NYC/Philly/B'more/DC. Boston is incredibly isolated from that megalopolis. By car or rail, it takes much longer to travel from Boston to NYC than from NYC to DC. Amtrak (particularly Acela) can get someone between NYC and DC much more quickly than between NYC and Boston. The latter seemingly takes an eternity, especially if you're on a train making a number of local stops. Driving between NYC and Boston can be at a snail's pace, particularly if involving I-95. The DC and NYC areas have their traffic problems but they are generally isolated to the areas immediately around the big cities and they also have the lane capacity on some of their major roads to better handle it. Traffic on I-95 in rural Connecticut is often at a standstill on a Saturday or Sunday afternoon.

Worse, there is a relative cultural dearth (yup, I said it) in the areas between NYC and Boston. Nothing particularly avant-garde in New England, except perhaps in the Boston area's tech industry, which is significant but Boston's not Silicon Valley or NYC and I'm talking more so about arts here. The creative stuff that should be fueling people's imaginations and keeping them entertained. This adds to the feeling of "nothingness" and a disconnect between, say, New Haven and Boston.

Many people here are in the real estate field and have vested interests in making the Boston area seem like something it's not IMO. Boston is a very expensive place to live with relatively little to offer. The disconnect from the east coast megalopolis should be apparent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
This is just a silly statement. I've seen the accusation a few times here on C-D that it is full of realtors whose only goal is to sell the Boston area as a great place to live when it it really isn't and they do this by somehow tricking and deluding unsuspecting people who otherwise have no idea what Boston offers. This idea is just ludicrous.

Boston is, indeed, an expensive place to live. "Relatively little to offer?" Well, okay, maybe for some people. And if that is true, then Boston is not for them. Although there are a very limited number of places that would have more to offer. And even if this were true, the alleged "disconnect" from the rest of the corridor is not at all apparent. Even if you don't like it, Boston is inextricably connected to the rest of the northeast corridor. You don't see the same kind of interconnectedness in other regions (like the South - it's kind of limited to Atlanta, and arguably you could add in Charlotte and the Triangle area of NC. The midwest potentially *could* be, but lots of those cities have suffered some major blows, and haven't become the economic powerhouses they might become if lots of things came into place. The midwest is dominated by Chicago. The Twin Cities are doing well. But, St. Louis, KC, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Detroit, Cleveland -- they're not there, and have fallen from better times. One day, theoretically, these cities could comprise a similar midwest corridor, but that would require some major efforts (not the least of which would be reliable high speed rail).

Cities further west are too spread out or are extremely different. (L.A. is not very far from Las Vegas, but the two are quite different.) Seattle-Portland-SF-L.A. covers a much greater distance than Bos-Wash.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
Al Bostonians think about is work and the economy. You literally just said you have to head an hour south to Providence for culture or to checkout some colleges...what is practical about that?


What does Boston have to offer in terms of lifestyle I couldn't get in Philly NYC or DC? The cape is a dump, I don't like skiing (in large part because im black and everyone literally stares at me at any mountain I go to, if I didn't feel the eyes it'd be better.) I can still go skiing living in NYC or even Philly.


In my opinion the cultural diversity, size, and New England localism are the best part of Boston, as well as the walkability.
My point in mentioning providence was to link Boston to NYC as the point of this thread is about Boston being so isolated as to not be part of the boswash corridor. I was not saying I have to go to providence to find culture. Boston + immediate urban areas i.e. Cambridge etc is just as big as D.C. NYC clearly offers more but philly and D.C. are very comparable. Boston offers things that philly and D.C. don't related to education, healthcare, biotech and research/development. the city is vibrant and plenty fun for me although I may be a bit older and don't feel the need to find a new establishment to drink every other night. I will give you Boston is not a premier nightlife destination. I hardly think that is required of a great city.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Montreal
114 posts, read 64,738 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
My point in mentioning providence was to link Boston to NYC as the point of this thread is about Boston being so isolated as to not be part of the boswash corridor. I was not saying I have to go to providence to find culture. Boston + immediate urban areas i.e. Cambridge etc is just as big as D.C. NYC clearly offers more but philly and D.C. are very comparable. Boston offers things that philly and D.C. don't related to education, healthcare, biotech and research/development. the city is vibrant and plenty fun for me although I may be a bit older and don't feel the need to find a new establishment to drink every other night. I will give you Boston is not a premier nightlife destination. I hardly think that is required of a great city.


