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Old 11-11-2017, 11:15 AM
 
7,341 posts, read 9,009,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by porterhouse View Post
I find the one in Central Square to be pretty useless. Iíve been in a few times to look for certain things one might find it a normal Target and walk right back out. For a new store itís also poorly maintained and always a mess.
I've had just the opposite experience. It actually has a pretty extensive stock of CVS-type stuff, and more groceries than you might imagine. It's also very clean--I've never seen anything fall off the shelves, and there's never anything blocking the aisles.
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Old 11-11-2017, 01:44 PM
 
Location: Central Mass
1,663 posts, read 2,237,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robr2 View Post
Yep - Dayton Hudson Corporation which included the late, much loved Lechmere.
Eventually Dayton Hudson.
It started in 62 as part of Dayton Corp in Minneapolis.
In 67, they merged with Hudson's (HQ in Detroit, the Hudson Building on Woodward was the biggest and tallest department store in the world when it opened in 61) and became Dayton-Hudson Corp.

Dayton-Hudson sold off the Hudson stores in the 90s to become Marshall Field's, and later they were all bought up by Macy's. All the Macy's stores in Michigan that are older than 20 years used to be Hudson's. The original Hudson's store in Detroit was imploded in 98 - it was a big deal, all the Detroit stations covered it live. It was 2.2M square feet of department store...

In the 80s and 90s, they sold off some stuff, like Lechmere and B Dalton to Barnes and Noble. In 1/2000, Dayton-Hudson renamed itself to Target corp.

I've been in the OG CityTarget in Chicago and the one on Boylston at Fenway. OK if I were stuck down there.
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Old 11-11-2017, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
3,499 posts, read 4,374,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeePee View Post
Yeah. I thought the same about Target's selection. I don't get what the fuss is. It seems they have a crap selection of not nearly just about everything. It seems more of a place that you walk in and walk out with crap you didn't need.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
I have an urban planning history book lying around somewhere that told the history of Target, of how it started off as the discount clearance division of an ordinary department store (Dayton's I believe was the name of the store), and how it became so successful that it outlived the original department store chain and became a full fledged chain in its own right. So yes, because of its discount store origins, the mission of Target is still to get you to buy a lot of cheap but useless junk.
Target is upscale WalMart with slightly higher prices. At least around here, Targets are clean and the employees are helpful, compared to WalMart where the stores are dirty and the employees seem to be in a perpetually bad mood.

I'm curious if you really think " the mission of Target is still to get you to buy a lot of cheap but useless junk" or if you're just saying that to keep some sort of urban street cred. Target sells lots of useful stuff. Housewares, toiletries, cleaning products, baby stuff, clothes, electronics, books, and even food. Sure they sell some useless junk, but it's a good place to get a lot of stuff without having to make a bunch of separate trips.
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Old 11-11-2017, 04:30 PM
 
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If you have a car, it's much better to go to a big Target like the one in Watertown. Much better selection and pricing.

The craziest urban Target is the one by Fenway Park (which opened in 2015 if I am correct). Every August/September or "Allston Christmas," students buy stuff for their dorms and completely empty the shelves, with checkout lines that can last for half an hour or more. There are so many colleges in the area that one always has to worry about things being out of stock there. The demand is just so high - but if you're looking for something right off the T, there aren't a lot of alternatives!

Of course, now you have the one on Commonwealth Ave. by BU and the one in Central Square, which compete more with CVS rather than with other big-box stores.

A couple of years ago, these were branded as "city Target", but then it was quickly changed to just "Target".
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Old 11-11-2017, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,692 posts, read 3,217,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayrandom View Post
Target is upscale WalMart with slightly higher prices. At least around here, Targets are clean and the employees are helpful, compared to WalMart where the stores are dirty and the employees seem to be in a perpetually bad mood.

I'm curious if you really think " the mission of Target is still to get you to buy a lot of cheap but useless junk" or if you're just saying that to keep some sort of urban street cred. Target sells lots of useful stuff. Housewares, toiletries, cleaning products, baby stuff, clothes, electronics, books, and even food. Sure they sell some useless junk, but it's a good place to get a lot of stuff without having to make a bunch of separate trips.
I'm not saying that Target (or Walmart for all that matter) doesn't have useful things to sell. I'm only saying Target's mission is to get their customers to buy more than what they really need to use at one time. Some customers fall for it and others control their impulses more. You allude to the fact that Target started out in the suburbs where consumers don't often have the luxury of walking or taking public transportation to shop so they have to drive and load up in one trip. Their original suburban stores still have really large parking lots for the obvious reason. The thing is, a lot of people have the impulse to buy more items than they originally intend to when they have a car trunk to put things in and especially from a store that offers low prices. You may not have that impulse and if so then good for you, you're a smart and seasoned shopper but not everyone can control themselves when shopping. The City Target model is more recent and I think the company is still experimenting with it, seeing how well it does in the midst of city folk who are more likely to walk or take public transit. It's almost like going from a Market Basket to a Trader Joes.
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Old 11-11-2017, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
3,499 posts, read 4,374,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
I'm not saying that Target (or Walmart for all that matter) doesn't have useful things to sell. I'm only saying Target's mission is to get their customers to buy more than what they really need to use at one time. Some customers fall for it and others control their impulses more. You allude to the fact that Target started out in the suburbs where consumers don't often have the luxury of walking or taking public transportation to shop so they have to drive and load up in one trip. Their original suburban stores still have really large parking lots for the obvious reason. The thing is, a lot of people have the impulse to buy more items than they originally intend to when they have a car trunk to put things in and especially from a store that offers low prices. You may not have that impulse and if so then good for you, you're a smart and seasoned shopper but not everyone can control themselves when shopping. The City Target model is more recent and I think the company is still experimenting with it, seeing how well it does in the midst of city folk who are more likely to walk or take public transit. It's almost like going from a Market Basket to a Trader Joes.
Target's mission is to make money by selling stuff. Just like almost every other store. There are a few local places near my parents that must be money laundering fronts because they actively disdain customers, but otherwise that's what everyone is doing. From the family-owned one room shops to the vast empires that are Amazon and WalMart.