As long as you can stumble onto a decent liquor/wine purveyor. I found that to be lacking, in the DT of all places...
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:25 PM
 
Location: East Coast
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ne999 View Post
My point in mentioning providence was to link Boston to NYC as the point of this thread is about Boston being so isolated as to not be part of the boswash corridor. I was not saying I have to go to providence to find culture. Boston + immediate urban areas i.e. Cambridge etc is just as big as D.C. NYC clearly offers more but philly and D.C. are very comparable. Boston offers things that philly and D.C. don't related to education, healthcare, biotech and research/development. the city is vibrant and plenty fun for me although I may be a bit older and don't feel the need to find a new establishment to drink every other night. I will give you Boston is not a premier nightlife destination. I hardly think that is required of a great city.
I had no issue with your raising the existence of Providence for this reason, and I think it makes sense.
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Old 08-13-2017, 04:49 PM
Status: "Soon I'll hear old winter's song.." (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Saint Paul, MN
5,391 posts, read 2,847,123 times
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If Boston was the size of Salem then no. But it's not. It's a big city and very culturally relevant to the rest of the Northeast. Plus its not even THAT far it's just the Northeast is so densely packed that it seems far.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I feel like that most transplants. This 1000 times. How do people not agree with this? Why would you choose to move to Boston for reasons other than work if you could pay the same price in NYC or DC, more cosmopolitan places with more to do and better connections? Most poeple I met who move here aren't in love with it and make frequent visits to other cities for fun. No on else has noticed this?


Because the desirable urban area of the Boston core Cambridge/Downtown/Somerville/Brookline/Southie/JP/Charlestown/South End is so small in terms of land area and the practical entertainment options are sparse can be explored within 2-4 months if you move here.


People may shoot down to Dorchester because it so large or traverse Roxbury because its near Longwood and NU...


My biggest gripe is that food and alcohol here is the most expensive I've seen on the east coast by a mile. That and we have the most frequently late public transit in the nation (20% tardiness) that cant even handle our early closing times.


I honestly feel like nothing mentioned above is controversial, maybe debatable.


I think Boston is impressive if youre from small town America or some bland Mass. town where you looked up to Boston with a metaphorical hard-on your whole life and were excited to go to Fenway. Its a pretty solid place to live if your blue collar, or working class though. Terrible for the middle class, and if youre rich I think you could live some place with more to offer in terms of culture and entertainment.
Most transplants I come across are usually lured to the area by work or education reasons, then they are like "yeah Boston is great, whatever....". Some grow attached to the area, yet the majority don't. Or they enjoy it for a year or two, then they burn out from the living costs/commuting/and social environment and are ready to move on as soon as they find opportunity elsewhere.


I certainly do notice this. This forum definitely attracts a certain set who place a much higher value on things like "walkability" (HINT-being able to walk to trendy brew pubs) and "diversity" (HINT-everything but "poor people" and non-liberals), than average folk do. And if people have other priorities, well they probably wouldn't be posting on the C-D Massachusetts forum to begin with. I disagree that it's a good place for even the working class, unless of course they had bought in prior to 15 years ago. It has become playground for the wealthy, and those who were lucky enough to be born before a certain timeframe.

If I didn't have all my family, friends and everything else in MA; I probably wouldn't have stuck around as long as I did.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:54 AM
 
6,980 posts, read 6,696,703 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chicagoliz View Post
This doesn't really have much to do with the original question of whether it is in the NE corridor. But, for many careers, the careers will stay in Boston because that is where much of some industries are located.

NC doesn't have nearly the appeal of Boston. You have to deal with the insane legislature down there. I much prefer the politics of MA over NC.
I was responding to another post, which sort of is related to this topic in a round-a-bout way. My point is that the area will remain "desirable" but more for the reasons of having a "captive audience" ie. people who work in certain fields where they have little choice in where to go>

Once AGAIN, my point wasn't to turn this into a state vs. state thread. But if you call NC's legislature "insane", well then MA has been down that road for much longer. Party-wise, NC still has more political balance than MA.

https://ballotpedia.org/North_Caroli...ly#Legislators

And if it comes to an ultra-right or an ultra-left, I will take the ultra-right. At least then I will be able to keep more of my paycheck.
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:22 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,534,340 times
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In practical terms, I do believe that Boston is part of the Northeast corridor (the BosWash) despite any short stretches of less densely populated land between NYC and Boston.

But in support of posts making the contrary claim, I must concur that Boston is truly something special, exceptional, and to be singularly distinguished from those degenerates in the Mid-Atlantic with which the noble race of Bostonians have nothing in common. Boston must never be conflated with the Hoi Polloi. Better to consider it a distinguished partner of its Canadian and European cousins if it must be associated with any at all.

/s
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:39 AM
 
1,690 posts, read 3,212,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
I feel like that most transplants. This 1000 times. How do people not agree with this? Why would you choose to move to Boston for reasons other than work if you could pay the same price in NYC or DC, more cosmopolitan places with more to do and better connections? Most poeple I met who move here aren't in love with it and make frequent visits to other cities for fun. No on else has noticed this?
People have personal reasons for their preferences. You might not like DC or New York all that much. To some DC is a kind of soulless government town populated by complacent bureaucrats. NYC has its attractions but for most Americans the old adage applies-- Great place to visit but wouldn't want to live there. Boston used to have the rep of a good place to live in many ways but dull to visit. Now with all the lifestyle amenities and prettied up historic neighborhoods and attractions, it's a pretty popular place to visit while traffic, transportation and cost of living woes have made it a more challenging place to live.

I guess most people who relocate to Boston do so for work or school but many come to love it as many natives do. Why else would it get the continuing criticism that if Bostonians got out more they'd stop thinking no other place quite measures up?
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