It's not even clear to me what exactly "more than what they really need" even means. The idea of a need when it comes to consumer goods wilts under scrutiny. There isn't anything I can buy in a store that that I truly need. Stores certainly try to sell you stuff, big stores more efficiently than small ones, but Target really wants to be the store you buy everything you do need (which reminds me of this article).

I will agree that having a car trunk makes impulse buying easier. Conversely, not having a car makes all sorts of buying tougher.
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Old 11-11-2017, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,692 posts, read 3,217,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayrandom View Post
Target's mission is to make money by selling stuff. Just like almost every other store. There are a few local places near my parents that must be money laundering fronts because they actively disdain customers, but otherwise that's what everyone is doing. From the family-owned one room shops to the vast empires that are Amazon and WalMart.

It's not even clear to me what exactly "more than what they really need" even means. The idea of a need when it comes to consumer goods wilts under scrutiny. There isn't anything I can buy in a store that that I truly need. Stores certainly try to sell you stuff, big stores more efficiently than small ones, but Target really wants to be the store you buy everything you do need (which reminds me of this article).

I will agree that having a car trunk makes impulse buying easier. Conversely, not having a car makes all sorts of buying tougher.
It's the subconscious feeling one gets with all the subliminal messages retailers put out in order to get your business from weekly coupon ads to online discounts. You get the feeling that you're not going to get that item at such a discount price again and so you rush yourself to purchase it and maybe a few more extras too. You are right that every retailer does this in some shape or form, it's all part of doing marketing in retail just like the upcoming Black Friday deals are. However, Target being a discount retailer, markets differently than say Bloomingdale's or even Macy's.

If I go to Target to shop for a pillow for instance and saw the price for the pillow I want as 2 for $10.99 when just the other day I saw the price of just one pillow at Macy's was $7.99, guess what? I'm going to buy the two pillows at Target for $10.99 because my mind is telling me I found a good deal at Target. This negates the possibility that the two pillows from Target are flimsier than the one pillow at Macy's and also goes against my original intention to purchase just one pillow because now I have a second one that I might or might not use but I'd have to find a place to store it. In the end, that 2 for $10.99 deal might not be that sweet and Target got me for it. That I think is the argument the O.P. is trying to make. The store sure knows how to "target" its consumers or else it be out of business.
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Old 11-12-2017, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
3,499 posts, read 4,374,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Peasant View Post
It's the subconscious feeling one gets with all the subliminal messages retailers put out in order to get your business from weekly coupon ads to online discounts. You get the feeling that you're not going to get that item at such a discount price again and so you rush yourself to purchase it and maybe a few more extras too. You are right that every retailer does this in some shape or form, it's all part of doing marketing in retail just like the upcoming Black Friday deals are. However, Target being a discount retailer, markets differently than say Bloomingdale's or even Macy's.

If I go to Target to shop for a pillow for instance and saw the price for the pillow I want as 2 for $10.99 when just the other day I saw the price of just one pillow at Macy's was $7.99, guess what? I'm going to buy the two pillows at Target for $10.99 because my mind is telling me I found a good deal at Target. This negates the possibility that the two pillows from Target are flimsier than the one pillow at Macy's and also goes against my original intention to purchase just one pillow because now I have a second one that I might or might not use but I'd have to find a place to store it. In the end, that 2 for $10.99 deal might not be that sweet and Target got me for it. That I think is the argument the O.P. is trying to make. The store sure knows how to "target" its consumers or else it be out of business.
I get that they use a number of well-known sales tactics to drive sales. I just disagree that their mission is to sell you stuff you don't need.

Every store will try to sell you stuff, somewhat independent if you were looking to buy it--even single location independent stores and especially Macy's. Target relies more on advertising and displays because the don't employ sales staff--employees are there to restock, clean, and check you out. It's been years since I've bought something at Macy's, but they have people whose literal job is to get you to buy stuff.

20 Confessions Of A Former Macy

The only thing Target employees seem required to sell is their store credit card. Otherwise they just ask "did you find everything you were looking for". I've never heard the sales staff push a single other thing. The difference between Target and Walmart is that if you do ask an employee something, they will help you find it at a Target.

So yes, you need to shop at a place like Target with self-control, but that is definitely not unique to Target. Personally I find it much easier to ignore the flashing lights of Target than the salespeople at traditional urban department stores. My worst impulse buys almost always occur when I go to the grocery store hungry, though. That's just a recipe for disaster.
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Old 11-12-2017, 07:16 PM
 
1,130 posts, read 448,060 times
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I see the points in both arguments. But what i meant by useless is maybe less useful. I can get 3 sweaters nat target or the price of one sweater at L.L. Bean. When i wash target sweater 3 times its trash. Some people just see the 3 over 1 is better. but I have sweaters and jeans that are 10 years old, none of them are from those types of stores.
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Old 11-13-2017, 01:59 PM
 
8 posts, read 3,698 times
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There's a mini-Target opening up in Roslindale Square. Roslindale Square is now attracting a younger and more affluent crowd, some without cars. So it should do well in that location near the train station and the busses. I don't think it would affect the local stores. In fact, it would probably bring more foot traffic to the area.

Last edited by zoeyjane; 11-13-2017 at 02:24 PM..
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